And the August Giveaway Winners Are . . .

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Pomona full sizeTwo names were randomly chosen by Rafflecopter on the day after Pomona’s Day.

We are happy to announce that Bernadette S. from Houston, TX, and Sarah C. from San Mateo, CA, will each be the recipient from Pomona’s Pectin of a copy of Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin and a box of Pomona’s Pectin; and from Fillmore Container a case of 6 Orchard Road Jelly Jars, lids, and bands, and a stainless steel funnel.

Bernadette says: “I have been using Pomona’s Pectin to make vegan cheese since October 2012, when I read about it in a blog post (Vedgedout.com). I have had consistently good results using Pomona’s Pectin, with no set-up issues.

“This led me to use it in jam making, also with consistently good results. I stick to simple recipes since that is what I enjoy eating: strawberry, blueberry, peach, grape, orange. I peruse your website for ideas and tips, and follow you on social media.

Fillmore Container was new to me until I read about them via the link on your site. Looking forward to trying their products.

“Upon receiving my gifts, I plan to make Pepper Jack Cheese, try Watermelon Jelly again and, once citrus is in season here in southeast Texas, beginning late fall/early winter, try a cranberry orange preserve, since those fruits go so well together. Maybe a blood orange jam. (Note from Pomona’s: For Bernadette and the rest of us who didn’t win, we have now added Watermelon Jelly and Watermelon Jam recipes to our website!)

“Also I will share Pomona’s Pectin info at our monthly vegan potluck since people are looking for ways to make vegan eating easy and good. Again, thank you.”

Gratefully, graciously, gracefully,
B

And Sarah says:  “I’ve only canned jam a handful of times. I heard about Pomona’s soon after my first time, when I used traditional pectin. I wish I could remember exactly where, I think it was on a blog, and then I saw it in Williams Sonoma.

“I’m interested in a low-added-sugar diet (only partially successfully achieved), so Pomona’s, with its low sugar compatibility, seems like a great resource I haven’t tried yet.

“I hadn’t actually heard of Fillmore Container until I saw the giveaway posted. I don’t actually own any specialty canning equipment except for a small assortment of jars.

“I’m not a huge jam-eater so for a while I was doing an occasional splurge on artisan jam from my local Farmers’ Market. I love cooking though, and canning/jamming seems to be an exciting new field for my experimentation.

“I’m really looking forward to reading Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin and trying out the pectin and jars and funnel. Thank you so much!!”

Best,
Sarah

Our congratulations to both Bernadette and Sarah and thank you to everyone who participated. That’s all for now, but stay tuned, we may try this again!

Watermelon Jam

watermelon-public domainWatermelon Jam is a low-sugar cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Watermelon Jam Ingredients

4 cups watermelon puree (use a seedless watermelon or see Step 2 below)
4 teaspoons calcium water
½ cup lemon juice
¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
3½ teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Watermelon Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. If watermelon is seedless, puree fruit to a pulp in blender or food processor. If watermelon has seeds, remove the seeds prior to pureeing.

3. Measure puree into sauce pan.

4. Add calcium water and lemon juice, and mix well.

5. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

6. Bring fruit to a full boil. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

7. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

If you want to make jelly with only the juice of the watermelon, see our Watermelon Jelly recipe.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Watermelon Jelly

watermelon-public domainWatermelon Jelly is a low-sugar cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Watermelon Jelly Ingredients

4 cups watermelon juice (see Step 2 below)
4 teaspoons calcium water
½ cup lemon juice
¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
4¼ teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Watermelon Jelly Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Mash watermelon and strain out the pulp and seeds.

3. Measure juice into sauce pan.

4. Add calcium water and lemon juice, and mix well.

5. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

6. Bring juice to a full boil. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jelly comes back up to a boil. Once the jelly returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

7. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

If you want to make jam, using a puree of pulp and juice, see our Watermelon Jam recipe.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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I bought two boxes of Pomona’s Pectin and have had wonderful successes ever since.

Even though I’ve been canning for a few years, I recently took a local class on canning to see what tips I could pick up. Our instructor recommended Pomona Pectin to me when I mentioned to her that I had never been successful at getting my jams and jellies to set up. She suggested I not double or triple batches, but make one small batch at a time and use Pomona’s Pectin for successful results. I went right out and bought two boxes of Pomona’s Pectin and have had wonderful successes ever since. It’s easy to use, a usage chart is included, and with the reduced sugar levels I now taste the flavor of the fruit instead of the sugar. I never have any trouble getting my jams/jellies to set up since using Pomona’s Pectin.

I did have one problem when I forgot to mix the dry pectin in with the dry sugar and instead added it to the cooked fruit at the end. Strictly operator error, but your website and response to my phone call helped me solve that problem! Thank you for the help.

I now recommend Pomona’s Pectin to my friends. I think it’s the best pectin to use.
Thank you for a great product.

Your loyal customer,
Jackie Veats
Washington State
August 15, 2014

White Nectarine-Lavender Jam

White Nect-Lav - Jam on railing

Karen’s White Nectarine-Lavender Jam posing for a photo

Created and contributed by Karen Killebrew, White Nectarine-Lavender Jam is a low-sweetener cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4-5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

White Nectarine-Lavender Jam Ingredients

1 to 2 Tablespoons lavender buds/flowers in cheesecloth bag or tea ball
(See Note below about culinary lavender.)
½ cup water
4 cups unpeeled, chopped, and mashed white nectarines (chopped to ¼” dice)
¼ cup lemon juice
4 teaspoons calcium water
¾ cup agave syrup
3 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

White Nectarine-Lavender Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Bring water and lavender to a simmer in a large pan and simmer for 10 minutes. Add mashed nectarines and lemon juice. Bring to a simmer and simmer uncovered, stirring occasionally, for about 10 minutes, until fruit starts to release juices.

3. Remove from heat. Cool in a bowl, then cover and let steep for 2-4 hours in the refrigerator. Remove lavender.

4. Measure out 4 cups and return fruit to pan. If you are a little short of the 4 cups, just add some water to make 4 cups. Add 4 teaspoons of calcium water and mix well.

5. Measure agave into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into agave. Set aside.

6. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-agave mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

7. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Note about culinary lavender: Depending on when the lavender was picked, your dry lavender flowers may vary in intensity. We grow our own, and harvest and dry the buds in late May or early June, when the flowers are just fully opened. Once we remove the flowers from the stalks, we store the buds in glass jars in a dark cabinet. When the flowers are freshly dried, simmering brings out a pretty lavender color and a more intense flavor. I suggest you try the jam in a small batch the first time to see how strong the lavender flavor is, and then adjust the amount of lavender flowers in future batches accordingly. You may also add 1-2 drops of lavender oil after simmering and steeping the fruit with the lavender if you’d like a stronger flavor.

Karen's homegrown lavender buds

Karen’s homegrown lavender buds

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Jam Notes: A Giveaway to Celebrate Pomona’s Day! New Recipes Too . . .

August 2014 – Jam Notes Update
Celebrate Pomona’s Day! Enter our Give Away: Books, Pectin, Jars, Funnel

(Details Below)

CanningCraft Creates: Seedless Raspberry-Honey-Vanilla Jam

By Allison Carroll Duffy

I must admit to a somewhat sentimental attachment to raspberries. As a kid, I spent summers on an island (aptly named Raspberry Island) overflowing with wild raspberry bushes.

My brother and I would spend hours amidst the brambles picking the bright red, sweet-tart, little gems. Occasionally we’d pick enough berries that we’d need to use our t-shirts as makeshift baskets to carry them back to the house, but mostly we would just eat them as we picked.

Sentimental attachments aside, raspberries are just plain delicious – the quintessential summer fruit. So when we moved to our new home a few years ago, one of the first things we planted was a good-sized patch of raspberry bushes. Finally this summer, the canes are starting to bear a decent quantity of fruit.

Our boys are thrilled; recently they’ve gotten in the habit of running down to the raspberry patch at various points during the day to see if there are any newly ripe berries . . . and if there are, they eat them immediately. They’ve become such berry fans that I had to ask them to hold off on the eating part for just a bit so that I could have enough berries to make this recipe! A good problem to have, of course.

Raspberry seeds don’t really bother me (they aren’t nearly as annoying as blackberry seeds), so I generally just ignore them. On occasion, however, I’ve thought that it might be nice to indulge in a bit of raspberry goodness totally unencumbered by seeds. So the boys and I made this recipe the other day.

To remove the seeds, I pressed mashed raspberries through a fine mesh strainer. It’s a bit of a time-intensive process, but the results are totally worth it. This jam is smooth in the way that a jelly is, but has much more body since it’s made from the pulp of the fruit, not just the juice (as is the case with most jellies).

For the sweetest, richest-tasting jam, be sure to use berries that are fully ripe.

Seedless Raspberry-Honey-Vanilla Jam Recipe here.

 

~~~~~

Celebrate Pomona’s Day! Enter our Give Away: Book, Pectin, Jars, Funnel!

The Roman Goddess Pomona and her husband Vertumnus shared the Roman festival, Vertumnalia, on August 13. In honor of Pomona, we are choosing 2 winners, each to receive a copy of Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin, by Allison Carroll Duffy, and a box of Pomona’s Pectin. Fillmore Container is joining with us and giving each winner a case of 6 Orchard Road 8-oz jelly jars, lids, and bands, and a stainless steel funnel. Click on the link below to enter.

Pomona was the goddess of fruitful abundance in ancient Roman religion and myth. Her name comes from the Latin word pomum, “fruit,” specifically orchard fruit. Pomona was the goddess of fruit trees, gardens, and orchards. She watches over and protects fruit trees and cares for their cultivation. She was not actually associated with the harvest of fruit itself, but with the flourishing of the fruit trees.
Give Away is open to anyone with a mailing address in the U.S. or Canada. Everyone gets 2 Free Entries. We will announce the winners on our website by August 15 and in the September Jam Notes.

~~~~~
Pomona’s News
We have a wedding in the family. Connie’s son, Galen, is getting married to Caitlin on September 6 in Northampton, Massachusetts. The whole family will be there (and we have a big one!), which means Connie and Mary Lou have lots of preparation to do, and after that lots of celebrating. In honor of the wedding, we are:
Closing Pomona’s for all business, both Shipping and Jamline, from Thursday, 9/4 through Tuesday, 9/9.

We will reopen on Wednesday, 9/10.If you know you will be needing pectin, please order NOW!

Caitlin, Galen, and Connie in Shelburne Falls, MA.

Copyright © , All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you signed up to receive Jam Notes, Pomona’s Pectin’s E-Newsletter. Jam Notes is published 3 times each year: February, June, and September,  with occasional short updates containing new recipes in April, August, and November.Our mailing address is: 

 

CanningCraft Creates: Seedless Raspberry-Honey-Vanilla Jam

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

I must admit to a somewhat sentimental attachment to raspberries. As a kid, I spent summers on an island (aptly named Raspberry Island) overflowing with wild raspberry bushes.

My brother and I would spend hours amidst the brambles picking the bright red, sweet-tart, little gems. Occasionally we’d pick enough berries that we’d need to use our t-shirts as makeshift baskets to carry them back to the house, but mostly we would just eat them as we picked.

Sentimental attachments aside, raspberries are just plain delicious – the quintessential summer fruit. So when we moved to our new home a few years ago, one of the first things we planted was a good-sized patch of raspberry bushes. Finally this summer, the canes are starting to bear a decent quantity of fruit.

Our boys are thrilled; recently they’ve gotten in the habit of running down to the raspberry patch at various points during the day to see if there are any newly ripe berries . . . and if there are, they eat them immediately. They’ve become such berry fans that I had to ask them to hold off on the eating part for just a bit so that I could have enough berries to make this recipe! A good problem to have, of course.

