CanningCraft Creates: Kumquat Marmalade

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Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

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Here’s Allison:

Every so often, a package of fresh fruit will arrive on my parents’ doorstep – an unexpected gift from their friend Garo who lives in California. He’s sent them fresh figs from his backyard tree several times, and a month or so ago they received a box full of gorgeous orange kumquats. They love getting the fruit but, not being jam makers, they sometimes find themselves with more than they can use.

Fortunately, I often end up with their extras! When my mom came to visit a few weeks back, she stashed a good-sized bag of the kumquats in my refrigerator, and mentioned off-handedly that maybe I could make marmalade. Later, my husband pulled out the bag and sliced up a couple of the fruits for all of us to sample. What a welcome treat they were!

DSCN3812

In the midst of a very snowy Maine winter (yes, we still had a lot of snow and freezing temperatures throughout March!) the small golden-orange oval-shaped fruits were truly lovely to behold. What’s more, never having tried kumquats before, I was very surprised to discover that the peel is slightly sweet, and not at all bitter, while the flesh is a little sour – quite unlike other types of citrus. As soon as I tasted one, I realized that marmalade was exactly what I wanted to make with them.

I’m a big fan of marmalade, but there’s no question it can be a little bitter – especially if the recipe includes a lot of peel. Kumquat marmalade typically uses the whole fruit, including all the peel, and yet I find it to be much less bitter than other marmalades, due to the sweetness of the peel. What’s more, kumquat peels are quite thin, so they get very soft and break down a lot during the cooking process, making the texture a bit more like jam than most marmalades are.

So, if you are not normally a fan of marmalade but are craving a bit of citrus, this is the marmalade to try! I used Nagami kumquats for this recipe, one of the more popular and widely available varieties, but other types will work as well. If your local grocery store does not carry them, specialty food stores and Asian markets often have a good selection during the winter and spring months.

Kumquat Marmalade

DSCN3858Kumquat Marmalade is a low-sugar cooked marmalade made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Kumquat Marmalade Ingredients

2 pounds kumquats
2 cups water
¼ cup lemon juice
2 teaspoons calcium water
1½ cups sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Kumquat Marmalade Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Thoroughly rinse the kumquats. Then, slice each kumquat width-wise into several thin, quarter-sized rounds (a small, serrated knife works well for this). Remove and discard the seeds as you are working.

DSCN3829

3. Combine the sliced kumquats and the 2 cups of water in a saucepan, cover with a lid, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes, then remove from the heat.

4. Measure 4 cups of the cooked kumquat mixture. If you have extra, save it for another use. Pour the measured amount of the kumquat mixture into a sauce pan. Add lemon juice and calcium water and stir to combine.

5. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and the pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

DSCN38366. Bring the kumquat mixture to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return the mixture to a boil, then remove it from the heat.

7. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with marmalade, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

8. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

9. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

10. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Pomona’s Pectin Jam Notes Update: Kumquat Marmalade

 

April 2014 – Jam Notes Update

Kumquat Marmalade — Winter Calls to Spring

By Allison Carroll Duffy, author of Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin

Every so often, a package of fresh fruit will arrive on my parents’ doorstep – an unexpected gift from their friend Garo who lives in California. He’s sent them fresh figs from his backyard tree several times, and a month or so ago they received a box full of gorgeous orange kumquats. They love getting the fruit but, not being jam makers, they sometimes find themselves with more than they can use.
Fortunately, I often end up with their extras! When my mom came to visit a few weeks back, she stashed a good-sized bag of the kumquats in my refrigerator, and mentioned off-handedly that maybe I could make marmalade. Later, my husband pulled out the bag and sliced up a couple of the fruits for all of us to sample. What a welcome treat they were!
In the midst of a very snowy Maine winter (yes, we still had a lot of snow and freezing temperatures throughout March!) the small golden-orange oval-shaped fruits were truly lovely to behold. What’s more, never having tried kumquats before, I was very surprised to discover that the peel is slightly sweet, and not at all bitter, while the flesh is a little sour – quite unlike other types of citrus. As soon as I tasted one, I realized that marmalade was exactly what I wanted to make with them.
I’m a big fan of marmalade, but there’s no question it can be a little bitter – especially if the recipe includes a lot of peel. Kumquat marmalade typically uses the whole fruit, including all the peel, and yet I find it to be much less bitter than other marmalades, due to the sweetness of the peel. What’s more, kumquat peels are quite thin, so they get very soft and break down a lot during the cooking process, making the texture a bit more like jam than most marmalades are. 

So, if you are not normally a fan of marmalade but are craving a bit of citrus, this is the marmalade to try! I used Nagami kumquats for this recipe, one of the more popular and widely available varieties, but other types will work as well. If your local grocery store does not carry them, specialty food stores and Asian markets often have a good selection during the winter and spring months.

Kumquat Marmalade Ingredients

2 pounds kumquats
2 cups water
¼ cup lemon juice
2 teaspoons calcium water
1½ cups sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Full blog post & recipe here.

Additional new recipes on our website:
Strawberry Jam Sweetened with Juice Concentrate
Strawberry Jam — Unsweetened, Sweetened with Stevia Concentrate, or Very Lightly Sweetened
Guava Jam
Guava Jelly
Frozen Lemon or Lime Pie 

Have you or a friend had a problem with jell fail?
Take a look at our new website page: My Jam or Jelly Didn’t Jell — Can I Fix It?
First figure out why it didn’t jell; then learn, step-by-step, how to fix it.

Did you miss the February issue of Jam Notes with Allison’s Cold Comfort Jelly recipe and Becky Hoff’s recipes for Rose Hip Jam and Blue Spice Rombauer Jam Cake? It’s not too late!

Spring is on its way, finally — thank you for subscribing to Jam Notes and, of course, Happy Jamming from the Pomona’s Partners — Connie, Paul & Mary Lou.

Write to us at info@pomonapectin.com

Copyright © , All rights reserved.

Kumquat Marmalade

DSCN3858Kumquat Marmalade is a low-sugar cooked marmalade made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy. This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin.

She says:

If you are not normally a fan of marmalade but are craving a bit of citrus, this is the marmalade to try!

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Kumquat Marmalade Ingredients

DSCN38122 pounds kumquats
2 cups water
¼ cup lemon juice
2 teaspoons calcium water
1½ cups sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Kumquat Marmalade Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Thoroughly rinse the kumquats. Then, slice each kumquat width-wise into several thin, quarter-sized rounds (a small, serrated knife works well for this). Remove and discard the seeds as you are working.

DSCN3829

3. Combine the sliced kumquats and the 2 cups of water in a saucepan, cover with a lid, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes, then remove from the heat.

DSCN38364. Measure 4 cups of the cooked kumquat mixture. If you have extra, save it for another use. Pour the measured amount of the kumquat mixture into a sauce pan. Add lemon juice and calcium water and stir to combine.

 

 

5. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and the pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

6. Bring the kumquat mixture to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return the mixture to a boil, then remove it from the heat.

7. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with marmalade, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

8. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

9. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

10. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Tomato-Shrimp Aspic

Tomato-Shrimp Aspic is jelled with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives. See below for where to buy.

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Tomato-Shrimp Aspic Ingredients

1/3 cup diced scallions
1/3 cup diced celery
1/3 cup diced green pepper
4¼ oz. drained, cooked shrimp
1 bay leaf
paprika, garlic, red or black pepper, celery salt, tarragon, all to taste
1 Tablespoon butter
3 cups tomato juice
3 teaspoons calcium-water
3 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Tomato-Shrimp Aspic Directions

1. Saute vegetables, shrimp, and herbs in butter; remove bay leaf; arrange in a mold.

2. Measure tomato juice into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and stir well.

4. Bring tomato juice to a full boil. Turn off heat.

5. Put 1 cup boiling tomato juice in cup for immersion blender, or in food processor, or in blender. Add pectin. It is very important to vent the lid (if there is one) to let steam out. Don’t use an enclosed blender that can’t be vented. Blend for 10 seconds, then stop and scrape down the sides so all pectin clumps are in or on the liquid. Blend for a full minute until all powder is totally dissolved.

6. Return tomato juice in pan to a boil. Add the pectinized tomato juice and stir to distribute the pectin throughout all the juice.

7. Pour hot juice over vegetables and shrimp in mold. Let cool then refrigerate until set. Unmold onto bed of lettuce.

Options:
For a vegetarian or vegan aspic, omit the shrimp.
It is fine to vary the seasoning according to your own taste.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

Print

Unsweetened Fruit Juice Jello

Unsweetened Jello is made with unsweetened fruit juice and Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener or no sweetener at all. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 cups

Before You Begin: Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Unsweetened Jello Ingredients

4 cups unsweetened fruit juice
4 teaspoons calcium water
¼ cup lemon juice if required (See Note in Step 2 below.)
4 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Unsweetened Jello Directions

1. Measure juice into sauce pan.

2. Add calcium water and lemon juice (if using) and mix well.
Note: Apple juice & white grape juice require lemon juice.

3. Bring juice to a boil. Turn off heat.

4. Put 1 cup boiling juice in cup for immersion blender, or in food processor, or in blender. Add pectin. It is very important to vent the lid (if there is one) to let steam out. Don’t use an enclosed blender that can’t be vented. Blend for 10 seconds, then stop and scrape down the sides so all pectin clumps are in or on the liquid. Then blend for a full minute until all powder is totally dissolved.