Connor, Dylan, and the raspberries

Connor and Dylan in the raspberry patch

 

Raspberry seeds don’t really bother me (they aren’t nearly as annoying as blackberry seeds), so I generally just ignore them. On occasion, however, I’ve thought that it might be nice to indulge in a bit of raspberry goodness totally unencumbered by seeds. So the boys and I made this recipe the other day.

 

Jar of jam

To remove the seeds, I pressed mashed raspberries through a fine mesh strainer. It’s a bit of a time-intensive process, but the results are totally worth it. This jam is smooth in the way that a jelly is, but has much more body since it’s made from the pulp of the fruit, not just the juice (as is the case with most jellies).

For the sweetest, richest-tasting jam, be sure to use berries that are fully ripe.

 

 

Seedless Raspberry-Honey-Vanilla Jam

cropped raspberry jam on breadSeedless Raspberry-Honey-Vanilla Jam is a low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy. This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin.

She says: “This jam is smooth in the way that a jelly is, but it has much more body since it’s made from the pulp of the fruit, not just the juice (as is the case with most jellies). For the sweetest, richest-tasting jam, be sure to use berries that are fully ripe.”

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Seedless Raspberry-Honey-Vanilla Jam Ingredients

3 level quarts of raspberries
1 vanilla bean
2 teaspoons calcium water
1 cup honey
2 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Seedless Raspberry-Honey-Vanilla Jam Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

Baskets of berries

2. Pick through raspberries, discarding any stems. If raspberries look clean, rinsing them is optional.

3. Place berries in a large bowl and mash them thoroughly (a potato masher works well for this).

cropped Mashing raspberries

4. Place a mesh strainer over a large bowl, and transfer mashed berries into the mesh strainer. Press the mashed berries through the strainer (the back of a wooden spoon, as well as clean fingers, works well for this), so that the raspberry pulp goes through the strainer into the bowl below, while the seeds remain in the strainer.

Mashing with little sieve

5. Measure out 4 cups of the raspberry pulp (you may have some left over; if so, you can use it for something else.) Pour the measured pulp into a large sauce pan.

6. Slice vanilla bean pod in half lengthwise, then scrape out the seeds (a paring knife works well for this). Add the vanilla seeds, along with the pod itself, to the raspberry pulp. Add the calcium water as well, and stir to combine.

7. In a separate bowl, combine the honey and pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

8. Bring raspberry pulp to rolling boil over high heat. Add honey-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return jam to a boil, then remove from heat. Using a pair of tongs, carefully remove and discard the vanilla bean pod.

9. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jam, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

10. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

11. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

12. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

You will find the recipe only (with fewer pictures) here.

You will find our Pomona’s Day Give Away (book, pectin, jars, funnel), which is happening August 5 through August 13, 2014, here.

August 2014 — Giveaway to Celebrate Pomona’s Day! Scroll Down to See Winners . . .

Pomona full size

Pomona, our namesake, was the Roman goddess of fruitful abundance. Her name comes from the Latin word pomum, “fruit,” specifically orchard fruit. Pomona watches over and protects fruit trees and cares for their cultivation. Her festival day is August 13.

In her honor, Pomona’s Pectin and Fillmore Container have put together a gift pack for 2 lucky winners. Each winner will receive –

From us:
~ A copy of Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin by Allison Carroll Duffy (75 inspiring low-sugar jam, jelly, preserve, conserve, and marmalade recipes)
~ A box of Pomona’s Pectin.

Preserving with Pomona Pectin cover

 

From Fillmore Container:
One case of Orchard Road regular mouth 8-oz jelly jars (6 jars)
~ One pack of Orchard Road regular mouth lids and bands (6 per pack)
~ One regular mouth stainless funnel

Orchard Road jars & funnel

Orchard Road jars & funnel

Also in the spirit of celebration, we are sharing with you the recipe for Gingered Lemon-Fig Preserves from Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin (see below for the recipe).

This Giveaway is open to anyone with a mailing address in the U.S. or Canada who is 18 years or older. The entry dates are from August 5 through August 13, 2014 (Pacific Daylight Time).

There is nothing special you need to do to enter the Giveaway. Everyone gets 2 free entries.

If you’ve never entered a Rafflecopter Giveaway, click here for a video and diagram of how it works.

Leaving a comment on this blog post does not enter you into the Giveaway, but of course we always love to get your comments!

Winners will be randomly chosen. We will email the winners to send us their mailing address. The names of the winners will be posted on the Pomona’s Pectin website blog 48 hours after the giveaway ends.

Enter the Giveaway using the box below.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Get the Gingered Lemon-Fig Preserves recipe.

Gingered Lemon-Fig Preserves from "Preserving with Pomona's Pectin" by Allison Carroll Duffy.

Gingered Lemon-Fig Preserves from “Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin” by Allison Carroll Duffy.

 

Read Allison’s August 2014 guest blog post and brand new recipe for Seedless Raspberry-Honey-Vanilla Jam.

Visit Fillmore Container’s website. They are a purveyor of all kinds of containers & closures, canning accessories, party supplies, and candle supplies. They also sell Pomona’s Pectin!

Gingered Lemon-Fig Preserves

Gingered Lemon-Fig Preserves from "Preserving with Pomona's Pectin" by Allison Carroll Duffy.

Gingered Lemon-Fig Preserves from “Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin” by Allison Carroll Duffy.

Excerpted from Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin by Allison Carroll Duffy (Fair Winds Press, June 2013).

Allison says: In this spectacular preserve, a touch of heat from the ginger and a little tartness from the lemons beautifully highlight the lushness of fresh, ripe figs. Try serving sandwiched between gingersnap cookies to accentuate its flavor profile. To ensure proper acidity levels, be sure to use commonly available, full-acid lemons such as Eureka or Lisbon lemons in this recipe.

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water may be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Yield: 4 to 5 half-pint (8-ounce) jars

Gingered Lemon-Fig Preserves Ingredients

2 pounds ripe figs
2 tablespoons peeled, finely grated ginger root
7 medium lemons, divided
4 teaspoons calcium water
1¼ cups sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Gingered Lemon-Fig Preserves Directions

1. Wash your jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring canner to a rolling boil, and boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize them. (Add 1 extra minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.) Reduce heat and allow jars to remain in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan, heat to a low simmer, and hold until ready to use.

2. Rinse figs, remove stems, and slice them in half lengthwise. (Cut them into smaller pieces if you prefer, or if you’re working with large figs.) Combine figs in a saucepan with grated ginger.

3. Wash lemons thoroughly. Using a vegetable peeler, slice off long pieces of the exterior of some of the lemon peels, avoiding the inner white part. Then, using a chef’s knife, slice these pieces into very thin strips about 1-inch long. Repeat this process until you have accumulated ¼ cup of thin, 1-inch long strips. Add these strips to the fig mixture.

4. Slice lemons in half and squeeze out their juice, discarding the remaining peels. Divide the juice, setting aside 1/3 cup for later use. Add the remaining quantity to the fig mixture.

5. Bring the fig mixture to a boil over high heat, reduce heat, and simmer, covered, for 12 to 15 minutes or until lemon peels are soft, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat.

6. Measure 4 cups of the cooked fig mixture and return the measured quantity to the saucepan. Add the reserved 1∕3 cup lemon juice and calcium water and mix well.

7. In a separate bowl, combine sugar and pectin powder. Mix thoroughly and set aside.

8. Bring fig mixture back to a full boil over high heat. Slowly add pectin sugar mixture, stirring constantly. Continue to stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve pectin while the preserves come back up to a boil. Once the preserves return to a full boil, remove from heat.

9. Can Your Preserves: Remove jars from canner and ladle jam into hot jars, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, put on lids and screw bands, and tighten to fingertip tight. Lower filled jars into canner, ensuring jars are not touching each other and are covered with at least 1 to 2 inches of water. Place lid on canner, return to a rolling boil, and process for 10 minutes. (Add 1 extra minute of processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level). Turn off heat and allow canner to sit untouched for 5 minutes, then remove jars and allow to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Confirm that jars have sealed, then store properly.

TIP: Grate That Ginger!
Using a paring knife or a vegetable peeler, slice the thin, brown skin off a chunk of fresh, firm ginger root. Then, using a fine mesh grater, grate the ginger root. Don’t peel the whole root at once—continue to peel as you go along, so that you don’t peel more than you need. Grating the ginger will create a good bit of juice; be sure to incorporate it into your measured quantity of grated ginger.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Seedless Raspberry-Honey-Vanilla Jam

cropped raspberry jam on breadSeedless Raspberry-Honey-Vanilla Jam is a low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy. This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin.

She says: “This jam is smooth in the way that a jelly is, but it has much more body since it’s made from the pulp of the fruit, not just the juice (as is the case with most jellies). For the sweetest, richest-tasting jam, be sure to use berries that are fully ripe.”

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Seedless Raspberry-Honey-Vanilla Jam Ingredients

3 level quarts of raspberries
1 vanilla bean
2 teaspoons calcium water
1 cup honey
2 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Seedless Raspberry-Honey-Vanilla Jam Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Pick through raspberries, discarding any stems. If raspberries look clean, rinsing them is optional.

3. Place berries in a large bowl and mash them thoroughly (a potato masher works well for this).

Mashing with little sieve4. Place a mesh strainer over a large bowl, and transfer mashed berries into the mesh strainer. Press the mashed berries through the strainer (the back of a wooden spoon, as well as clean fingers, works well for this), so that the raspberry pulp goes through the strainer into the bowl below, while the seeds remain in the strainer.

5. Measure out 4 cups of the raspberry pulp (you may have some left over; if so, you can use it for something else.) Pour the measured pulp into a large sauce pan.

6. Slice vanilla bean pod in half lengthwise, then scrape out the seeds (a paring knife works well for this). Add the vanilla seeds, along with the pod itself, to the raspberry pulp. Add the calcium water as well, and stir to combine.

7. In a separate bowl, combine the honey and pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

8. Bring raspberry pulp to rolling boil over high heat. Add honey-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return jam to a boil, then remove from heat. Using a pair of tongs, carefully remove and discard the vanilla bean pod.

9. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jam, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

10. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

11. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

12. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Find the blog post attached to this recipe (with more pictures) here.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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What to do? Make jam with Pomona’s!

With a bumper crop of berries hanging on our bushes, our freezer was soon too full to accommodate any more. What to do? Make jam with Pomona’s!

I have been a fan of this pectin since 2005 and can’t say enough about how easy it is to use and how helpful Connie has been on the Jamline when I got myself into a wee bit of a jam jam.

I’m impressed with how the website has grown to be even more informative and organized! Good job!

Carol Entin
Rehoboth, MA
August 2, 2014

Rose Petal Jelly

Contributed by Chrissy Hyde, Rose Petal Jelly is a low-sugar cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Chrissy says, “Rose Petal Jelly is very popular with the Persian and Eastern European communities that often use roses in cooking. A friend of mine who spent time in Moldova (a landlocked country in Eastern Europe located between Romania to its west and Ukraine to its north, east, and south. Its capital city is Chișinău) asked me to try and re-create the Rose Petal Jelly she had while there. When she tasted it, she said it was just as she remembered! It was heavenly on a plain scone.”

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Rose Petal Jelly Ingredients

4½ cups hot (not boiling) water
1 cup dried dark pink rose petals (see Note below)
3½ teaspoons calcium water
½ cup lemon juice
1¾ cups sugar
3½ teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Note about rose petals: This recipe is written for dried rose petals, not fresh. Chrissy says: “Be sure they have not been sprayed with any chemicals. I purchased my dried rose petals at Spice & Tea Exchange. Break off and discard any large white pieces. The white part of the rose will make your jelly bitter.”

Rose Petal Jelly Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Boil water and allow it to cool for 5 minutes before pouring over the rose petals in a sauce pan or heat proof bowl with lid. Cover and allow the petals to steep for 20 minutes.

3. Using a food mill, a fine mesh strainer, or cheesecloth, drain and discard the rose petals, reserving the infused water.