5. Turn heat on and bring juice in pan back to a boil. Add pectin-juice to pan of hot juice. Stir well while mixture returns to full boil. Remove from heat.

6. Pour hot jello into serving bowl or individual dishes. Let cool down.

7. Refrigerate until well jelled.

Option: We also have a recipe for Low-Sweetener Fruit Juice Jello.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

Print

Low-Sweetener Fruit Juice Jello

Low-Sweetener Jello is made with unsweetened fruit juice and Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Low-Sweetener Jello Ingredients

4 cups unsweetened fruit juice 
4 teaspoons calcium water
¼ cup lemon juice if required (See Note in Step 2 below.)
½ cup up to 1 cup honey or 3/4 cup up to 2 cups sugar (Other dry or liquid sweeteners that measure like sugar or honey can be used in place of sugar or honey.)

Low-Sweetener Jello Directions

1. Measure juice into sauce pan.

2. Add calcium water and lemon juice (if using) and mix well.
Note: Apple juice & white grape juice require lemon juice.

3. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

4. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the mixture comes back up to a boil. Once the mixture returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

5. Pour hot jello into serving bowl or individual dishes. Let cool down.

6. Refrigerate until well jelled.

Option: We also have a recipe for Unsweetened Fruit Juice Jello.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Jelled Milk Dessert

Jelled Milk is a low-sweetener dessert made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 2 cups

Jelled Milk Ingredients

2 cups flavored milk (any kind of milk can be used)
2 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder
2 teaspoons calcium water (Only add the calcium water if you are using milk that does not contain calcium naturally or is not calcium fortified.)

Jelled Milk Directions

1. Put 2 cups of milk into sauce pan (Add 2 teaspoons calcium water, if needed, and stir well.). Heat milk to nearly boiling.

2. Put hot milk into cup for immersion blender, or in food processor, or in blender. Add pectin. It is very important to vent the lid (if there is one) to let steam out. Don’t use an enclosed blender that can’t be vented. Blend for 10 seconds, then stop and scrape down the sides so all pectin clumps are in or on the milk. Blend for a full minute until all powder is totally dissolved.

3. Pour hot milk into a serving bowl or individual dishes.

4. Let cool then refrigerate until firm.

To make calcium water: combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Option: If you want to double the recipe, bring 4 cups of milk to nearly boiling. Turn off heat. Put 1 cup of the hot milk in a cup for immersion blender, or in food processor, or in blender. Add 4 teaspoons of Pomona’s Pectin and follow instructions above for dissolving the pectin in the milk. Return milk in pan to nearly boiling. Turn off heat, add pectinized milk, and stir well. Steps 3 and 4 remain the same.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

Print

Frozen Lemon or Lime Pie

Frozen Lemon or Lime Pie is a low-honey jelled pie made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: one 9-inch pie

Frozen Lemon or Lime Pie Ingredients

¾ cup fresh lemon or lime juice
¾ cup honey, divided
1½ teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder
1½ cups plain yogurt, warmed to 90 -100 degrees F.
1 cup whipping cream
¾ teaspoon vanilla
9” crumb crust or pre-baked pie dough crust

Frozen Lemon or Lime Pie Directions

1. Squeeze fresh juice, measure, and put into sauce pan.

2. Measure ¾ cup of honey into a measuring cup. Remove 3 Tablespoons of the measured honey into a small bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into the 3 Tablespoons of honey. Set honey and honey-pectin mixture aside.

3. Measure yogurt into a medium bowl and warm to 90 – 100 degrees F.

4. Bring juice in sauce pan to a boil. Add pectin-honey mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 minute to dissolve the pectin while the mixture comes back up to a boil.

5. Stir in remaining honey and remove from heat. Add juice mixture to warmed yogurt and stir well.

6. Cover and refrigerate in shallow pan until semi-firm (about ½ hour).

7. While juice mixture is chilling, whip the cream and vanilla together to stiff peaks. When juice mixture is semi-firm, gently fold in whipped cream.

8. Pour into crumb crust or pre-baked pie dough crust. Cover and freeze until firm or frozen.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

Print

Fruit Syrup — Low Sweetener

Fruit Syrup is a low-sugar or low-honey syrup made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Fruit Syrup Ingredients

If you are making fruit syrup from mashed fruit, find the jam recipe for that fruit in the Cooked Jam, Jelly — Low Sugar or Honey section of the recipe sheet that comes with Pomona’s Pectin.

If you are making fruit syrup from juice, find the jelly recipe for that fruit in the Cooked Jam, Jelly — Low Sugar or Honey section of the recipe sheet that comes with Pomona’s Pectin.

Use ¼ the amount of pectin in the recipe. All of the other ingredients in the recipe stay the same.

Fruit Syrup Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Prepare fruit or juice.

3. Measure mashed fruit or juice into sauce pan.

4. Add calcium water and lemon or lime juice (if called for in the recipe) and mix well.

5. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix correct amount of pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

6. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the mixture comes back up to a boil. Once the mixture returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

7. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Strawberry Jam Sweetened with Juice Concentrate

Photo by Kyle McDonald https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Photo by Kyle McDonald https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Strawberry Jam Sweetened with Juice Concentrate is a cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Strawberry Jam with Juice Concentrate Ingredients

3 cups mashed strawberries
2 teaspoons calcium water
1 cup juice concentrate (white grape or apple, no sugar added – can be found in the freezer section of a grocery store)
2 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Strawberry Jam with Juice Concentrate Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Wash, hull, and mash strawberries. Measure mashed strawberries into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and mix well.

4. Bring juice concentrate to a boil in a separate sauce pan. Put boiling concentrate in cup for immersion blender, or in food processor, or in blender. Add pectin. It is very important to vent the lid (if there is one) to let steam out. Don’t use an enclosed blender that can’t be vented. Blend for 10 seconds, then stop and scrape down the sides so all pectin clumps are in or on the liquid. Then blend for a full minute until all powder is totally dissolved.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-concentrate. Stir for 1 minute while mixture returns to a full boil. Remove from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

Print

Strawberry Jam — Unsweetened, Sweetened with Stevia Concentrate, or Very Lightly Sweetened

Photo by Kyle McDonald https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Photo by Kyle McDonald https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

This Strawberry Jam is a cooked jam that is made with no sweetener at all, stevia concentrate, or a very small amount of sugar or honey,  and Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Unsweetened Strawberry Jam Ingredients

4 cups mashed strawberries
2 teaspoons calcium water
¾ cup water or unsweetened juice
2 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Unsweetened Strawberry Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Wash, hull, and mash strawberries. Measure mashed strawberries into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and mix well.

4. Bring water or unsweetened juice to a boil in a separate sauce pan. Put boiling water or unsweetened juice in cup for immersion blender, or in food processor, or in blender. Add pectin. It is very important to vent the lid (if there is one) to let steam out. Don’t use an enclosed blender that can’t be vented. Blend for 10 seconds, then stop and scrape down the sides so all pectin clumps are in or on the liquid. Then blend for a full minute until all powder is totally dissolved.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-water or pectin-juice. Stir for 1 minute while mixture returns to a full boil. Remove from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Option: To sweeten with Stevia concentrate or a small amount of any other sweetener, add sweetener to taste in Step 5 before removing from the heat. Cook and stir for 1 additional minute after adding sweetener. Jam made with no sweetener may be kind of tart and rather bland. Sweetener, whichever one you like, helps to bring out the flavor of the fruit.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Concord Grape Jam

Concord Grape Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Concord Grape Jam Ingredients

3 lbs Concord grapes (to make 4 cups prepared grapes)
2 teaspoons calcium water
½ cup up to 1 cup honey or ¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
2 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Concord Grape Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Pop the skins off the grapes and set the skins aside. To separate the pulp and juice from the seeds, either put the skinless grapes through a Foley Mill or cook the skinless grapes with a little water, mash them up, and put through a Foley Mill or strainer. Collect all the juice and pulp and discard the seeds.

3. Puree the skins in a food processor or blender. Add the pureed skins to the juice and pulp and mix together well.

4. Measure 4 cups prepared grapes into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and mix well.

4. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Guava Jelly

Guava fruitGuava Jelly is a low-sugar cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Guava Jelly Ingredients

3 lbs fully ripe guava (to make 4 cups guava juice)
3 cups water
4 teaspoons calcium water
¼ cup lemon juice (if guava is sweet)
¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
4 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Guava Jelly Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Cut thin slices of unpeeled guava and put in sauce pan. Add water. Bring to a boil, turn down heat, and simmer covered for 5 minutes. Mash guava. Pour mashed fruit into a jelly bag and let drip into bowl until dripping stops. Gently squeeze jelly bag for last bit of juice.

3. Measure 4 cups juice into sauce pan.

4. Add calcium water and lemon juice (if needed), and mix well.

5. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

6. Bring juice mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jelly comes back up to a boil. Once the jelly returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

7. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

The guava photo is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

Print

Guava Jam

Guava fruitGuava Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Guava Jam Ingredients

4 cups strained or mashed or pureed guava
4 teaspoons calcium water
¼ cup lemon or lime juice (if guava is sweet)
½ cup up to 1 cup honey or ¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Guava Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Option A: Peel guavas and cut in pieces or cut unpeeled guavas in half and scoop out pulp. Place pulp or pieces in sauce pan with a little water. Bring to a boil then turn down heat. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until fruit is soft. Strain softened pulp through a food mill or sieve to remove seeds. Seeds are very hard and must be removed.

2. Option B: Cut guavas in half and scoop out the center area containing the seeds. Seeds are very hard and must be removed. Then scoop out the rest of the guava pulp and mash if soft or puree with blender or food processor if firm.

3. Measure guava pulp into sauce pan.

4. Add calcium water and lemon juice or lime juice (if needed), and mix well.

5. Measure sweetener into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

6. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

7. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

The guava photo is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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I am a fan for life!!!

I ordered Pomona’s Pectin online a few months ago after someone posted on another canning site that this is the only way they will make their jams and jellies because it had very little sugar. I ended up giving all my jams and jellies away because it was way too sweet for me, so yesterday I tried the pectin for the first time and made a blackberry blueberry jam and blueberry lemon jam . . . Omg I am sold for life!!

Now I wonder why I waited so long to try it. My jams now taste like fruit and not sugar . . . happy happy girl! Can’t wait for summer to try some more different flavors, and now I definitely have to order your book. Thank you for this wonderful product.

And did I mention how many attempts at jam failed? And people would say just use it as syrup. Well I didn’t want syrup; I wanted jam. I now know that I will no longer have that problem.

Sue Duncan
Orangevale, CA
February 28, 2014

Winter Jam Greetings: Cold Comfort Jelly, Rose Hip Jam, and Jam Cake for Valentine’s Day

 

February 2014 – #8

Greetings from the Frozen North–

Let’s Make Jam!

Photo from UnofficialNetworks.com
We at Pomona’s hope that you are surviving this historic winter. For a little diversion from shoveling snow, we bring you some great jam recipes.

Allison Carroll Duffy, from Maine, brings us Cold Comfort Jelly; and Becky Hoff, from Minnesota, shares recipes for Rose Hip Jam and Jam Cake — perfect for Valentine’s Day.

 

CanningCraft Creates: Cold Comfort Jelly

by Allison Carroll Duffy

When I was a kid, whenever my siblings or I were in bed with a cough, sore throat, or otherwise nasty cold, my stepmom would make us a big mug of honey-lemon-ginger “tea.” Nothing more than boiling water and lemon juice infused with ginger root and sweetened with a bit of honey, it was a simple concoction, but it provided welcome comfort – at least a little bit — when we were sick.

When I met my husband, I learned that he had long relied on a similar anti-cold brew that also included garlic and cayenne pepper . . . Because we drink this tea a lot, I thought it would be handy to adapt it into a jelly — a tea “concentrate” of sorts. . . .

Read More and Get the Cold Comfort Jelly Recipe Here.

 

Harmony Garden Club: Learn, Jam, Eat

by Becky Hoff

The first snowfall in Harmony coincided with the November meeting of the Club this year. Harmony, a small town in SE Minnesota, population 1,020, is known as “The Biggest Little Town in Southern Minnesota.” In warm months, tourists bike on the Harmony-Preston Valley State Bike Trail, take tours of Niagara Cave, and learn about the Harmony-Canton Amish, an old order Amish community living in the country near Harmony. (Check out www.exploreharmony.com if you are curious about our town!)                                                     Becky at the Garden Club

We meet once a month to discuss all things garden related: vegetable gardening, fruit trees, landscaping, straw bale gardening, cooking with fresh herbs, garden art — you name it, we’ve talked about it. The club serves as a study group for those who want to learn about and promote amateur gardening. As a member for the last three years, I can testify that I have learned a lot from the wealth of knowledge and talent in this group! So I was quite flattered when asked to lead a discussion on home canning.

All levels of canning expertise were represented in the room. Some have been canning for years, others used to but don’t anymore, and still others have never tried. Regardless of experience level, I tell everyone the same thing when I talk about canning: Read your instructions and do as they say!

This may seem simple but so many mistakes can be prevented if you read through your recipes and instructions before even turning on the stove. It is equally important to have your tools and ingredients laid out and ready so you are not scrambling around when it’s time to fill the jars.

I love to talk about low-sugar canning. People want homemade preserves like their mom or grandma used to make, but they don’t want the 5 or more cups of sugar that go into a typical batch of jam. Traditional recipes were developed at a time when sugar was needed to help preserve the food, but also more calories were burned through the course of a day. We just don’t need that kind of caloric intake these days! Fortunately we can get away with using a lot less sugar thanks to new products and modern canning processes.
Becky’s Canning Shelves

If you don’t want to go overboard on the sugar, I recommend Pomona’s Universal Pectin.  Over the past few years I have switched exclusively to Pomona’s for all of my jam making. The jams turn out great, and no one even notices that the sugar is cut at least in half. The end products in no way remind you of “diet jam,” they are just plain good preserves.

In Garden Club we traditionally end the evening with coffee and dessert, and so I made a Rombauer Jam Cake from the classic cookbook, Joy of Cooking. I made it with Blueberry Jam instead of the usual Raspberry or Blackberry — Blue Spice Cake never tasted so good! I also made a batch of Any Kind of Jam & Oatmeal Bars with a combination of Rose Hip and RhubyRazz jams.


Becky’s Blueberry and RhubyRazz Jams

I love sharing information, ideas, and good food with friends. And I’m very happy to share my recipes for Rose Hip Jam, Blue Spice Rombauer Jam Cake, and Any Kind of Jam & Oatmeal Bars with all Pomona’s Jam Notes readers. Hope you have as much fun learning, jamming, and eating as we do at the Harmony Garden Club.

Pomona’s News

We are working on a new page for our website: My Jam Didn’t Jell — How Can I Fix It? If you’d like to volunteer to read our draft and give us feedback, email info@pomonapectin.com.


Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin makes a wonderful gift for yourself, a friend, or family member, any time of the year. If you like Pomona’s, you’ll LOVE our book.
Available everywhere books are sold.

New recipes have been added to our website recently. Here are a few:

Lilikoi Jelly
Red Wine Jelly
White Wine Jelly
Lemon Jelly
Orange Jam
Ground Cherry Jam
Apple Pie Jam

We hope you enjoyed this issue of Jam Notes. We are always interested in any comments, questions, or ideas you’d like to share with us: info@pomonapectin.com.