4. Measure 4 cups of infused water into a sauce pan. (If necessary, add extra water to meet this measurement.)

5. Add calcium water and lemon juice, and mix well.

6. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

7. Bring mixture in sauce pan to a full boil. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jelly comes back up to a boil. Once the jelly returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

8. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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June Jam Notes: Sweet Cherry-Rhubarb Jam Recipe, Strawberry-Vanilla Preserves Recipe, and more . . .

 

June 2014 - #9

Rhubarb & Cherries — Oh So Good!

By Allison Carroll Duffy young boy cutting rhubarb

I love rhubarb season. Here in Maine, rhubarb is one of the earliest fresh green edibles to emerge from the soil each spring, so it’s always a much-anticipated treat.  It’s delicious in pie, in jam, or simply stewed with a little honey.

Its sour, slightly astringent tang also makes it a perfect partner for sweeter fruits.  Strawberries and rhubarb are a classic combination, but lately I’ve been itching to try some other pairings.  Sweet cherries are a favorite of mine, and while they’re not in season here in Maine yet, some readers in warmer climates may have local cherries available, so I thought I’d give Cherry-Rhubarb Jam a go.

plate of cherries

And what a treat it is! The jam is a beautiful deep, rich red, and the cherries are sweet enough to offset the tartness of the rhubarb without having to add a lot of extra sugar. Be sure to use sweet cherries (Bing cherries, for example), not sour cherries.
trimming rhubarb stalks
To remove the cherry pits, 
you can use a pitter if you have one, but it’s not necessary; simply slice the cherries in half with a paring knife and pick out the pits. To chop the pitted cherries, I use a chef’s knife, but you can also chop them in a food processor.

As for the rhubarb, select fresh, firm stalks.  Most rhubarb for sale at farmers’ markets or grocery stores has already been trimmed, but if not (or, if you’re harvesting it yourself) be sure to trim it thoroughly, completely removing and discarding all leaves.  The stalks are the only part you want to use, as the leaves themselves are poisonous.

Typically, the stalks are similar in size to celery stalks, though this can vary.  The color varies also, from green to red and anywhere in between. For the deepest red jam, select stalks that are red rather than green.  In terms of taste and texture, though, both work equally well – and both make delicious jam.  Try this jam swirled into yogurt or on top of vanilla ice cream . . . oh so good! 

Sweet Cherry-Rhubarb Jam Ingredients:

1¼ pounds sweet cherries
1 pound trimmed rhubarb stalks
½ cup water
2 tablespoons lemon juice
3 teaspoons calcium water
1¼ cups sugar
2 ½ teaspoons Pomona’s Universal Pectin Powder
~~~~~

Strawberry-Vanilla Preserves from Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin by Allison Carroll Duffy

Did You Know?

A preserve is different from a jam! “In a preserve the fruit remains more whole; small berries or cherries are left as is, and larger fruits, such as apples or peaches are cut into uniform chunks,” says Allison Carroll Duffy in Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin.

The fruit is then suspended in jelled liquid, as you can see in the photo above. When making a preserve, you can use a smaller amount of Pomona’s Pectin because you are only jelling the liquid not the fruit.

To illustrate, here are the ingredients for Allison’s recipe for Strawberry-Vanilla Preserves, excerpted from Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin.

Strawberry-Vanilla Preserves Ingredients

2¼ pounds strawberries
½ cup water
1 vanilla bean
1½ teaspoons calcium water
1¼ cups sugar
1½ teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

And here is the complete recipe — Enjoy!

~~~~~

  The   Jam   (S)pot

Puts the Spotlight on a Pomona’s Jam Maker
Katharine Salzberger, Jam Maker in Chief for her small and successful business (Oh, Wow! Gourmet Foods) in Longmont, Colorado, began making jam in 2013. Looking for a way to preserve her garden produce, especially the fresh herbs, she came up with low-sugar “herbal fruit spreads,” like Blueberry Basil, Strawberry Mint, Peach Ginger, and Four Berry Rosemary.

After starting with grocery store pectin, Katharine got frustrated and found Pomona’s Pectin online. She says, “Using Pomona’s changed my business. . . .We were no longer slaves to thermometers and could easily scale our recipes. Now our products set properly each and every time. We love the idea of making a very small test batch and then being able to instantly scale the recipe as needed.

“Our most popular flavor is Four Berry Rosemary. When people taste it, they can’t help but exclaim ‘Oh, Wow!’”

Blueberry Basil is popular too.Katharine’s recipe for a Blueberry Basil Frozen Margarita is made with her jam. 

Oh, Wow! Gourmet Foods jams are available both online on Facebook and at local farmers’ markets (click on Locations tab on their website) in Boulder, Longmont, and Frederick, CO.

Continue reading about Katharine’s business and her advice for starting your own jam-making business . . .

Pomona’s News

Connie and Mary Lou had 2 winter projects:

1. My Jam Didn’t Jell — Can I Fix It? is now available for your problem-solving pleasure on the Learn Page of our website. Feel free to give it a look before calling the Jamline. But, as always, we are happy to speak with you when you call.

2. We re-organized the website FAQs. Our goal was to make it easier for you to find answers to your questions. We hope we accomplished it!

Canadians can now buy Pomona’s directly from our website. Just go to the Order Page and click on Canada.

Looking for more summer jam recipes? Here are some good ones from our website:

Chocolate Berry Jam
Raspberry-Blueberry Jam
Strawberry-Jalapeno Jam
Ginger-Peach Jam
Strawberry Jam Sweetened with Juice Concentrate
RhubyRazz Jam
Apricot-Pineapple Jam
Honeyed Strawberry-Ginger Preserves
Gooseberry Jelly
Chokecherry Jelly

or just visit our website Recipes page for many more!

~~~~~ We Love Your Feedback! Let us know what you think of Jam Notes. Are there jamming-related topics you would like to read more about? Do you have a recipe for jam, or anything else you make with Pomona’s, to share? Email info@pomonapectin.com, and Happy Jamming!

Master Food Preservers Have a Mission – Teaching About Canning Safety

With the current explosion of interest in home food preservation – be it pickling, jamming, fermenting, or freezing – where are home preservers supposed to go for answers to their questions? Who out there has the most up-to-date understanding of food safety issues and approved practices?

Yes, you guessed it – your local Master Food Preserver (or MFP), trained by your local County Extension Office, and now a willing volunteer to answer your questions over the phone; teach classes; staff tables at Farmers’ Markets, County Fairs, and other such venues; and even make presentations to church groups and other organizations.

Never heard of a Master Food Preserver? Well, either had I until I started working with my sister Connie to bring you Pomona’s Pectin. So I decided to interview a few MFPs to find out who they are, how they got to be MFPs, what they do, and how you, if you’re interested, can follow in their footsteps.

I heard from MFPs in Washington, California, Idaho, Indiana, and Maine. Below is a summary of what I learned. For more detail about a particular state, click on that state. For information about states not included, search the internet, give a call to your County Extension Office, or go to their website.

What is an MFP and how do you become one? MFPs complete extensive training: usually spending around 40 hours in the classroom, studying assigned reading materials, and participating in hands-on training. The focus is food safety and food preserving methods. To be certified, an MFP must pass a written exam and commit to a number of volunteer hours in the community.

An MFP’s mission is then to help educate the public in a variety of ways, under the supervision of their Country Extension Office. To become an MFP, you need to learn about your local County Extension program, sign up, and likely pay a small fee for materials.

What are the qualities of a good MFP? Good MFPs: (1) have more than a passing interest in food safety and food preservation; (2) have the desire and time to volunteer for community service; (3) are curious, analytical, and personable; (4) like to teach and can communicate well; (5) have a passion for food preservation, people and fun!

Becoming an MFP means joining a community of like-minded individuals, both men and women. If you’re interested, there’s no time like the present!

Tales from the Jamline . . .

Rrrrring! goes the telephone. “HELP,” says the caller — “I used Turbinado sugar to make my jam and the pectin clumped when I added it to the hot fruit mixture. What happened?

Because Pomona’s Pectin is pure pectin powder and not already mixed with sugar or dextrose, it will clump when it comes into contact with liquid. That’s why it’s necessary to mix the pectin thoroughly into the sweetener or dissolve it in hot water or juice in a blender before adding it to the hot fruit mixture.

Photo by warrenski flickr.com

With Turbinado, or any other large-crystal sugar, first you need to pulverize it to a smaller grain in your food processor or blender, and THEN measure out the amount of sugar you want. This both insures that your measurements are accurate and that the pectin mixes in well.

If your pectin clumped when you added it to your fruit mixture, and you have chewy clumps in your jam or your jam didn’t jell well, visit the new page on our website: My Jam or Jelly Didn’t Jell — Can I Fix It? And scroll down to the Sweetener Problems section.

Photo by warrenski flickr.com http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ 