 

  ~~~~~

Copyright © , All rights reserved.
Jam Notes is published 3 times each year: February, June, and September. We send “Updates” when we have a new blog post from Allison Carroll Duffy.Our mailing address is:                                           

CanningCraft Creates: Cold Comfort Jelly

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

If you want to be notified when Allison Carroll Duffy’s guest blog posts arrive, subscribe to Jam Notes  in the sidebar to the right of this page. Subscribers get “updates” via email.

Here’s Allison:

When I was a kid, whenever my siblings or I were in bed with a cough, sore throat, or otherwise nasty cold, my stepmom would make us a big mug of honey-lemon-ginger “tea.” Nothing more than boiling water and lemon juice infused with ginger root and sweetened with a bit of honey, it was a simple concoction, but it provided welcome comfort – at least a little bit — when we were sick.

When I met my husband, I learned that he had long relied on a similar anti-cold brew that also included garlic and cayenne pepper. Sipping a hot liquid of most any kind feels good when you have a cold, but beyond this, most of these ingredients have anti-bacterial properties, which certainly doesn’t hurt when it comes to fighting a cold.

Even when I’m not sick I enjoy this “tea,” and these days my favorite version of it includes a lot of lemon and ginger, along with honey and a bit of cayenne pepper. It’s a favorite around our house, especially this winter when it’s been so cold here in Maine. Sipping a hot mug by the wood stove is a delightful way to warm up.

DSCN3445Because we drink this tea so much, I thought it would be handy to adapt it into a jelly — a tea “concentrate” of sorts. This way, we simply scoop a couple of spoonfuls of the jelly into a mug, add boiling water, mix well, and enjoy a quick and easy mug of tea!

The jelly by itself is pretty intense (very lemony and with a bit of heat), though I do, on occasion, eat it plain or on toast. For tea, I find that 2 tablespoons of jelly per cup of boiling water works well, though you might want more or less jelly depending on your taste.

Cold Comfort Jelly

Cold Comfort Jelly is a low-honey cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Cold Comfort Jelly Ingredients

DSCN3429¼ pound fresh ginger root
2½ cups water
10-15 lemons (enough to yield 2 cups of freshly squeezed lemon juice)
¼ teaspoon cayenne powder
4 teaspoons calcium water
1½ cups honey, divided
4 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Cold Comfort Jelly Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

DSCN34402. Slice the ginger root into thin pieces–1/4 inch thick or less. Place the sliced ginger into a sauce pan, add the 2 1/2 cups water, cover with a lid, and bring the mixture to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat slightly and continue to cook, still covered, for 15 minutes. Then, remove from the heat.

3. Pour the mixture through a strainer into a large, heat-proof measuring cup or bowl. Discard the ginger pieces (or use them for something else). Measure out 2 cups of the ginger-infused liquid. If you have more liquid than you need, remove as much liquid as necessary to meet the 2 cup measurement. If you don’t have enough of the ginger-infused liquid, simply add more water to meet the 2 cup measurement.

4. Juice the lemons. Pour the freshly-squeezed lemon juice through a fine mesh strainer. If necessary, use your fingers to press the pulp against the strainer, extracting as much juice as possible. Discard any seeds or pulp remaining in the strainer. Measure out 2 cups of the lemon juice. (If you have extra, you can use it for something else.)

DSCN3423

5. Combine the 2 cups of the ginger- infused liquid and the 2 cups of lemon juice in a sauce pan. Add the cayenne powder and calcium water, then stir to combine.

6. In a separate bowl, combine 3/4 cup of the honey and the pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

7. Bring the ginger-lemon liquid to rolling boil over high heat. Add the honey-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Add the remaining 3/4 cup honey, and stir to dissolve the honey while returning the mixture to a boil. Then, remove it from the heat.

8. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jelly, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

9. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

10. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then, remove jars from canner.

11. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then, confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and Photos by Allison Carroll Duffy.

Printable Copy of the Cold Comfort Jelly recipe only.

To learn more about Allison, visit her CanningCraft blog.

Cold Comfort Jelly

DSCN3445Cold Comfort Jelly is a low-honey cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy. This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Cold Comfort Jelly Ingredients

DSCN3429¼ pound fresh ginger root
2½ cups water
10-15 lemons (enough to yield 2 cups of freshly squeezed lemon juice)
¼ teaspoon cayenne powder
4 teaspoons calcium water
1½ cups honey, divided
4 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Cold Comfort Jelly Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

DSCN34402. Slice the ginger root into thin pieces–1/4 inch thick or less. Place the sliced ginger into a sauce pan, add the 2 1/2 cups water, cover with a lid, and bring the mixture to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat slightly and continue to cook, still covered, for 15 minutes. Then, remove from the heat.

3. Pour the mixture through a strainer into a large, heat-proof measuring cup or bowl. Discard the ginger pieces (or use them for something else). Measure out 2 cups of the ginger-infused liquid. If you have more liquid than you need, remove as much liquid as necessary to meet the 2 cup measurement. If you don’t have enough of the ginger-infused liquid, simply add more water to meet the 2 cup measurement.

4. Juice the lemons. Pour the freshly-squeezed lemon juice through a fine mesh strainer. If necessary, use your fingers to press the pulp against the strainer, extracting as much juice as possible. Discard any seeds or pulp remaining in the strainer. Measure out 2 cups of the lemon juice. (If you have extra, you can use it for something else.)

DSCN3423

5. Combine the 2 cups of the ginger- infused liquid and the 2 cups of lemon juice in a sauce pan. Add the cayenne powder and calcium water, then stir to combine.

6. In a separate bowl, combine 3/4 cup of the honey and the pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

7. Bring the ginger-lemon liquid to rolling boil over high heat. Add the honey-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Add the remaining 3/4 cup honey, and stir to dissolve the honey while returning the mixture to a boil. Then, remove it from the heat.

8. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jelly, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

9. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

10. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then, remove jars from canner.

11. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then, confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and Photos by Allison Carroll Duffy.

Read Allison’s full blog post for Cold Comfort Jelly.

To learn more about Allison, visit her CanningCraft blog.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Rose Hip Jam

Photo by: http://www.bealtainecottage.com

Rugosa Rose Hips — Photo by http://www.bealtainecottage.com

Rugosa Rose

Rugosa Rose — Photo by Katie Meyers

Created and contributed by Becky Hoff, Rose Hip Jam is a low-sugar cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Becky says, “Rose hips are the fruit of the rose bush. In my yard I am lucky enough to have a hedge of Rugosa roses, which in my opinion produce the best hips for jam making. They are tart and delicious, like a cross between an apple and a berry – but they are not very big. They are harvested in the late summer or fall when they are a bright reddish orange.”

Yield: 3 to 4 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

How to Make Rose Hip Puree

There are two schools of thought on how to make Rose Hip Jam. Some say you should slice open every single hip, use a teaspoon to scrape out the seeds, discard the seeds, and only use what is left to make your jam. I tried this once, and gave up on it about 1½ hours into the project. It was tedious and time consuming, and I didn’t get very far. I cut the remaining hips in half and proceeded as below.

My (lazy) method involves cutting the rose hips in half, simmering them for about 20 minutes in enough water to keep them from sticking, mashing well, and pressing the pulp through a strainer. The resulting puree is then used to make the jam. It took about two and a half quarts of whole rose hips to make three cups of puree.

Rose Hip Jam Ingredients

3 cups of strained rose hip puree
3 teaspoons calcium water
3 Tablespoons lemon juice
1½ cups sugar
1½ teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder
(For a firmer jell, use up to 2¼ teaspoons pectin.)

Rose Hip Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure fruit into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and lemon juice, and mix well.

4. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

This jam has an easily spreadable consistency due to the amount of pectin used and pureeing the rose hips. It is sweet-tart and good, and when you’re slathering this jam on your breakfast toast in the winter, it brightens up your morning considerably. Of course you could go through the trouble and effort of slicing and deseeding all of your rose hips before cooking them down if you wanted a chunkier jam. This might be a reasonable job for a group of people – grab some friends, a bottle or two of wine, and get to work!

Rose Hip Jam on Toast

Rose Hip Jam on Toast
Photo by Becky Hoff

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Blue Spice Rombauer Jam Cake

This recipe is adapted by Becky Hoff from the 1975 edition of Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer and Marion Rombauer Becker.

Blue Spice Rombauer Jam Cake Ingredients

1½ cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon double-acting baking powder
½ teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon cloves
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon nutmeg
6 Tablespoons butter or shortening
1 cup packed brown sugar
2 eggs
3 tablespoons cultured sour cream *
1 cup rather firm blueberry jam (the original recipe calls for raspberry or blackberry)
½ cup broken nut meats (optional)

Blue Spice Rombauer Jam Cake Directions

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

2. Have all ingredients at about 70 degrees F. (To do this, take refrigerated items out and set them on the counter for a few hours prior to mixing.)

3. Sift, then measure the flour.

4. Resift the flour with the baking powder, baking soda, cloves, cinnamon, and nutmeg.

5. Cream the butter or shortening with the sugar until light.

6. Beat the eggs into the creamed butter and sugar, one at a time.

7. Beat in the sour cream.

8. Stir the flour mixture into the butter mixture until barely blended.

9. Stir in the jam.

10. Stir in the nuts, if using.

11. Pour the batter into a greased tube pan. Bake about ½ hour or until done. Test by sticking a toothpick into the center of your cake. If the cake is done, then the toothpick may come out a bit sticky, but not wet with batter.

* A note on cultured sour cream: Cultured sour cream is a product that is soured by fermentation, in the same manner that yogurt is prepared. Many commercial varieties of sour cream are soured by adding an acidic ingredient instead of by means of fermentation. You could certainly use any type of sour cream for this recipe, but if you would like to stick to the original directions, look for sour cream that contains “live active cultures.” You may also substitute plain yogurt that contains live active cultures. And although I have not tried this, I suspect that buttermilk would make an acceptable substitute as well.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Lilikoi Jelly

Lilikoi Jelly is a low-sugar cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Lilikoi Jelly Ingredients

4 ½ to 5 lbs fresh lilikoi to make 2 cups juice
Or 2 cups frozen, unsweetened passion fruit pulp (e.g. Goya brand), defrosted.

To prepare fresh lilikoi: cut fruit in half. Use a spoon to remove the pulp and seeds from the rind. Put the seedy pulp in a Food Mill and turn the crank until you have produced 2 cups of seedless juice.

Make Lilikoi Jelly with:
2 cups lilikoi juice
2 cups water
2 teaspoons calcium water
2 cups sugar
3 to 4 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Lilikoi Jelly Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure fruit juice and water into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and mix well.

4. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

This recipe was adapted from a recipe on the My Lilikoi Kitchen blog in order to create a low-sugar Lilikoi Jelly recipe.

http://www.mylilikoikitchen.com/2013/01/26/lilikoi-jelly-passion-fruit/

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Red Wine Jelly

Red Wine Jelly is a low-sugar cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: about 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Red Wine Jelly Ingredients

4 cups of any red wine you like
2 teaspoons calcium water
1/4 cup lemon juice
3/4 cup up to 2 cups sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Red Wine Jelly Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure wine into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and lemon juice and mix well.

4. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

5. Bring wine mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat. Remove cinnamon stick (if using).

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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White Wine Jelly

White Wine Jelly is a low-sugar cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 2 to 3 cups

Before You Begin: Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

White Wine Jelly Ingredients

1½ cups Chardonnay or White Zinfandel (or any blush or white wine)
½ cup orange juice
1 teaspoon calcium water
2 Tablespoons lemon juice
½ teaspoon grated orange peel (optional)
½ cup up to 1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon Pomona’s Pectin powder

White Wine Jelly Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure wine and orange juice into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water, lemon juice, and grated orange peel (if using), and mix well.

4. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

5. Bring wine mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1  minute to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Lemon Jelly

photo by Michel Scalvenzi http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

photo by Michel Scalvenzi
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Lemon Jelly is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Lemon Jelly Ingredients

2 cups fresh squeezed lemon juice (with pulp if you want)
2 cups water (lemon juice is too acid to jell if you do not cut it with water)
3 teaspoons calcium water
2 cups sugar OR 1 cup honey
4 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Lemon Jelly Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure lemon juice (with or without pulp) into sauce pan.

3. Add water and calcium water, and mix well.

4. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Orange Jam

532px-Ambersweet_orangesOrange Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Feel free to use any type of oranges or a mixture of oranges – valencia, navel, cara cara, blood oranges, mandarins, tangerines, satsumas, mineolas. 

Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Orange Jam Ingredients

4 cups pulpy juice (see below for options of how to prepare)
2 teaspoons calcium water
¼ cup lemon juice
½ cup up to 1 cup honey or ¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Orange Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure pulpy juice into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and lemon juice and mix well.

4. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Options for Preparation of Pulpy Juice:

A. Use a citrus juicer that renders both juice and pulp, but holds back seeds and membranes.

B. Peel, section, remove seeds, cut off any especially fibrous membrane, and chop enough oranges to yield 4 cups of chopped orange. Put in a sauce pan with 1/3 cup of water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes. Measure out 4 cups of simmered orange mixture for making the jam.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Thank you so much for offering this product.

It is nice to have a low sugar option available, that is truly low sugar! Measuring out the sugar for recipes made by other pectin companies always put me in a bad mood because I knew I was hurting my family’s health with so much sugar. I just ordered six boxes of your pectin online and can’t wait until it arrives!!!

This is the first time I will be using your product and I thoroughly enjoyed watching your 8 minute video before making the purchase. My husband and mother are thrilled about your product, as well, because they are tired of jams and jellies that are too sweet.

Keep doing what you are doing. :)

Hessy Williams
Clemson, SC
December 4, 2013

Lilikoi (Passion Fruit)-Mango Jam

Kona's Earthly Delights Farm Jam

Kona’s Earthly Delights Farm Jam

Lilikoi (Passion Fruit)-Mango Jam is a low-sugar cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

This recipe was contributed by Bonnie Perata of Kona’s Earthly Delights Farm on the big island of Hawaii.

Yield: about 8 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Lilikoi (Passion Fruit)-Mango Jam Ingredients

5 cups mango puree (see below)
2 cups mashed passion fruit (lilikoi — see below)
7 teaspoons calcium water
½ cup lemon juice
1 ½ cups sugar
5 ½ teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Lilikoi (Passion Fruit)-Mango Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure fruit into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and lemon juice, and mix well.

4. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

To prepare mango puree: You can use fresh ripe mangoes or frozen & defrosted
mango chunks. If mango is stringy, it works well to puree it with an immersion
(stick) blender because the strings will stick to the head of the blender and be
easy to remove. Don’t liquefy the mango.

To prepare passion fruit: If using fresh ripe passion fruit, you can knock the fruit
off the seeds by pulsing in a blender. The seeds are edible and can be included
in the jam if you like. Otherwise, strain the seeds out through a fine mesh sieve.
You can juice the passion fruit with a juicer; the final result will not be as clear.
Frozen, defrosted passion fruit will also work.

Finding tropical fruit: Often Asian and Specialty stores carry frozen tropical
fruits and/or purees. One brand to look for is Goya.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Jam Notes Update: Honeyed Pear-Lemon Marmalade

 

November 2013 – Jam Notes Update

It’s pear season and Allison Carroll Duffy, author of Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin, is offering us a new delight:
Allison says:  “Sweet, sour, and delicious . . . the honey contributes a bit of warmth and depth, and the lemon peels add a very subtle touch of bitter. Perfect slathered on a piece of toast with a bit of butter on a cold, late Fall morning.”

Here are some other good holiday recipes, newly added to our website:
Apple Pie Jam
Pomegranate Jelly
Persimmon Jam
Cranberry Jelly
Cranberry Sauce
Cranberry-Habanero Jelly
Jelled Fruit Candy

Pomona’s Pectin is proud to be a sponsor. To see the list of participants, click here.

This is our last Jam Notes in 2013. You’ll hear from us again in February 2014. Connie, Paul, and Mary Lou wish you Happy Holidays and a Happy New Year!

Thank you for subscribing to Jam Notes and, of course, Happy Jamming!

Copyright © Workstead Industries , All rights reserved.
                

 

CanningCraft Creates: Honeyed Pear-Lemon Marmalade

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

If you want to be notified when Allison Carroll Duffy’s guest blog posts arrive, subscribe to Jam Notes  in the sidebar to the right of this page. Subscribers get “updates” via email.

Here’s Allison:

I love apples, but if I had to choose, I’d have to say that pears are my favorite fall fruit. I love the intense sweetness and creamy flesh of a perfectly ripe pear.

But this relatively short window of perfection comes and goes quickly. Eat a pear too soon and it’s likely to be hard and not all that sweet, but wait too long and your pear will become a whole lot of sweet mush.

Pears, unlike apples, are best picked when not yet ripe, and need some time off the tree to develop ideal texture and sweetness. So, when you buy your pears – whether it be from the grocery store or a local orchard – they’ll likely need a few days on your counter before they’re ready to use.

It’s pretty easy to tell when Bartletts are ripe: they turn from green to yellow as they ripen. But with most other types of pears, color doesn’t change much, so you need to rely on feel to determine when they’re ready. If the pear feels firm in your hand but will yield just slightly to gentle pressure from your fingertips around the stem area, it’s ripe.

DSCN1847

You’ll want to use your newly ripe pears quickly so they don’t become mushy. It’s possible to make a good jam with mushy, overripe pears, but for this recipe it’s important to use pears that are still firm. This is because the recipe calls for pear chunks (rather than mashed pear, which is what’s usually needed for jam), and the chunks need to be firm enough to remain mostly intact when cooked. I used Bartletts when I made this recipe, but any variety will work well as long as the pears are ripe and firm.

This recipe also calls for lemons, which offset the sweetness of the pears in a lovely way. Use organic lemons if possible, especially since you’ll be using some of the peel. The resulting marmalade is sweet, sour, and delicious. Honey contributes a bit of warmth and depth, and the peels add a very subtle touch of bitter – perfect slathered on a piece of toast with a bit of butter on a cold, late Fall morning.

Honeyed Pear-Lemon Marmalade

DSCN1963Honeyed Pear-Lemon Marmalade is a low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Honeyed Pear-Lemon Marmalade Ingredients

2 ¼ pounds pears
4 lemons, divided
1 cup water
1 cup honey
4 teaspoons calcium water
2 ½ teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Honeyed Pear-Lemonade Marmalade Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Peel the pears and remove cores. Discard peels and cores. Slice the pears into small (about ¾ inch) chunks, then set aside.

DSCN1851

3. Wash lemons thoroughly. Using a vegetable peeler, remove the yellow part of the peel from 2 of the lemons. Then slice these peels into thin, length-wise strips about 1 inch long and place in a sauce pan.

DSCN1826

4. Remove and discard the remaining white pith from the two peeled lemons. Pull these lemons apart into segments, and slice these segments into small pieces. Remove and discard any seeds, then add these lemons to the sauce pan.

5. Slice the remaining 2 lemons in half and squeeze out their juice. Set aside ¼ cup of the lemon juice. Add any remaining lemon juice to the sauce pan.

6. Add the 1 cup of water to the lemon mixture in the sauce pan. Cover mixture and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat slightly and cook, covered, for 12 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the pears and turn the heat up to high to bring the mixture back up to a boil. Reduce the heat slightly and cook the mixture, still covered and stirring occasionally, for another 5 minutes.

7. Remove the pan from the heat, empty the pear-lemon mixture into a bowl or other heat-proof container, then measure out 4 cups of the mixture. (If you have any left over, you can use it for something else.) Pour the measured quantity of the mixture back into the sauce pan. Add the remaining ¼ cup lemon juice and the calcium water, then stir to combine.

8. In a separate bowl, combine the honey and pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

9. Bring the pear-lemon mixture to a full boil over high heat. Add the honey-pectin mixture and stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve the pectin. Return the marmalade to a full boil, then remove from heat.

10. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with marmalade, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

11. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

12. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then, remove jars from canner.

13. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then, confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

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Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Printable Copy of The Recipe Only Here!

Honeyed Pear-Lemon Marmalade

DSCN1963Honeyed Pear-Lemon Marmalade is a low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin. She says:

DSCN1847“It’s possible to make a good jam with mushy, overripe pears, but for this recipe it’s important to use pears that are still firm. This is because the recipe calls for pear chunks (rather than mashed pear, which is what’s usually needed for jam), and the chunks need to be firm enough to remain mostly intact when cooked. I used Bartletts when I made this recipe, but any variety will work well as long as the pears are ripe and firm.

“This recipe also calls for lemons, which offset the sweetness of the pears in a lovely way. Use organic lemons if possible, especially since you’ll be using some of the peel. The resulting marmalade is sweet, sour, and delicious. Honey contributes a bit of warmth and depth, and the peels add a very subtle touch of bitter – perfect slathered on a piece of toast with a bit of butter on a cold, late Fall morning.”

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Honeyed Pear-Lemonade Marmalade Ingredients

2 ¼ pounds pears
4 lemons, divided
1 cup water
1 cup honey
4 teaspoons calcium water
2 ½ teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Honeyed Pear-Lemonade Marmalade Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Peel the pears and remove cores. Discard peels and cores. Slice the pears into small (about ¾ inch) chunks, then set aside.

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3. Wash lemons thoroughly. Using a vegetable peeler, remove the yellow part of the peel from 2 of the lemons. Then slice these peels into thin, length-wise strips about 1 inch long and place in a sauce pan.

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4. Remove and discard the remaining white pith from the two peeled lemons. Pull these lemons apart into segments, and slice these segments into small pieces. Remove and discard any seeds, then add these lemons to the sauce pan.

5. Slice the remaining 2 lemons in half and squeeze out their juice. Set aside ¼ cup of the lemon juice. Add any remaining lemon juice to the sauce pan.

6. Add the 1 cup of water to the lemon mixture in the sauce pan. Cover mixture and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat slightly and cook, covered, for 12 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the pears and turn the heat up to high to bring the mixture back up to a boil. Reduce the heat slightly and cook the mixture, still covered and stirring occasionally, for another 5 minutes.

7. Remove the pan from the heat, empty the pear-lemon mixture into a bowl or other heat-proof container, then measure out 4 cups of the mixture. (If you have any left over, you can use it for something else.) Pour the measured quantity of the mixture back into the sauce pan. Add the remaining ¼ cup lemon juice and the calcium water, then stir to combine.

8. In a separate bowl, combine the honey and pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

9. Bring the pear-lemon mixture to a full boil over high heat. Add the honey-pectin mixture and stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve the pectin. Return the marmalade to a full boil, then remove from heat.

10. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with marmalade, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

11. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

12. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then, remove jars from canner.

13. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then, confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

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Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Read Allison’s full blog post for this recipe, or visit her blog: CanningCraft.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Persimmon Jam

Creative Commons Photo by Kkoshy

Creative Commons Photo by Kkoshy

Persimmon Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Persimmon Jam Ingredients

4 cups pureed or mashed persimmon pulp (see step 2 below)
4 teaspoons calcium water
¼ cup lemon juice
½ cup up to 1 cup honey or ¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
2 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Persimmon Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Remove calyx from 5 to 6 large, fully ripe Hachiya persimmons or about 8 average size Fuyu persimmons. For Hachiyas, scoop out pulp and puree it. Don’t use the peel. For Fuyus, peel, chop, and mash or peel, chop, and puree. If Fuyus are too firm to mash or puree, then peel, chop, and put the pieces in a sauce pan with a little water. Simmer until soft, then mash or puree.

3. Measure 4 cups of mashed or pureed pulp into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and lemon juice, and mix well.

4. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Optional:  Add 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon when adding the calcium water and lemon juice.

Photo Credit: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/    http://www.flickr.com/photos/kkoshy/

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Pomegranate Jelly

Connie's Pomegranate Jelly