~~~~~

Pomona’s Partners

Pomona’s is a small, family-owned and run enterprise. Three of us do it all (Connie Sumberg, Mary Lou Sumberg and Paul Rooney), along with our wonderful packaging and fulflillment partner in Denver, CO, Western Innovations.

~~~~~

Copyright © , All rights reserved. Jam Notes is published 3 times each year: February, June, and September,  with occasional short updates containing new recipes in April, August, and November.                                        

 

California Master Food Preserver Program

Four Master Food Preservers from California shared their experiences with us. The information below is a composite of their answers to the interview questions.

What exactly is a Master Food Preserver?
In California, University of California Cooperative Extension Master Food Preserver volunteers (MFPs) are unpaid staff members of the University of California and work through the UC Cooperative Extension program (UCCE) to educate the community on the safe practices of food preservation, including pickling, fermenting, dehydrating, canning and more. We are under the umbrella of the University of California Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources (UCANR).

A Master Food Preserver has participated in a training program (includes reading materials, lectures, tests, and hands-on training) taught by the cooperative extension office in their county. The program’s purpose is to promote safe home food preservation by training individuals (MFP’s), who then become volunteer teachers/advisors in the community. The emphasis of the program is volunteerism. There is an annual commitment to volunteer and continuing education hours that must be maintained to be a certified Master Food Preserver.

Some of the activities MFPs are chartered with:
• Answering consumer phone and email questions about food preservation
• Working in the community as local food preservation specialists
• Staffing information booths and demonstrating USDA-approved home food preservation methods at local fairs and events
• Writing articles for local publications and newsletters
• Teaching classes on various food preservation and food safety topics
• Testing pressure canner gauges for accurate use

Who do you recommend to become an MFP?
Anyone who enjoys, or thinks they would enjoy, learning about food preservation and also sharing that knowledge in and around their community. But, it’s important to have more than just a passing interest in food preservation because the purpose of the program is to become certified to teach others and the instruction (lectures, quizzes, final exam, etc.) is approached a bit like a college class. Also, there is a charge for materials. Unless a person is prepared to complete the requirements and then “give back to the community” upon completion, I would not recommend it. The MFP program is not recommended for someone who is simply looking for food preservation classes; the MFP program is designed to give back to our community.

What do you love about being a Master Food Preserver?
I love being an MFP – for a long list of reasons! Contributing to the community in the role of “trusted advisor” is very gratifying. I get to talk to a diverse group of people about their different preserving interests and projects. Living where we do in California, we have a wonderful legacy of agriculture and home food production, and I see the richness of it in these conversations. For example, last summer we staffed a booth at a local pumpkin festival and I had a conversation with a gentleman who described his grandfather’s recipe for pickled figs. (Fig trees grow here like weeds.) The pride that the gentleman had in his heirloom recipe was clear and it was awesome to hear about it.

Did it lead to a paying job or a volunteer job for you?
For all, it is a volunteer job. In California, MFPs are technically not permitted to make any income or earnings if we advertise ourselves as members of the MFP group.

Where can someone get more information about the U. of California Cooperative Extension Master Food Preserver program?
Currently, the process to become a certified MFP in California varies among the counties that have the program (Humboldt, Central Sierra, Sacramento, San Bernardino, Orange County, and Los Angeles). Effective the first of this year it is now a “state-wide” program and there will be more counties coming on-line in the future. Statewide standards are in process and will be in place next year. Because of the recent surge in interest in food preservation, UC Extension is ramping up to start new MFP volunteer programs throughout the state. Sacramento County was the first in California in 1983.

This link will take you to the U. of California Cooperative Extension Master Food Preserver webpage.

Idaho Master Food Preserver Information

Eight Master Food Preservers (also known as Master Food Safety Advsiors) from Idaho shared their experiences with us. The information below is a composite of their answers to the interview questions.

What exactly is a Master Food Preserver?
A volunteer who has attended 6 weeks of classes taught by trained food safety faculty of the University of Idaho Extension program in order to be certified to educate others in food safety, food preparation and preservation, and food-related emergency preparedness. They have passed the final test and completed the required 30 hours of volunteer work in the community in their first year. After that, they are required to complete 20 hours of volunteer work each year.

Who do you recommend to become an MFP?
Someone who loves food and is interested in food safety. It’s important to have good people skills, be willing to work with anyone, and be able to explain information clearly. An MFP needs to have the time to complete the volunteer hours required and the desire to give back to the community.

What is enjoyable to you about being a Master Food Preserver?
Ongoing monthly trainings on a wide variety of topics; knowing how to preserve food that is safe for me and my family and feeling knowledgeable to share safety information with others; friendships with other volunteers; doing the volunteer work itself; networking with other preserving “foodies.”

Did it lead to a paying job or a volunteer job for you?
For all, it is a volunteer job.

Where can someone get more information about the U. of Idaho Extension Master Food Preserver program?
Look in the newspaper; watch the website for signup times; the Western Idaho Fair; visiting the extension office; a flyer in the library.

This link will take you to the U. of Idaho Extension Master Food Preserver webpage.

Indiana Master Food Preserver Information

Jody Taylor, a Master Food Preserver in Franklin, Indiana, and member of the Johnson County Homemakers’ Extension Club since 2010, had this to say about the Indiana Master Food Preserver program.

What exactly is a Master Food Preserver?
Someone who has successfully completed the Master Food Preserver Training Program. The program in our area is offered by the local extension educator through the Purdue Extension Service/Johnson County Indiana. The course consists of a 40-hour training program, which includes lecture, group discussion, hands-on lab, and preservation processing, and concludes with a written exam assessing one’s knowledge of the information learned. The purpose of the class is to increase the participants knowledge of the following areas:

a. Food Safety
b. Freezing Foods
c. Boiling Water Bath Canning
d. Pressure Canning
e. Drying Foods
f. Fermented and Pickled Products
g. Jams and Jellie Products

How did you become a Master Food Preserver?
I originally found out about our local MFP program in our local newspaper. I became interested in order to further my knowledge of food safety and canning. I grew up watching and helping my aunt with canning on her farm during the summers of my childhood. After moving to the country with my own family and growing fruits and vegetables, I had the desire to preserve the food we were raising and pursue a level of self-sufficiency.

By taking the MFP course, I began my journey with home canning, which has led to my involvement with other courses offered by our state extension program. These have included: Backyard Fruit Growers, Home Based Food Vendor, Introduction to Starting a Specialty Food Business in Indiana, Master Gardening Program, and a Pastured Poultry Series Webinar. However MFP is definitely an onsite, hands-on, learning experience and requires a substantial time commitment, but is well worth the effort. Indiana is blessed with Purdue University, which offers a wealth of knowledge and resources to our state.

What do you do as an MFP?
As an MFP, I utilize the training I received to make products for our family that include salsas, pickes, relishes, canned fruit, pie fillings, flavored vinegars, jams/jellies, fruit syrups and sauces, and dried fruits/vegetables and herbs.

Who do you recommend to become an MFP?
Anyone with an interest in the area may apply for the class whether she/he is a beginner or experienced home food preservationist. I would recommend becoming an MFP to anyone with a desire to can whether for family or the public. Through the years, canning has become a “dying art.” No longer is it a necessity for survival and those who grew up with it are dying.

It is really time for those of us remaining to revitalize the spirit of independence and self-sufficiency that comes with growing and/or preparing our own food. Not only is it more fresh, delicious, and economical, but it grounds us to the world we live in. No longer must we be just consumers, we can produce!

Did it lead to a paying job or a volunteer job for you?
Being an MFP has given me critical food safety knowledge so I can provide safe, delicious products to my family and our local community through my involvement with our local farmers’ market. This has led to my own small business start-up company known as Boys And Berry Farm, LLC. The primary products offered by my company are a wide variety of jams and jellies. Current inventory includes over 40 varieties of fruit-based jams and also pepper jellies.

As a home-based vendor, I am limited in what I can sell to the public based on our Indiana legislation, House Enrolled Act 1309. This states that home-based vendors are limited to high-acid canning via boiling water bath due to public safety concerns, primarily regarding botulism. For example, home pressure-canned green beans are not allowed. Canning of that nature requires a retail procedure and a commercial kitchen for processing.

My bio includes being a physical therapist, but I have been a stay-at-home mom for a number of years, raising our three boys. Launching my home-based business has turned my hobby into a profitable endeavor from which I receive a tremendous amount of enjoyment and creative fulfillment. It has been a very rewarding experience as a way of connecting with our local community.

 

Maine Master Food Preserver Information

Allison Carroll Duffy, author of Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin and her own CanningCraft website, and a Master Food Preserver in Maine, had this to say about the Maine Master Food Preserver program.

What exactly is a Master Food Preserver?
A Master Food Preserver is someone who is trained through a Master Food Preserver Program, offered through certain state extension offices. It is an in depth program, about 40 or so hours of training, over a period of several months. Training includes many aspects of food preservation, such as canning, drying, freezing, fermenting, and root cellaring. After completing the training, first year MFPs are required to give at least 20 hours of volunteer service as an MFP. In subsequent years, MFPs are required to give a minimum of 10 hours of volunteer service per year to remain in good standing as an MFP.

How did you become a Master Food Preserver?
I had been growing and preserving food for almost 10 years prior to my MFP training, but all of my food preservation learning had been through books or learning by doing on my own. I always loved preserving and decided I wanted more in-depth knowledge on the subject, so I decided to take the MFP training course.

How did you find out about the program in Maine?
I found out about the MFP program though a mention on a group listserve I participate in. Someone who is interested can call the Maine MFP program at the University of Maine Cooperative Extension in Falmouth, Maine or visit the U. of Maine Master Food Preserver web page.

What specifically do you do as an MFP?
I volunteer at various events organized by our local MFP program — for example, I might staff the MFP booth at a fair or do a preserving demo at a local event.

Who do you recommend to become an MFP?
Anyone with at least a little bit of food preservation experience who is interested in deepening their knowledge of food preservation, and who has an interest in sharing their knowledge with others. The MFP training does not require any previous knowledge, but because it’s a very in-depth course and requires an additional volunteer commitment, I think it’s a good idea to be sure that you really enjoy food preservation before making the commitment.

Did it lead to a paying job or a volunteer job for you?
I continue to do some volunteer work as an MFP, but my hope in becoming an MFP was always that it would eventually lead to paying work. And fortunately it did. I wrote a book on canning and jam-making in partnership with the folks at Pomona’s Pectin, and I teach classes and workshops on food preservation. Prior to taking my MFP course, I already had a background in food, and my MFP training was a great addition to my education, really contributing to getting my food-related work/business off the ground.

Washington Master Food Preserver Program

Four Master Food Preservers from Washington shared their experiences with us. The information below is a composite of their answers to the interview questions.

What exactly is a Master Food Preserver?
In Washington State, Master Food Preservers are trained volunteers who conduct outreach education through Washington State University (WSU). In order to be a trained volunteer, a person must complete the training program (over 30 hours of classroom instruction plus laboratory), and complete oral and written exams. Once certified as a volunteer, an MFP is considered an unpaid employee of WSU, and so is covered by liability insurance while conducting business.

MFPs commit to 50 hours of volunteer time as part of the program, providing assistance to County and State Extension faculty in educating the public on up-to-date, research-based food safety/preservation techniques, with an emphasis on handling and preserving food safely for optimum quality. No specific education is necessary, but you must be 18 years old.

Volunteers must be re-certified every year. The MFP program was started in Washington State, being modeled after the Master Gardener program. The first year of the program was 1976.

What specifically do MFPs do?
We staff information booths at farmers’ markets, county fairs, and festivals; teach classes; give demonstrations; mentor new canners; write blogs; do Facebook and Pinterest pages. We answer questions from phone calls, test pressure gauges, distribute print materials, do television and radio shows. We may do presentations to church groups or other volunteer organizations

Who do you recommend to become an MFP?
Anyone who has a passion for food preservation, people, and fun! Someone who can deliberate and is curious, analytical, and personable. Our job is serious business, but we can have fun while doing it!

What do you love about being a Master Food Preserver?
Talking to the public about their experiences and how they might improve their food preservation practices. The sense of community and the willingness of MFPs to help others. Being a “citizen scientist” with expertise in food preservation.