Connie’s Pomegranate Jelly

Pomegranate Jelly is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Pomegranate Jelly Ingredients

4 cups pomegranate juice
4 teaspoons calcium water
4 teaspoons lemon juice (optional)
½ cup up to 1 cup honey or ¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
3 to 4 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder
(3 teaspoons gives a softer jell; 4 teaspoons gives a firmer jell.)

Pomegranate Jelly Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure juice into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and lemon juice, and mix well.

4. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

5. Bring juice mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Note: Use bottled, unsweetened pomegranate juice or reconstituted juice from unsweetened frozen concentrate. Or extract your own pomegranate juice from fresh pomegranates. Best instructions we’ve found for seeding and juicing a pomegranate are on a blog called The Shiksa in the Kitchen.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Blackberry Port Jam

Photo by Mia Valcarcel

Photo by Mia Valcarcel

Blackberry Port Jam is a low-sugar cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

This recipe was adapted from Better Homes & Gardens Special Interest Publication Canning Magazine by Mia Valcarcel, who wanted to make it with Pomona’s Pectin.

Yield: about 4 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Blackberry Port Jam Ingredients

2 cups mashed blackberries (about 4 cups whole berries)
1 ½ teaspoons calcium water
1 cup port wine
2 tablespoons lemon juice
½ cup sugar
1 ½ teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder
Additional sugar if needed (depends on how tart your blackberries are)
¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon (optional, depends on your port flavors)

Blackberry Port Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure mashed blackberries into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water, port wine, and lemon juice, and mix well.

4. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat. Taste the mixture to see if you need to add more sugar. This will depend on how sweet or tart your blackberries are. If adding more sugar, turn the heat back on, stir well while mixture returns to a full boil, then remove from heat. Add cinnamon now if desired to help boost the flavors.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Note from Mia: The port I used is from a local Maryland vineyard and contained overtones of chocolate and raspberry. The original recipe called for cloves, but I used cinnamon instead. I think it boosted the flavors more than cloves would have.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Berry Blitz Jam

Berry Blitz Jam is a low-sugar cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin.
Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

From the kitchen of Charlotte Levy, The Seasonal Gourmet, a Pomona’s jam maker in Southern California who sells her jams at the Farmers Market in Ramona.

Yield: 7 to 8 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Berry Blitz Jam Ingredients

5 cups mashed mixed berries (I use raspberries, strawberries, blueberries and just a touch of blackberries)
5 teaspoons calcium water
5 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 ½ cups sugar
3 ¾ to 4 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Berry Blitz Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Combine measured fruit in a Dutch oven or heavy, deep sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and lemon juice, and mix well.

4. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil over medium heat, stirring constantly. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, time for 1 minute and remove it from the heat. Stir for a couple of minutes and skim foam (if desired).

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Charlotte says: Great on toast, pancakes, waffles, etc. Enjoy!

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Ground Cherry Jam

6168044695_2d59551fd3Ground Cherry Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Ground Cherry Jam Ingredients

8 cups of ground cherries
½ cup water

Cook ground cherries with water until they burst and soften and then mash the cherries.

Make Jam with:
4 cups of mashed ground cherries
4 teaspoons calcium water
1/2 cup lemon juice (this fruit requires extra lemon juice for canning safety)
½ cup up to 1 cup honey or ¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Ground Cherry Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure mashed ground cherries into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and lemon juice and mix well.

4. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Photo by Steven Jackson. Taken on September 17, 2011. Used here under this Creative Commons License.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Apple Pie Jam

Apples_on_tree_2011_G1 (1)Apple Pie Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Apple Pie Jam Ingredients

3 to 4 pound of apples (9 to 12 medium apples)
¼ cup up to ½ cup water

Peel, core, and chop apples and put in a sauce pan with the water. Bring to a simmer and simmer covered, stirring and mashing occasionally, until you have chunky or smooth apple sauce. Remove from heat and measure out 4 cups of apple sauce.

Make Jam with:
4 cups of cooked apple sauce
2 tsp calcium water
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp allspice
½ cup honey or maple syrup or ¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
2 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Apple Pie Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Put measured amount of apple sauce into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water, lemon juice, and spices, and mix well.

4. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Option: Feel free to use whatever spice mix you would normally use to make apple pie. Spices should not exceed 1 teaspoon.

If you leave out all of the spices, you will have plain apple jam, delicious in its own right.

Apple Photo credit: By George Chernilevsky (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Cranberry Jelly

Cranberry Jelly is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Cranberry Jelly Ingredients

2 – 12 ounce bags of fresh or frozen cranberries
2 cups of water

Bring above ingredients to a boil then simmer covered on low until the cranberries burst and soften. Drip through a jelly bag to get 4 cups of cranberry juice.

Make Cranberry Jelly with:
4 cups cranberry juice
4 teaspoon calcium water
½ cup up to 1 cup honey or ¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
4 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Cranberry Jelly Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure cranberry juice into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and lime juice (if using) and mix well.

4. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

5. Bring juice to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jelly comes back up to a boil. Once the jelly returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

7. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Jellied Cranberry Sauce

Cranberry Sauce is a low-sweetener cooked sauce made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 2 to 3 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Cranberry Sauce Ingredients

12 ounce package of cranberries
1 ½ cups of water

Bring above ingredients to a boil then simmer covered on low until the cranberries burst and soften. Put mixture through a Foley Mill or strainer to remove skins.

Make Cranberry Sauce with:
2 cups pulpy cranberry juice
1 teaspoon calcium water
2 Tablespoons fresh squeezed lime juice (optional)
½ cup honey
1 ½ teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder
½ cup sugar

Cranberry Sauce Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Prepare pulpy cranberry juice and measure into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and lime juice (if using) and mix well.

4. Measure room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into honey. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-honey mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin.

6. After the pectin is dissolved, add the ½ cup sugar and stir well while the sauce comes back up to a boil. Once the sauce returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

7. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Storage Options: If you don’t want to can (process in boiling water bath) the cranberry sauce, you can put it in the refrigerator once it is cooled and it will keep for 3 weeks. You can also freeze the sauce instead of canning it. For freezing, fill jars to ½” of top. Defrost in refrigerator for a day before eating.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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I made 7 – 1/2 pints and 1 full pint of the BEST EVER Concord Grape Jam!

Hello, fellow real food home cooks! I did it! I made my first-ever batch of homegrown, truly organic Concord Grape jam! With Mary Lou’s encouragement, I plunged into doubling the Concord Grape Butter – left out the spices; cause I wanted Concord Grape Jam; and Voila! I made 7 1/2 pints and 1 full pint jar of the BEST EVER Concord Grape jam! I gifted the pint jar & 3 1/2 pints to the friend who gifted me with her Concord Grapes, and kept the rest!

Everything went well. I used 3 cups of sugar for 6 pounds of grapes; and if I do it again, I will reduce the sugar by a cup…the grapes were that sweet! The jam is so good, it’s disappearing F.A.S.T.! I’ve been invited to strip all the rest of this season’s Concords off the vines, if I want to make more jam…I’m still deciding, but only because I’m in school & I have to budget my time to have time to “JAM”…Hahahah!

Thanks, Mary Lou, for a wonderful, preservative-free product that even a newbie jammer like me can use & have success with! I’m inspired to continue!

Joy Massa
Carlsbad, CA
October 17, 2013

Jelled Fruit Candy — Low Sweetener

Jelled Fruit Candy is a low-sugar or low-honey candy made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Jelled Fruit Candy Ingredients

This recipe uses the ingredients listed on the recipe sheet that comes with the pectin in the section for Cooked Jam, Jelly – Low Sugar or Honey.

If you are making fruit candy from mashed fruit, find the jam recipe for that fruit.

If you are making fruit candy from juice, find the jelly recipe for that fruit.

Double the amount of pectin in the recipe. All of the other ingredients in the recipe stay the same.

To effectively disperse 6 to 8 teaspoons of pectin, we recommend a minimum of 1 cup of sugar or honey. Follow the recipe for maximum amounts of sugar or honey.

Jelled Fruit Candy Directions

1. Prepare fruit or juice.

2. Measure mashed fruit or juice into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and lemon or lime juice (if called for in the recipe) and mix well.

4. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix correct amount of pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the mixture comes back up to a boil. Once the mixture returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Put the mixture in a shallow pan. Allow it to cool then chill in the refrigerator until firm. When the mixture is firm, cut into pieces and coat the pieces in something like powdered sugar and cornstarch to take away the sticky feel.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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It’s fascinating what people do with jam!

 

September 2013 – #7

Community Jamming

It’s fascinating what people do with jam! How about community service? If you’ve thought about turning your interest in local food and your jam-making skills into a socially beneficial project – Read On!
Jammin’ For the Hungry . . .

was started and is coordinated by Sara Power, in Corvallis, Oregon. She says: “We make top of the line jams, jellies, and syrups and donate them to our local food banks. I was thrilled to discover Pomona’s Pectin because it cut our sugar costs dramatically, and makes a healthier product.  It is also less expensive for us to buy in bulk.”Sara Power prepares a
jar of wild blackberry jam.
Jammin’ for the Hungry celebrates 5 years on September 20.  They will have canned jar #12,000. Sara says, “It’s hard to believe that when I started I thought 300 jars was optimistic!They produce the jam in their church’s kitchen most Monday nights for 2 to 3 hours. In addition to the regular volunteers, students from a sustainability class at Oregon State University help out — usually 4 to 6 new students each week. Sara says: “The students are discovering how easy it is to make great jam, and also how great it tastes when it is mostly fruit with just a little bit of sugar.”  
Click here to watch a short video about Jammin’ for the Hungry and Sara Power.Click here for tips on starting your own Jammin’ for the Hungry Project.

League of Urban Canners . . .

An economically independent urban food production cooperative. Keeping fruit off the street and safely in jars, where it belongs!
 

In the spring of 2012, owners of fruit trees throughout Cambridge and Somerville, Massachusetts, began receiving flyers reading: “Got Fruit? Want Jam?” Distributed by a start-up food co-op called the League of Urban Canners (LUrC), the flyers offered tree owners the chance to have their unwanted fruit turned into preserves at no cost. By the end of its first season, LUrC had harvested and canned over two tons of fruit.In addition to making jam, members of the co-op have also made sweet and hard cider, apple and pear sauce, vinegar, chutney, and fruit leathers. Whatever product they make, roughly 10 percent of it goes back to the tree owners, 20 percent goes to the harvesters, and 70 percent goes to the canners.“Harvesting fruit from neighborhood trees is a great way to meet people in your community,” says LUrC member Matthew Schreiner. LuRC Founder Sam Christy points out other benefits of the LUrC model. “LUrC is about learning to work together and share responsibility for food production in our city,” Christy says. According to Christy, LUrC provides many additional services for the harvest sites, including pest management and pruning to improve production.Want to start a harvesting and canning cooperative in your own city? It’s easy. As a cooperative organization, LUrC has no staff and very little overhead. All that’s needed is some flyers and the courage to knock on a few doors.More than 200 people have harvested and canned with LUrC since its founding last year. Today, LUrC has its own harvesting tools and a custom database that keeps track of fruit trees, harvests, and canning sessions.LUrC is happy to share its knowledge and resources with anyone interested in starting a harvesting co-op in their own city. For more information, visit LUrC’s Facebook page here or contact the group directly at urbanapplesauce@gmail.com.
Photos:
Above Left is Zach in the cherry tree, using his climbing gear to get up high.
Above Right is 
Sylvia plucking cherries by hand, pinching and twisting to avoid damaging the fruit spur so it can bear fruit again next year.
Left is Angela with the first mulberry harvest.
~~~~~