Where can someone get more information about the Washington State Master Food Preserver program?
Contact your county Cooperative Extension office. Twenty-five years ago there were MFP programs all across the state. Today there are only two active offices – Benton County and Clark County – call one of those.

This link will take you to the Clark County Master Food Preserver webpage. This link will take you to the Benton County Master Food Preserver webpage.

CanningCraft Creates: Sweet Cherry-Rhubarb Jam

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

I love rhubarb season. Here in Maine, rhubarb is one of the earliest fresh green edibles to emerge from the soil each spring, so it’s always a much-anticipated treat. It’s delicious in pie, in jam, or simply stewed with a little honey.

Its sour, slightly astringent tang also makes it a perfect partner for sweeter fruits. Strawberries and rhubarb are a classic combination, but lately I’ve been itching to try some other pairings. Sweet cherries are a favorite of mine, and while they’re not in season here in Maine yet, some readers in warmer climates may have local cherries available, so I thought I’d give Cherry-Rhubarb Jam a go.

 

cherries

And what a treat it is! The jam is a beautiful deep, rich red, and the cherries are sweet enough to offset the tartness of the rhubarb without having to add a lot of extra sugar. Be sure to use sweet cherries (Bing cherries, for example), not sour cherries.

To remove the cherry pits, you can use a pitter if you have one, but it’s not necessary; simply slice the cherries in half with a paring knife and pick out the pits. To chop the pitted cherries, I use a chef’s knife, but you can also chop them in a food processor.

cutting rhubarbAs for the rhubarb, select fresh, firm stalks. Most rhubarb for sale at farmers’ markets or grocery stores has already been trimmed, but if not (or, if you’re harvesting it yourself) be sure to trim it thoroughly, completely removing and discarding all leaves. The stalks are the only part you want to use, as the leaves themselves are poisonous.

 

trimmed rhubarbTypically, the stalks are similar in size to celery stalks, though this can vary. The color varies also, from green to red and anywhere in between. For the deepest red jam, select stalks that are red rather than green. In terms of taste and texture, though, both work equally well – and both make delicious jam.

 

Try this jam swirled into yogurt or on top of vanilla ice cream . . . oh so good!

cherry-rhubarb jam-yogurt

 Sweet Cherry-Rhubarb Jam

Sweet Cherry-Rhubarb Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Sweet Cherry-Rhubarb Jam Ingredients

1¼ pounds sweet cherries
1 pound trimmed rhubarb stalks
½ cup water
2 tablespoons lemon juice
3 teaspoons calcium water
1¼ cups sugar
2 ½ teaspoons Pomona’s Universal Pectin Powder

Sweet Cherry-Rhubarb Jam Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Rinse the cherries, remove and discard stems and pits, then chop the cherries.

3. Rinse the rhubarb stalks, slice them into thin, length-wise strips, then dice. In a saucepan, combine diced rhubarb with the ½ cup of water and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer, stirring occasionally, for approximately 5 minutes, or until rhubarb is soft. Remove pan from heat, then mash the rhubarb.

4. Measure 2 cups of the chopped cherries, and 2 cups of the mashed rhubarb. If you have extra, save it for another use. Pour the measured amounts of cherries and rhubarb into a sauce pan. Add lemon juice and calcium water and stir to combine.

5. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and the pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

6. Bring the cherry-rhubarb mixture to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return the mixture to a boil, then remove it from the heat.

7. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jam, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

8. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

9. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

10. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Strawberry-Vanilla Preserves

StrawberryVanillapreserves smallExcerpted from Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin by Allison Carroll Duffy (Fair Winds Press, June 2013).

Allison says: With ripe, in-season strawberries, combined with a smooth, exotic note of fresh vanilla, this preserve is nothing short of heavenly. It will add a bit of flair to the breakfast table (or bagel) of course, but it’s also great in desserts—try it on top of a biscuit with a bit of whipped cream for a spectacular strawberry-vanilla shortcake! The berries in this preserve tend to float to the top during canning, so mix it up well before serving.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Strawberry-Vanilla Preserves Ingredients

2¼ pounds strawberries
½ cup water
1 vanilla bean
1½ teaspoons calcium water
1¼ cups sugar
1½ teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Strawberry-Vanilla Preserves Directions

1. Wash your jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring canner to a rolling boil, and boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize them. (Add 1 extra minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.) Reduce heat and allow jars to remain in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan, heat to a low simmer, and hold until ready to use.

2. Rinse strawberries and remove stems.

3. Combine strawberries and the ½ cup of water in a large saucepan. Using a paring knife, slice the vanilla bean in half lengthwise and scrape out the seeds. Add the vanilla seeds and the bean pod itself to the strawberries. Bring the mixture to a boil over high heat, reduce heat, and simmer, covered, for 3 to 4 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir carefully—you don’t want to crush the berries. Remove from heat.

4. Measure 4 cups of the cooked strawberry mixture (saving any extra for another use), and return the measured quantity to the saucepan. Add calcium water and mix well.

5. In a separate bowl, combine sugar and pectin powder. Mix thoroughly and set aside.

6. Bring strawberry mixture back to a full boil over high heat. Slowly add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring constantly. Continue to stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve pectin while the preserves come back up to a boil. Once the preserves return to a full boil, remove the pan from the heat. Using tongs, carefully remove the vanilla bean pod from the preserves and discard.

7. Can Your Preserves: Remove jars from canner and ladle hot preserves into hot jars, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, put on lids and screw bands, and tighten to fingertip tight. Lower filled jars into canner, ensuring jars are not touching each other and are covered with at least 1 to 2 inches of water. Place lid on canner, return to a rolling boil, and process for 10 minutes (adjusting for altitude if necessary). Turn off heat and allow canner to sit untouched for 5 minutes, then remove jars and allow to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Confirm that jars have sealed, then store properly.

TIP: Shapely Strawberries
Unlike jams, which usually require that you mash the fruit, when you’re making preserves, the idea is to keep individual pieces of fruit (or uniformly cut pieces of fruit) mostly whole and intact. For strawberries, small or average-size berries are ideal, though larger berries will work—simply slice them in half if they are too big. To help avoid mashing delicate fruit unintentionally, use a wider saucepan so that fruit has room to spread out and cook evenly without a lot of stirring. And when you do stir, stir with a back-and-forth motion, rather than an up-and-down motion—this way you’ll be less likely to crush the berries.

Recipe by Allison Carroll Duffy

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

Print

Sweet Cherry-Rhubarb Jam

cherry-rhubarb jam-yogurtSweet Cherry-Rhubarb Jam is a low-sugar cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy. This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin.

She says: The jam is a beautiful deep, rich red, and the cherries are sweet enough to offset the tartness of the rhubarb without having to add a lot of extra sugar. Be sure to use sweet cherries (Bing cherries, for example), not sour cherries.Try this jam swirled into yogurt or on top of vanilla ice cream . . . oh so good!

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Sweet Cherry-Rhubarb Jam Ingredients

1¼ pounds sweet cherries
1 pound trimmed rhubarb stalks
½ cup water
2 tablespoons lemon juice
3 teaspoons calcium water
1¼ cups sugar
2 ½ teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Sweet Cherry-Rhubarb Jam Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Rinse the cherries, remove and discard stems and pits, then chop the cherries.

3. Rinse the rhubarb stalks, slice them into thin, length-wise strips, then dice. In a saucepan, combine diced rhubarb with the ½ cup of water and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer, stirring occasionally, for approximately 5 minutes, or until rhubarb is soft. Remove pan from heat, then mash the rhubarb.

4. Measure 2 cups of the chopped cherries, and 2 cups of the mashed rhubarb. If you have extra, save it for another use. Pour the measured amounts of cherries and rhubarb into a sauce pan. Add lemon juice and calcium water and stir to combine.

5. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and the pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

6. Bring the cherry-rhubarb mixture to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return the mixture to a boil, then remove it from the heat.

7. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jam, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

8. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

9. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

10. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Blueberry Basil Frozen Margarita

Blueberry Basil Frozen Margarita

Blueberry Basil Frozen Margarita

Katharine Salzberger of Oh, Wow! Gourmet Foods shares her recipe for a cool summer drink.

You can purchase Oh, Wow! Gourmet Foods Blueberry Basil herbal fruit spread on their Facebook Page.

Blueberry Basil Frozen Margarita Ingredients

1 part of your favorite tequila
1 part Triple Sec
1 part Margarita Mix
1 Tablespoon of Oh, Wow! Gourmet Foods Blueberry Basil herbal fruit spread
Ice

Blueberry Basil Frozen Margarita Directions

Place all ingredients in a blender and blend away. Pour into your favorite Margarita glass (rimmed with sugar optional) and enjoy!

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Oh, Wow! Gourmet Foods — Starting a Jam-Making Business

Katharine at the marketKatharine Salzberger of Oh, Wow! Gourmet Foods responds to a few questions about her business and her tips for getting started on your own.

When did you first make jam?
We began making jam in 2013 as an exercise in canning food from our own garden. When we gave it to friends and family, they all insisted we should sell it. Our business started almost immediately after. We make low sugar herbal fruit spreads, not “traditional sugar” jams. When we are doing a tasting demo, we tell customers that with the low amount of sugar and the addition of fresh herbs, our herbal fruit spreads can be used in recipes both sweet and savory, from breakfast to cocktails. They are always amazed when we suggest “cocktails.” (See Katharine’s recipe for Blueberry Basil Frozen Margaritas.)

Would you like to share something about your creative process?
The herbs really are the inspiration for our flavor combinations. We grow our own herbs for our products and we are working with Colorado farmers to source fruit from as nearby as possible. It’s an important component for our customers to know where their food came from. There are quite a few “Locavores” in Colorado.

Fruit n Herbs for Logo

Do you have any advice for someone just getting started in the jam-making business?
Make sure you have a pretty good sized savings account if you want to go commercial. Keep in mind all the licenses, tests, equipment, graphic design, and labels needed. Also try to get into a certified commercial kitchen with a large kettle and filling machine as soon as possible to bring down your overall costs per jar. It will also reduce the amount of time you spend making your products, thereby allowing more time to round up more business.

Four Berry RosemaryAnything else you’d like to share with our readers?
Our exquisite spreads are generously packed with at least twice as much fruit as sugar, allowing the natural sweetness and fragrance of the fruit to come through in every luscious bite. The layered flavors are achieved by leaving the fresh herbs in the spread to provide the maximum herbaceous flavor experience possible.

We were able to secure a vendor space at the Boulder County Farmers Markets, the most popular and prestigious Farmers Markets in Colorado … and we did it on our first attempt after less than a year in business with the help of Pomona Pectin!

We at Pomona’s Pectin say, Congratulations Katharine — and thanks for sharing your story!

Raspberry-Blueberry Jam

Raspberry-Blueberry JamRaspberry-Blueberry Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin: Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Raspberry-Blueberry Jam Ingredients

2 cups mashed raspberries
2 cups mashed blueberries
2 teaspoons calcium water
2 Tablespoons lemon juice
½ cup up to 1 cup honey or ¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
(I used 1¼ cups sugar.)
2 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Raspberry-Blueberry Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure mashed raspberries and blueberries into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and lemon juice, and mix well.

4. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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WOW — Where Do I Start?

I have just finished processing my first batch with Pomona’s Petcin and it looks lovely. It is especially nice that I can try small batches before jumping in with both feet.

I haven’t tasted it yet and can’t imagine how it can be sweet with HALF the sugar, but it is surely worth a try.

It seemed like a lot of fussing around when I first read the instructions, but as you know, it is NOT. Now I am excited to try some other jams and use up the calcium water. I have shared what little I know with others who are into ‘jams’.

The flexbility that your product gives us is unknown with other pectins and I have a feeling this will be a long and happy relationship.

The Next Day:  We had the jam this morning with our breakfast in the back yard and it was even more amazing than I had hoped for!!! It was plenty sweet enough (even for old ‘sweet tooth me’). I will actually cut the sugar down even more next time (I had used the maximum being so sure it wouldn’t be enough!) and see how that is; I am guessing I won’t even notice the difference.

I made the Blueberry-Lavender Jam (with last year’s sad looking blueberries and some organic lavender) and it blew our minds. Next it will be the Apricot-Lavender. This is definitely the best tasting jam I have ever had.

This product should revolutionize how people make jam. I was an old school cook and believed that we needed all that sugar to preserve the product and achieve gel. Boy, was I wrong! I will never look back and am now in search of someone I can offload my ‘regular pectin’ to as well as the huge bag of sugar I bought. I won’t be using very much for my yearly jam making.

This product allows us to experiment and use different sweeteners, which was NEVER possible the old way. And it is also good value for money as you can keep the calcium water for months and make more than one batch per package depending on size and type.

You have really made my day/week/month/year!

Thanks for a GREAT product — and I love the recipes and blog!!

Yours truly,

Judi Gibbs
Vancouver, BC, Canada
May 15, 2014

Lemon Jam

photo by Michel Scalvenzi http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

photo by Michel Scalvenzi
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Lemon Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Lemon Jam Ingredients

2 cups fresh squeezed lemon juice with pulp
2 cups water (lemon juice is too acid to jell if you do not cut it with water)
3 teaspoons calcium water
2 cups sugar OR 1 cup honey
3 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Lemon Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure lemon juice with pulp into sauce pan.

3. Add water and calcium water, and mix well.

4. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Pomona’s Pectin Jam Notes Update: Kumquat Marmalade

 

April 2014 – Jam Notes Update

Kumquat Marmalade — Winter Calls to Spring

By Allison Carroll Duffy, author of Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin

Every so often, a package of fresh fruit will arrive on my parents’ doorstep – an unexpected gift from their friend Garo who lives in California. He’s sent them fresh figs from his backyard tree several times, and a month or so ago they received a box full of gorgeous orange kumquats. They love getting the fruit but, not being jam makers, they sometimes find themselves with more than they can use.
Fortunately, I often end up with their extras! When my mom came to visit a few weeks back, she stashed a good-sized bag of the kumquats in my refrigerator, and mentioned off-handedly that maybe I could make marmalade. Later, my husband pulled out the bag and sliced up a couple of the fruits for all of us to sample. What a welcome treat they were!
In the midst of a very snowy Maine winter (yes, we still had a lot of snow and freezing temperatures throughout March!) the small golden-orange oval-shaped fruits were truly lovely to behold. What’s more, never having tried kumquats before, I was very surprised to discover that the peel is slightly sweet, and not at all bitter, while the flesh is a little sour – quite unlike other types of citrus. As soon as I tasted one, I realized that marmalade was exactly what I wanted to make with them.
I’m a big fan of marmalade, but there’s no question it can be a little bitter – especially if the recipe includes a lot of peel. Kumquat marmalade typically uses the whole fruit, including all the peel, and yet I find it to be much less bitter than other marmalades, due to the sweetness of the peel. What’s more, kumquat peels are quite thin, so they get very soft and break down a lot during the cooking process, making the texture a bit more like jam than most marmalades are. 

So, if you are not normally a fan of marmalade but are craving a bit of citrus, this is the marmalade to try! I used Nagami kumquats for this recipe, one of the more popular and widely available varieties, but other types will work as well. If your local grocery store does not carry them, specialty food stores and Asian markets often have a good selection during the winter and spring months.

Kumquat Marmalade Ingredients

2 pounds kumquats
2 cups water
¼ cup lemon juice
2 teaspoons calcium water
1½ cups sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Full blog post & recipe here.

Additional new recipes on our website:
Strawberry Jam Sweetened with Juice Concentrate
Strawberry Jam — Unsweetened, Sweetened with Stevia Concentrate, or Very Lightly Sweetened
Guava Jam
Guava Jelly
Frozen Lemon or Lime Pie 

Have you or a friend had a problem with jell fail?
Take a look at our new website page: My Jam or Jelly Didn’t Jell — Can I Fix It?
First figure out why it didn’t jell; then learn, step-by-step, how to fix it.

Did you miss the February issue of Jam Notes with Allison’s Cold Comfort Jelly recipe and Becky Hoff’s recipes for Rose Hip Jam and Blue Spice Rombauer Jam Cake? It’s not too late!

Spring is on its way, finally — thank you for subscribing to Jam Notes and, of course, Happy Jamming from the Pomona’s Partners — Connie, Paul & Mary Lou.

Write to us at info@pomonapectin.com

Copyright © , All rights reserved.

Kumquat Marmalade

DSCN3858Kumquat Marmalade is a low-sugar cooked marmalade made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy. This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin.

She says:

If you are not normally a fan of marmalade but are craving a bit of citrus, this is the marmalade to try!

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Kumquat Marmalade Ingredients

DSCN38122 pounds kumquats
2 cups water
¼ cup lemon juice
2 teaspoons calcium water
1½ cups sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Kumquat Marmalade Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Thoroughly rinse the kumquats. Then, slice each kumquat width-wise into several thin, quarter-sized rounds (a small, serrated knife works well for this). Remove and discard the seeds as you are working.

DSCN3829

3. Combine the sliced kumquats and the 2 cups of water in a saucepan, cover with a lid, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes, then remove from the heat.

DSCN38364. Measure 4 cups of the cooked kumquat mixture. If you have extra, save it for another use. Pour the measured amount of the kumquat mixture into a sauce pan. Add lemon juice and calcium water and stir to combine.

 

 

5. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and the pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

6. Bring the kumquat mixture to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return the mixture to a boil, then remove it from the heat.

7. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with marmalade, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

8. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

9. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

10. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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CanningCraft Creates: Kumquat Marmalade

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

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Here’s Allison:

Every so often, a package of fresh fruit will arrive on my parents’ doorstep – an unexpected gift from their friend Garo who lives in California. He’s sent them fresh figs from his backyard tree several times, and a month or so ago they received a box full of gorgeous orange kumquats. They love getting the fruit but, not being jam makers, they sometimes find themselves with more than they can use.

Fortunately, I often end up with their extras! When my mom came to visit a few weeks back, she stashed a good-sized bag of the kumquats in my refrigerator, and mentioned off-handedly that maybe I could make marmalade. Later, my husband pulled out the bag and sliced up a couple of the fruits for all of us to sample. What a welcome treat they were!

DSCN3812

In the midst of a very snowy Maine winter (yes, we still had a lot of snow and freezing temperatures throughout March!) the small golden-orange oval-shaped fruits were truly lovely to behold. What’s more, never having tried kumquats before, I was very surprised to discover that the peel is slightly sweet, and not at all bitter, while the flesh is a little sour – quite unlike other types of citrus. As soon as I tasted one, I realized that marmalade was exactly what I wanted to make with them.

I’m a big fan of marmalade, but there’s no question it can be a little bitter – especially if the recipe includes a lot of peel. Kumquat marmalade typically uses the whole fruit, including all the peel, and yet I find it to be much less bitter than other marmalades, due to the sweetness of the peel. What’s more, kumquat peels are quite thin, so they get very soft and break down a lot during the cooking process, making the texture a bit more like jam than most marmalades are.

So, if you are not normally a fan of marmalade but are craving a bit of citrus, this is the marmalade to try! I used Nagami kumquats for this recipe, one of the more popular and widely available varieties, but other types will work as well. If your local grocery store does not carry them, specialty food stores and Asian markets often have a good selection during the winter and spring months.

Kumquat Marmalade

DSCN3858Kumquat Marmalade is a low-sugar cooked marmalade made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Kumquat Marmalade Ingredients

2 pounds kumquats
2 cups water
¼ cup lemon juice
2 teaspoons calcium water
1½ cups sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Kumquat Marmalade Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Thoroughly rinse the kumquats. Then, slice each kumquat width-wise into several thin, quarter-sized rounds (a small, serrated knife works well for this). Remove and discard the seeds as you are working.

DSCN3829

3. Combine the sliced kumquats and the 2 cups of water in a saucepan, cover with a lid, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes, then remove from the heat.

4. Measure 4 cups of the cooked kumquat mixture. If you have extra, save it for another use. Pour the measured amount of the kumquat mixture into a sauce pan. Add lemon juice and calcium water and stir to combine.

5. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and the pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

DSCN38366. Bring the kumquat mixture to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return the mixture to a boil, then remove it from the heat.

7. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with marmalade, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

8. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

9. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

10. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Tomato-Shrimp Aspic

Tomato-Shrimp Aspic is jelled with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives. See below for where to buy.

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Tomato-Shrimp Aspic Ingredients

1/3 cup diced scallions
1/3 cup diced celery
1/3 cup diced green pepper
4¼ oz. drained, cooked shrimp
1 bay leaf
paprika, garlic, red or black pepper, celery salt, tarragon, all to taste
1 Tablespoon butter
3 cups tomato juice
3 teaspoons calcium-water
3 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Tomato-Shrimp Aspic Directions

1. Saute vegetables, shrimp, and herbs in butter; remove bay leaf; arrange in a mold.

2. Measure tomato juice into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and stir well.

4. Bring tomato juice to a full boil. Turn off heat.

5. Put 1 cup boiling tomato juice in cup for immersion blender, or in food processor, or in blender. Add pectin. It is very important to vent the lid (if there is one) to let steam out. Don’t use an enclosed blender that can’t be vented. Blend for 10 seconds, then stop and scrape down the sides so all pectin clumps are in or on the liquid. Blend for a full minute until all powder is totally dissolved.

6. Return tomato juice in pan to a boil. Add the pectinized tomato juice and stir to distribute the pectin throughout all the juice.

7. Pour hot juice over vegetables and shrimp in mold. Let cool then refrigerate until set. Unmold onto bed of lettuce.

Options:
For a vegetarian or vegan aspic, omit the shrimp.
It is fine to vary the seasoning according to your own taste.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Unsweetened Fruit Juice Jello

Unsweetened Jello is made with unsweetened fruit juice and Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener or no sweetener at all. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 cups

Before You Begin: Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Unsweetened Jello Ingredients

4 cups unsweetened fruit juice
4 teaspoons calcium water
¼ cup lemon juice if required (See Note in Step 2 below.)
4 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Unsweetened Jello Directions

1. Measure juice into sauce pan.

2. Add calcium water and lemon juice (if using) and mix well.
Note: Apple juice & white grape juice require lemon juice.

3. Bring juice to a boil. Turn off heat.

4. Put 1 cup boiling juice in cup for immersion blender, or in food processor, or in blender. Add pectin. It is very important to vent the lid (if there is one) to let steam out. Don’t use an enclosed blender that can’t be vented. Blend for 10 seconds, then stop and scrape down the sides so all pectin clumps are in or on the liquid. Then blend for a full minute until all powder is totally dissolved.

5. Turn heat on and bring juice in pan back to a boil. Add pectin-juice to pan of hot juice. Stir well while mixture returns to full boil. Remove from heat.

6. Pour hot jello into serving bowl or individual dishes. Let cool down.

7. Refrigerate until well jelled.

Option: We also have a recipe for Low-Sweetener Fruit Juice Jello.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Low-Sweetener Fruit Juice Jello

Low-Sweetener Jello is made with unsweetened fruit juice and Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Low-Sweetener Jello Ingredients

4 cups unsweetened fruit juice 
4 teaspoons calcium water
¼ cup lemon juice if required (See Note in Step 2 below.)
½ cup up to 1 cup honey or 3/4 cup up to 2 cups sugar (Other dry or liquid sweeteners that measure like sugar or honey can be used in place of sugar or honey.)

Low-Sweetener Jello Directions

1. Measure juice into sauce pan.

2. Add calcium water and lemon juice (if using) and mix well.
Note: Apple juice & white grape juice require lemon juice.

3. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

4. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the mixture comes back up to a boil. Once the mixture returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

5. Pour hot jello into serving bowl or individual dishes. Let cool down.

6. Refrigerate until well jelled.

Option: We also have a recipe for Unsweetened Fruit Juice Jello.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Jelled Milk Dessert

Jelled Milk is a low-sweetener dessert made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 2 cups

Jelled Milk Ingredients

2 cups flavored milk (any kind of milk can be used)
2 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder
2 teaspoons calcium water (Only add the calcium water if you are using milk that does not contain calcium naturally or is not calcium fortified.)

Jelled Milk Directions

1. Put 2 cups of milk into sauce pan (Add 2 teaspoons calcium water, if needed, and stir well.). Heat milk to nearly boiling.

2. Put hot milk into cup for immersion blender, or in food processor, or in blender. Add pectin. It is very important to vent the lid (if there is one) to let steam out. Don’t use an enclosed blender that can’t be vented. Blend for 10 seconds, then stop and scrape down the sides so all pectin clumps are in or on the milk. Blend for a full minute until all powder is totally dissolved.

3. Pour hot milk into a serving bowl or individual dishes.

4. Let cool then refrigerate until firm.

To make calcium water: combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Option: If you want to double the recipe, bring 4 cups of milk to nearly boiling. Turn off heat. Put 1 cup of the hot milk in a cup for immersion blender, or in food processor, or in blender. Add 4 teaspoons of Pomona’s Pectin and follow instructions above for dissolving the pectin in the milk. Return milk in pan to nearly boiling. Turn off heat, add pectinized milk, and stir well. Steps 3 and 4 remain the same.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Frozen Lemon or Lime Pie