Did You Know?

You can make Canned Pie Filling with Pomona’s Pectin! We’ve received so many requests for canned pie filling recipes using Pomona’s. Unfortunately, we are not expert pie makers, but some of our Pomona’s customers are, and they’ve helped us come up with recipes that work. You’ll find an Apple Pie Filling recipe here; a Cardamom Peach Pie Filling recipe here; and a Blueberry Pie Filling recipe here.The Cardamom Peach Pie recipe was created and contributed by Pomona’s user Ashley Baugh. Thanks so much Ashley!If you’re a pie maker and these recipes inspire you to create a pie filling recipe — email it to info@pomonapectin.com and we’ll be happy to share and give you credit.
~~~~~

  The
  Jam
  (S)pot

Puts the Spotlight on a

Pomona’s Jam Maker

Renee Joslyn, Freakin’ Flamingo jams

Tickle Your Tastebuds Pink!
Renee Joslyn, who created Freakin’ Flamingo jams, lives and makes jam in South Miami, Florida. She says of her jams, “Some people paint and some people sculpt, but I play with my food. That’s my niche. You don’t come to Freakin’ Flamingo (the name should be your first clue!) for anything ordinary or normal.” (Get her recipe for Blue Sunshine Jam below.)

Renee says she talked about making jam for so long, that her husband finally put together a “kit” (canning kettle, jar lifter, canning funnel, fancy lid rack, etc.) and gave it to her for her birthday in December 2009.

She made her first jam (a marmalade) in January 2010, as part of the “Can Jam” challenge.  About 100 people signed up – from all over the world – to make a jam or pickle every month with a seasonal ingredient that was pre-chosen.

Hooked From the Start  
After reading and studying everything she could about jam making, Renee started playing with different fruits, herbs, and alcohol, originally inspired by others’ recipes. She discovered she had a knack for making unusual combinations, and that her tropical and Latin inspirations were unique.

Renee says, “When people began telling me that I should sell them (and my husband began to object to the pantry being filled with jam instead of food), I decided to test the waters at a farmers market near my house. I found that even total strangers were intrigued and delighted by the unusual combinations – even inspired to play with my jams in ways that had nothing to do with breakfast!  I started the business officially in 2011.”

Although she didn’t start out with Pomona’s, once Renee discovered it, she never went back. She now uses Pomona’s exclusively and when she teaches the occasional canning class, she tells her students why it’s superior.

Want to Start a Jam-Making Business?
Click here for Renee’s advice.

If you’d like to try one of Renee’s combinations, you’ll find her recipe for Blue Sunshine Jam hereShe is also sharing her recipe for Jam Muffins here.

Renee and Freakin’ Flamingo have both a website and a Facebook page. You can order her unique and freakin’ jams online.