Frozen Lemon or Lime Pie is a low-honey jelled pie made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: one 9-inch pie

Frozen Lemon or Lime Pie Ingredients

¾ cup fresh lemon or lime juice
¾ cup honey, divided
1½ teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder
1½ cups plain yogurt, warmed to 90 -100 degrees F.
1 cup whipping cream
¾ teaspoon vanilla
9” crumb crust or pre-baked pie dough crust

Frozen Lemon or Lime Pie Directions

1. Squeeze fresh juice, measure, and put into sauce pan.

2. Measure ¾ cup of honey into a measuring cup. Remove 3 Tablespoons of the measured honey into a small bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into the 3 Tablespoons of honey. Set honey and honey-pectin mixture aside.

3. Measure yogurt into a medium bowl and warm to 90 – 100 degrees F.

4. Bring juice in sauce pan to a boil. Add pectin-honey mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 minute to dissolve the pectin while the mixture comes back up to a boil.

5. Stir in remaining honey and remove from heat. Add juice mixture to warmed yogurt and stir well.

6. Cover and refrigerate in shallow pan until semi-firm (about ½ hour).

7. While juice mixture is chilling, whip the cream and vanilla together to stiff peaks. When juice mixture is semi-firm, gently fold in whipped cream.

8. Pour into crumb crust or pre-baked pie dough crust. Cover and freeze until firm or frozen.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Fruit Syrup — Low Sweetener

Fruit Syrup is a low-sugar or low-honey syrup made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Fruit Syrup Ingredients

If you are making fruit syrup from mashed fruit, find the jam recipe for that fruit in the Cooked Jam, Jelly — Low Sugar or Honey section of the recipe sheet that comes with Pomona’s Pectin.

If you are making fruit syrup from juice, find the jelly recipe for that fruit in the Cooked Jam, Jelly — Low Sugar or Honey section of the recipe sheet that comes with Pomona’s Pectin.

Use ¼ the amount of pectin in the recipe. All of the other ingredients in the recipe stay the same.

Fruit Syrup Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Prepare fruit or juice.

3. Measure mashed fruit or juice into sauce pan.

4. Add calcium water and lemon or lime juice (if called for in the recipe) and mix well.

5. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix correct amount of pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

6. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the mixture comes back up to a boil. Once the mixture returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

7. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Strawberry Jam Sweetened with Juice Concentrate

Photo by Kyle McDonald https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Photo by Kyle McDonald https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Strawberry Jam Sweetened with Juice Concentrate is a cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Strawberry Jam with Juice Concentrate Ingredients

3 cups mashed strawberries
2 teaspoons calcium water
1 cup juice concentrate (white grape or apple, no sugar added – can be found in the freezer section of a grocery store)
2 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Strawberry Jam with Juice Concentrate Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Wash, hull, and mash strawberries. Measure mashed strawberries into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and mix well.

4. Bring juice concentrate to a boil in a separate sauce pan. Put boiling concentrate in cup for immersion blender, or in food processor, or in blender. Add pectin. It is very important to vent the lid (if there is one) to let steam out. Don’t use an enclosed blender that can’t be vented. Blend for 10 seconds, then stop and scrape down the sides so all pectin clumps are in or on the liquid. Then blend for a full minute until all powder is totally dissolved.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-concentrate. Stir for 1 minute while mixture returns to a full boil. Remove from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Strawberry Jam — Unsweetened, Stevia Concentrate or Very Lightly Sweetened

Photo by Kyle McDonald https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Photo by Kyle McDonald https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

This Strawberry Jam is a cooked jam that is made with no sweetener at all, stevia concentrate, or other very concentrated sweetener, or a very small amount of sugar or honey or other sweeteners that measure like sugar or honey and Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Unsweetened Strawberry Jam Ingredients

4 cups mashed strawberries
2 teaspoons calcium water
¾ cup water or unsweetened juice
2 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Unsweetened Strawberry Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Wash, hull, and mash strawberries. Measure mashed strawberries into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and mix well.

4. Bring water or unsweetened juice to a boil in a separate sauce pan. Put boiling water or unsweetened juice in cup for immersion blender, or in food processor, or in blender. Add pectin. It is very important to vent the lid (if there is one) to let steam out. Don’t use an enclosed blender that can’t be vented. Blend for 10 seconds, then stop and scrape down the sides so all pectin clumps are in or on the liquid. Then blend for a full minute until all powder is totally dissolved.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-water or pectin-juice. Stir for 1 minute while mixture returns to a full boil. Remove from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Option: To sweeten with Stevia concentrate or a small amount of any other sweetener, add sweetener to taste in Step 5 before removing from the heat. Cook and stir for 1 additional minute after adding sweetener. Jam made with no sweetener may be kind of tart and rather bland. Sweetener, whichever one you like, helps to bring out the flavor of the fruit.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Concord Grape Jam

Concord Grape Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Concord Grape Jam Ingredients

3 lbs Concord grapes (to make 4 cups prepared grapes)
2 teaspoons calcium water
½ cup up to 1 cup honey or ¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
2 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Concord Grape Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Pop the skins off the grapes and set the skins aside. To separate the pulp and juice from the seeds, either put the skinless grapes through a Foley Mill or cook the skinless grapes with a little water, mash them up, and put through a Foley Mill or strainer. Collect all the juice and pulp and discard the seeds.

3. Puree the skins in a food processor or blender. Add the pureed skins to the juice and pulp and mix together well.

4. Measure 4 cups prepared grapes into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and mix well.

4. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

Print

Guava Jelly

Guava fruitGuava Jelly is a low-sugar cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Guava Jelly Ingredients

3 lbs fully ripe guava (to make 4 cups guava juice)
3 cups water
4 teaspoons calcium water
¼ cup lemon juice (if guava is sweet)
¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
4 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Guava Jelly Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Cut thin slices of unpeeled guava and put in sauce pan. Add water. Bring to a boil, turn down heat, and simmer covered for 5 minutes. Mash guava. Pour mashed fruit into a jelly bag and let drip into bowl until dripping stops. Gently squeeze jelly bag for last bit of juice.

3. Measure 4 cups juice into sauce pan.

4. Add calcium water and lemon juice (if needed), and mix well.

5. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

6. Bring juice mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jelly comes back up to a boil. Once the jelly returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

7. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

The guava photo is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

Print

Guava Jam

Guava fruitGuava Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Guava Jam Ingredients

4 cups strained or mashed or pureed guava
4 teaspoons calcium water
¼ cup lemon or lime juice (if guava is sweet)
½ cup up to 1 cup honey or ¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Guava Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Option A: Peel guavas and cut in pieces or cut unpeeled guavas in half and scoop out pulp. Place pulp or pieces in sauce pan with a little water. Bring to a boil then turn down heat. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until fruit is soft. Strain softened pulp through a food mill or sieve to remove seeds. Seeds are very hard and must be removed.

2. Option B: Cut guavas in half and scoop out the center area containing the seeds. Seeds are very hard and must be removed. Then scoop out the rest of the guava pulp and mash if soft or puree with blender or food processor if firm.

3. Measure guava pulp into sauce pan.

4. Add calcium water and lemon juice or lime juice (if needed), and mix well.

5. Measure sweetener into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

6. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

7. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

The guava photo is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

Print

I am a fan for life!!!

I ordered Pomona’s Pectin online a few months ago after someone posted on another canning site that this is the only way they will make their jams and jellies because it had very little sugar. I ended up giving all my jams and jellies away because it was way too sweet for me, so yesterday I tried the pectin for the first time and made a blackberry blueberry jam and blueberry lemon jam . . . Omg I am sold for life!!

Now I wonder why I waited so long to try it. My jams now taste like fruit and not sugar . . . happy happy girl! Can’t wait for summer to try some more different flavors, and now I definitely have to order your book. Thank you for this wonderful product.

And did I mention how many attempts at jam failed? And people would say just use it as syrup. Well I didn’t want syrup; I wanted jam. I now know that I will no longer have that problem.

Sue Duncan
Orangevale, CA
February 28, 2014

Winter Jam Greetings: Cold Comfort Jelly, Rose Hip Jam, and Jam Cake for Valentine’s Day

 

February 2014 – #8

Greetings from the Frozen North–

Let’s Make Jam!

Photo from UnofficialNetworks.com
We at Pomona’s hope that you are surviving this historic winter. For a little diversion from shoveling snow, we bring you some great jam recipes.

Allison Carroll Duffy, from Maine, brings us Cold Comfort Jelly; and Becky Hoff, from Minnesota, shares recipes for Rose Hip Jam and Jam Cake — perfect for Valentine’s Day.

 

CanningCraft Creates: Cold Comfort Jelly

by Allison Carroll Duffy

When I was a kid, whenever my siblings or I were in bed with a cough, sore throat, or otherwise nasty cold, my stepmom would make us a big mug of honey-lemon-ginger “tea.” Nothing more than boiling water and lemon juice infused with ginger root and sweetened with a bit of honey, it was a simple concoction, but it provided welcome comfort – at least a little bit — when we were sick.

When I met my husband, I learned that he had long relied on a similar anti-cold brew that also included garlic and cayenne pepper . . . Because we drink this tea a lot, I thought it would be handy to adapt it into a jelly — a tea “concentrate” of sorts. . . .

Read More and Get the Cold Comfort Jelly Recipe Here.

 

Harmony Garden Club: Learn, Jam, Eat

by Becky Hoff

The first snowfall in Harmony coincided with the November meeting of the Club this year. Harmony, a small town in SE Minnesota, population 1,020, is known as “The Biggest Little Town in Southern Minnesota.” In warm months, tourists bike on the Harmony-Preston Valley State Bike Trail, take tours of Niagara Cave, and learn about the Harmony-Canton Amish, an old order Amish community living in the country near Harmony. (Check out www.exploreharmony.com if you are curious about our town!)                                                     Becky at the Garden Club

We meet once a month to discuss all things garden related: vegetable gardening, fruit trees, landscaping, straw bale gardening, cooking with fresh herbs, garden art — you name it, we’ve talked about it. The club serves as a study group for those who want to learn about and promote amateur gardening. As a member for the last three years, I can testify that I have learned a lot from the wealth of knowledge and talent in this group! So I was quite flattered when asked to lead a discussion on home canning.

All levels of canning expertise were represented in the room. Some have been canning for years, others used to but don’t anymore, and still others have never tried. Regardless of experience level, I tell everyone the same thing when I talk about canning: Read your instructions and do as they say!

This may seem simple but so many mistakes can be prevented if you read through your recipes and instructions before even turning on the stove. It is equally important to have your tools and ingredients laid out and ready so you are not scrambling around when it’s time to fill the jars.

I love to talk about low-sugar canning. People want homemade preserves like their mom or grandma used to make, but they don’t want the 5 or more cups of sugar that go into a typical batch of jam. Traditional recipes were developed at a time when sugar was needed to help preserve the food, but also more calories were burned through the course of a day. We just don’t need that kind of caloric intake these days! Fortunately we can get away with using a lot less sugar thanks to new products and modern canning processes.
Becky’s Canning Shelves

If you don’t want to go overboard on the sugar, I recommend Pomona’s Universal Pectin.  Over the past few years I have switched exclusively to Pomona’s for all of my jam making. The jams turn out great, and no one even notices that the sugar is cut at least in half. The end products in no way remind you of “diet jam,” they are just plain good preserves.

In Garden Club we traditionally end the evening with coffee and dessert, and so I made a Rombauer Jam Cake from the classic cookbook, Joy of Cooking. I made it with Blueberry Jam instead of the usual Raspberry or Blackberry — Blue Spice Cake never tasted so good! I also made a batch of Any Kind of Jam & Oatmeal Bars with a combination of Rose Hip and RhubyRazz jams.


Becky’s Blueberry and RhubyRazz Jams

I love sharing information, ideas, and good food with friends. And I’m very happy to share my recipes for Rose Hip Jam, Blue Spice Rombauer Jam Cake, and Any Kind of Jam & Oatmeal Bars with all Pomona’s Jam Notes readers. Hope you have as much fun learning, jamming, and eating as we do at the Harmony Garden Club.

Pomona’s News

We are working on a new page for our website: My Jam Didn’t Jell — How Can I Fix It? If you’d like to volunteer to read our draft and give us feedback, email info@pomonapectin.com.


Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin makes a wonderful gift for yourself, a friend, or family member, any time of the year. If you like Pomona’s, you’ll LOVE our book.
Available everywhere books are sold.

New recipes have been added to our website recently. Here are a few:

Lilikoi Jelly
Red Wine Jelly
White Wine Jelly
Lemon Jelly
Orange Jam
Ground Cherry Jam
Apple Pie Jam

We hope you enjoyed this issue of Jam Notes. We are always interested in any comments, questions, or ideas you’d like to share with us: info@pomonapectin.com.

 

  ~~~~~

Copyright © , All rights reserved.
Jam Notes is published 3 times each year: February, June, and September. We send “Updates” when we have a new blog post from Allison Carroll Duffy.Our mailing address is:                                           

CanningCraft Creates: Cold Comfort Jelly

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

If you want to be notified when Allison Carroll Duffy’s guest blog posts arrive, subscribe to Jam Notes  in the sidebar to the right of this page. Subscribers get “updates” via email.

Here’s Allison:

When I was a kid, whenever my siblings or I were in bed with a cough, sore throat, or otherwise nasty cold, my stepmom would make us a big mug of honey-lemon-ginger “tea.” Nothing more than boiling water and lemon juice infused with ginger root and sweetened with a bit of honey, it was a simple concoction, but it provided welcome comfort – at least a little bit — when we were sick.

When I met my husband, I learned that he had long relied on a similar anti-cold brew that also included garlic and cayenne pepper. Sipping a hot liquid of most any kind feels good when you have a cold, but beyond this, most of these ingredients have anti-bacterial properties, which certainly doesn’t hurt when it comes to fighting a cold.

Even when I’m not sick I enjoy this “tea,” and these days my favorite version of it includes a lot of lemon and ginger, along with honey and a bit of cayenne pepper. It’s a favorite around our house, especially this winter when it’s been so cold here in Maine. Sipping a hot mug by the wood stove is a delightful way to warm up.

DSCN3445Because we drink this tea so much, I thought it would be handy to adapt it into a jelly — a tea “concentrate” of sorts. This way, we simply scoop a couple of spoonfuls of the jelly into a mug, add boiling water, mix well, and enjoy a quick and easy mug of tea!

The jelly by itself is pretty intense (very lemony and with a bit of heat), though I do, on occasion, eat it plain or on toast. For tea, I find that 2 tablespoons of jelly per cup of boiling water works well, though you might want more or less jelly depending on your taste.

Cold Comfort Jelly

Cold Comfort Jelly is a low-honey cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Cold Comfort Jelly Ingredients

DSCN3429¼ pound fresh ginger root
2½ cups water
10-15 lemons (enough to yield 2 cups of freshly squeezed lemon juice)
¼ teaspoon cayenne powder
4 teaspoons calcium water
1½ cups honey, divided
4 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Cold Comfort Jelly Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

DSCN34402. Slice the ginger root into thin pieces–1/4 inch thick or less. Place the sliced ginger into a sauce pan, add the 2 1/2 cups water, cover with a lid, and bring the mixture to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat slightly and continue to cook, still covered, for 15 minutes. Then, remove from the heat.

3. Pour the mixture through a strainer into a large, heat-proof measuring cup or bowl. Discard the ginger pieces (or use them for something else). Measure out 2 cups of the ginger-infused liquid. If you have more liquid than you need, remove as much liquid as necessary to meet the 2 cup measurement. If you don’t have enough of the ginger-infused liquid, simply add more water to meet the 2 cup measurement.

4. Juice the lemons. Pour the freshly-squeezed lemon juice through a fine mesh strainer. If necessary, use your fingers to press the pulp against the strainer, extracting as much juice as possible. Discard any seeds or pulp remaining in the strainer. Measure out 2 cups of the lemon juice. (If you have extra, you can use it for something else.)

DSCN3423

5. Combine the 2 cups of the ginger- infused liquid and the 2 cups of lemon juice in a sauce pan. Add the cayenne powder and calcium water, then stir to combine.

6. In a separate bowl, combine 3/4 cup of the honey and the pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

7. Bring the ginger-lemon liquid to rolling boil over high heat. Add the honey-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Add the remaining 3/4 cup honey, and stir to dissolve the honey while returning the mixture to a boil. Then, remove it from the heat.

8. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jelly, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

9. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

10. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then, remove jars from canner.

11. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then, confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and Photos by Allison Carroll Duffy.

Printable Copy of the Cold Comfort Jelly recipe only.

To learn more about Allison, visit her CanningCraft blog.

Cold Comfort Jelly

DSCN3445Cold Comfort Jelly is a low-honey cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy. This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Cold Comfort Jelly Ingredients

DSCN3429¼ pound fresh ginger root
2½ cups water
10-15 lemons (enough to yield 2 cups of freshly squeezed lemon juice)
¼ teaspoon cayenne powder
4 teaspoons calcium water
1½ cups honey, divided
4 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Cold Comfort Jelly Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

DSCN34402. Slice the ginger root into thin pieces–1/4 inch thick or less. Place the sliced ginger into a sauce pan, add the 2 1/2 cups water, cover with a lid, and bring the mixture to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat slightly and continue to cook, still covered, for 15 minutes. Then, remove from the heat.

3. Pour the mixture through a strainer into a large, heat-proof measuring cup or bowl. Discard the ginger pieces (or use them for something else). Measure out 2 cups of the ginger-infused liquid. If you have more liquid than you need, remove as much liquid as necessary to meet the 2 cup measurement. If you don’t have enough of the ginger-infused liquid, simply add more water to meet the 2 cup measurement.

4. Juice the lemons. Pour the freshly-squeezed lemon juice through a fine mesh strainer. If necessary, use your fingers to press the pulp against the strainer, extracting as much juice as possible. Discard any seeds or pulp remaining in the strainer. Measure out 2 cups of the lemon juice. (If you have extra, you can use it for something else.)

DSCN3423

5. Combine the 2 cups of the ginger- infused liquid and the 2 cups of lemon juice in a sauce pan. Add the cayenne powder and calcium water, then stir to combine.

6. In a separate bowl, combine 3/4 cup of the honey and the pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

7. Bring the ginger-lemon liquid to rolling boil over high heat. Add the honey-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Add the remaining 3/4 cup honey, and stir to dissolve the honey while returning the mixture to a boil. Then, remove it from the heat.

8. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jelly, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

9. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

10. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then, remove jars from canner.

11. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then, confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and Photos by Allison Carroll Duffy.

Read Allison’s full blog post for Cold Comfort Jelly.

To learn more about Allison, visit her CanningCraft blog.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

Print

Rose Hip Jam

Photo by: http://www.bealtainecottage.com

Rugosa Rose Hips — Photo by http://www.bealtainecottage.com

Rugosa Rose

Rugosa Rose — Photo by Katie Meyers

Created and contributed by Becky Hoff, Rose Hip Jam is a low-sugar cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Becky says, “Rose hips are the fruit of the rose bush. In my yard I am lucky enough to have a hedge of Rugosa roses, which in my opinion produce the best hips for jam making. They are tart and delicious, like a cross between an apple and a berry – but they are not very big. They are harvested in the late summer or fall when they are a bright reddish orange.”

Yield: 3 to 4 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

How to Make Rose Hip Puree

There are two schools of thought on how to make Rose Hip Jam. Some say you should slice open every single hip, use a teaspoon to scrape out the seeds, discard the seeds, and only use what is left to make your jam. I tried this once, and gave up on it about 1½ hours into the project. It was tedious and time consuming, and I didn’t get very far. I cut the remaining hips in half and proceeded as below.

My (lazy) method involves cutting the rose hips in half, simmering them for about 20 minutes in enough water to keep them from sticking, mashing well, and pressing the pulp through a strainer. The resulting puree is then used to make the jam. It took about two and a half quarts of whole rose hips to make three cups of puree.

Rose Hip Jam Ingredients

3 cups of strained rose hip puree
3 teaspoons calcium water
3 Tablespoons lemon juice
1½ cups sugar
1½ teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder
(For a firmer jell, use up to 2¼ teaspoons pectin.)

Rose Hip Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure fruit into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and lemon juice, and mix well.

4. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

This jam has an easily spreadable consistency due to the amount of pectin used and pureeing the rose hips. It is sweet-tart and good, and when you’re slathering this jam on your breakfast toast in the winter, it brightens up your morning considerably. Of course you could go through the trouble and effort of slicing and deseeding all of your rose hips before cooking them down if you wanted a chunkier jam. This might be a reasonable job for a group of people – grab some friends, a bottle or two of wine, and get to work!

Rose Hip Jam on Toast

Rose Hip Jam on Toast
Photo by Becky Hoff

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

Print

Blue Spice Rombauer Jam Cake

This recipe is adapted by Becky Hoff from the 1975 edition of Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer and Marion Rombauer Becker.

Blue Spice Rombauer Jam Cake Ingredients

1½ cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon double-acting baking powder
½ teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon cloves
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon nutmeg
6 Tablespoons butter or shortening
1 cup packed brown sugar
2 eggs
3 tablespoons cultured sour cream *
1 cup rather firm blueberry jam (the original recipe calls for raspberry or blackberry)
½ cup broken nut meats (optional)

Blue Spice Rombauer Jam Cake Directions

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

2. Have all ingredients at about 70 degrees F. (To do this, take refrigerated items out and set them on the counter for a few hours prior to mixing.)

3. Sift, then measure the flour.

4. Resift the flour with the baking powder, baking soda, cloves, cinnamon, and nutmeg.

5. Cream the butter or shortening with the sugar until light.

6. Beat the eggs into the creamed butter and sugar, one at a time.

7. Beat in the sour cream.

8. Stir the flour mixture into the butter mixture until barely blended.

9. Stir in the jam.

10. Stir in the nuts, if using.

11. Pour the batter into a greased tube pan. Bake about ½ hour or until done. Test by sticking a toothpick into the center of your cake. If the cake is done, then the toothpick may come out a bit sticky, but not wet with batter.

* A note on cultured sour cream: Cultured sour cream is a product that is soured by fermentation, in the same manner that yogurt is prepared. Many commercial varieties of sour cream are soured by adding an acidic ingredient instead of by means of fermentation. You could certainly use any type of sour cream for this recipe, but if you would like to stick to the original directions, look for sour cream that contains “live active cultures.” You may also substitute plain yogurt that contains live active cultures. And although I have not tried this, I suspect that buttermilk would make an acceptable substitute as well.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Lilikoi Jelly

Lilikoi Jelly is a low-sugar cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Lilikoi Jelly Ingredients

4 ½ to 5 lbs fresh lilikoi to make 2 cups juice
Or 2 cups frozen, unsweetened passion fruit pulp (e.g. Goya brand), defrosted.

To prepare fresh lilikoi: cut fruit in half. Use a spoon to remove the pulp and seeds from the rind. Put the seedy pulp in a Food Mill and turn the crank until you have produced 2 cups of seedless juice.

Make Lilikoi Jelly with:
2 cups lilikoi juice
2 cups water
2 teaspoons calcium water
2 cups sugar
3 to 4 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Lilikoi Jelly Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure fruit juice and water into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and mix well.

4. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

This recipe was adapted from a recipe on the My Lilikoi Kitchen blog in order to create a low-sugar Lilikoi Jelly recipe.

http://www.mylilikoikitchen.com/2013/01/26/lilikoi-jelly-passion-fruit/

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Red Wine Jelly

Red Wine Jelly is a low-sugar cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: about 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Red Wine Jelly Ingredients

4 cups of any red wine you like
2 teaspoons calcium water
1/4 cup lemon juice
3/4 cup up to 2 cups sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Red Wine Jelly Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure wine into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and lemon juice and mix well.

4. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

5. Bring wine mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat. Remove cinnamon stick (if using).

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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White Wine Jelly

White Wine Jelly is a low-sugar cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 2 to 3 cups

Before You Begin: Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

White Wine Jelly Ingredients

1½ cups Chardonnay or White Zinfandel (or any blush or white wine)
½ cup orange juice
1 teaspoon calcium water
2 Tablespoons lemon juice
½ teaspoon grated orange peel (optional)
½ cup up to 1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon Pomona’s Pectin powder

White Wine Jelly Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure wine and orange juice into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water, lemon juice, and grated orange peel (if using), and mix well.

4. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

5. Bring wine mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1  minute to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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