~~~~~
Pomona’s Jam Manufacturers: If you’d like to be in the Jam (S)pot, email info@pomonapectin.com,

If you’re interested in learning more about the benefits of a vegan diet and looking for easy, tasty recipes, try this new e-book written and self-published by Joanne Mumola Williams. It includes a chapter of jam recipes using Pomona’s Pectin. You can read more about the book and get a taste of Joanne’s recipes on her blog, Foods for Long Life.

~~~~~

Virtual Vegan Potluck — You’re Invited!
Have you attended the Virtual Vegan Potluck yet? The 4th potluck will be held on November 16.  Each potluck brings you a vast array of delectable vegan dishes to choose from. And Pomona’s is a proud sponsor. Click on the link above to learn more.

Pomona’s Preserving Book & Pectin & Recipe “Give Away”

Enter the Give Away plus get the recipe for Sunrise Marmalade (pictured above) here. Give Away is open to residents of the U.S. and Canada.

Here is what Allison says about Sunrise Marmalade: “I’m a huge fan of carrot cake, and if it’s possible to have a marmalade version of that delectable dessert, this is it.”

Read Allison’s September Guest Blog Post and get her new recipe for Seedless Blackberry Jam here.

Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin is available in bookstores everywhere as well as online at Amazon or Barnes & Noble. Find additional online sellers or independent brick & mortar stores here. For countries other than the US and Canada, click here.

~~~~~


Tales from
the Jamline . . .

Rrrrring! goes the telephone.  “Help!” says the caller – “I have condensation on the inside of my jars after removing them from the water-bath canner. What did I do wrong and is my jam safe to eat?

You didn’t do anything wrong and yes, your jam is safe to eat. Sometimes condensation happens, but you don’t need to worry about it because the water in the jar has been sterilized during the water bath. So no mold or bacteria should be able to grow in the jar.

It is, however, always a good practice to examine a jar when you take it off the shelf, before you eat it.

First, be sure that you “pop a seal.” A jar that was safely sealed a few months ago can lose its seal on the shelf, although this rarely happens. Then look for identifiable fuzzy mold, a moldy smell, or a fermented (alcoholic) smell. If any of these are present, throw the jar away. It’s not a good idea to eat moldy jam or scrape the mold off and eat what’s below it.

An open jar of low-sweetener jam or jelly can be expected to last about 3 weeks in the refrigerator.

~~~~~

 

We’re Going on VACATION!!!!
Yes, all 3 of us are taking a week off, from September 28 through October 6.What does this mean to you?????
No online orders will be filled that week. No Jamline calls will be taken that week. No website or Facebook comments will be answered that week. Yes, a real vacation. Please get your orders and your questions in by September 26, or wait until October 7.

~~~~~

We now have a Store Locator on our website with 2,500 stores across the U.S. and Canada that carry Pomona’s. Just type in your zip code, postal code, or city and state or province and Voila! you will know right where to go to get your next box of Pomona’s Pectin.

You’ll find the Store Locator here.

No store near you? Feel free to email us information about a store you think would be interested in carrying Pomona’s, and we’ll call them up: info@pomonapectin.com.

~~~~~

Many new recipes have been added to the website recently. Here are a few:

Strawberry-Jalapeno Jam
Ginger-Peach Jam
Merry Mulled Merlot Jam
Special Plum Jam
Herb Jelly
Gooseberry Jelly
Any Kind of Jam & Oatmeal Bars
Chokecherry Jelly
Prickly Pear Cactus Jelly

Cranberry Season is approaching. Buy an extra cranberry bag or two and freeze. That way you’ll have fresh/frozen cranberries to add to jam recipes all year round.

~~~~~

Seven Springs, Pennsylvania hosts the Mother Earth News Fair, Sept. 20 to 22, featuring workshops, speakers, exhibits, and lots of books for sale — including Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin. You’ll find the book at our publisher’s table —  Fair Winds Press. If you’re in the area and looking for a good time, stop by and say hi.

~~~~~

Pomona’s is a small, family-owned and run enterprise. Three of us do it all (Connie Sumberg, Mary Lou Sumberg, and Paul Rooney), along with our wonderful packaging and fulflillment partner in Denver, CO, Western Innovations and our talented website partner, Jeremy Jones.

~~~~~

We Love Your Feedback!
Let us know what you think of Jam Notes.  Email info@pomonapectin.com and Happy Jamming!

Copyright © 2013 Workstead Industries,
All rights reserved.

Honeyed Tomato-Jalapeno Jam

DSCN1280Honeyed Tomato-Jalapeno Jam is a low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy. This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin.

Allison says:

“This jam definitely has a good strong kick, but the honey tempers the heat quite a bit, and adds a pleasing complexity to the jam. It’s delightful on a whole wheat cracker, along with a piece of sharp cheddar cheese.”

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Honeyed Tomato-Jalapeno Jam Ingredients

3¼ pounds tomatoes
¼ cup finely chopped jalapeno peppers
2/3 cup bottled lime juice
4 teaspoons calcium water
1¼ cups honey
4 teaspoons Pomona’s Universal Pectin Powder

DSCN1098

Honeyed Tomato-Jalapeno Jam Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

DSCN11062. Remove skins from tomatoes. To do this, heat a pot of water to boiling, place tomatoes in boiling water — just a couple of tomatoes at a time — for 30 to 60 seconds, or until the skin splits. Remove tomatoes from boiling water and immediately submerge them in a large bowl of ice water. The skins will slip right off. If the skin did not split during blanching (which occasionally happens), simply nick the skin with a paring knife and peel the skin off. Discard the skins.

3. Slice tomatoes in half, remove and discard the cores, then dice the tomatoes.

DSCN1089Place diced tomatoes and the finely-chopped jalapeno peppers in a large sauce pan and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat slightly and cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

5. Remove the pan from the heat, empty the tomato mixture into a bowl or other heat-proof container, then measure out 4 cups of the tomato mixture. (If you have any left over, you can use it for something else.) Pour the measured quantity of the tomato mixture back into the sauce pan. Add lime juice and calcium water, then stir to combine.

6. In a separate bowl, combine the honey and pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

7. Bring the tomato mixture to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the honey-pectin mixture, Then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return the jam to a full boil, then remove from heat.

8. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jam, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

9. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

10. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then, remove jars from canner.

11. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Recipe by Allison Carroll Duffy as one of her occasional guest blog posts on the Pomona’s Pectin website. Read the full blog post here.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

Print

CanningCraft Creates: Honeyed Tomato-Jalapeno Jam

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

If you want to be notified when Allison Carroll Duffy’s guest blog posts arrive, subscribe to Jam Notes  in the sidebar to the right of this page. Subscribers get “updates” via email.

Here’s Allison:

It always seems to me, here in Maine, that our yearly growing and harvesting time frame lags a bit behind that of our neighbors in warmer climates. With April frequently cold and rainy, and consistent heat rare before June, heat-loving crops like tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants that are grown outdoors often don’t reach their peak until late August, and sometimes even early September.

At least that’s the case in my family’s garden. This has been a fantastic tomato year for us, and we enjoyed eating a few of them here and there during August, but true to form, it wasn’t until Labor Day weekend that we started to haul in real quantities of these red beauties. September has been a whirlwind of picking and canning–about 110 pounds down so far (made into sauce, salsa, and crushed tomatoes, primarily), with more to go.

DSCN1106

Now that it’s October, and the vines are still surprisingly full, the big question is how much time is left–for the remaining tomatoes to ripen, and for me to get them inside before the first frost, which could come any day now. Even still, with lots of our tomato staples put up now, these past few days have felt a little less pressured, and I’ve found myself itching to make something new and different. So I thought I’d work up a tomato jam to use up some of our extra, along with some lovely green jalapenos we have growing in the garden as well.

This jam definitely has a good strong kick, but the honey tempers the heat quite a bit, and adds a pleasing complexity to the jam. It’s delightful on a whole wheat cracker, along with a piece of sharp cheddar cheese.

Honeyed Tomato-Jalapeno Jam

DSCN1280Honeyed Tomato-Jalapeno Jam is a low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy. This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Honeyed Tomato-Jalapeno Jam Ingredients

3¼ pounds tomatoes
¼ cup finely chopped jalapeno peppers
2/3 cup bottled lime juice
4 teaspoons calcium water
1¼ cups honey
4 teaspoons Pomona’s Universal Pectin Powder

DSCN1098

Honeyed Tomato-Jalapeno Jam Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Remove skins from tomatoes. To do this, heat a pot of water to boiling, place tomatoes in boiling water — just a couple of tomatoes at a time — for 30 to 60 seconds, or until the skin splits. Remove tomatoes from boiling water and immediately submerge them in a large bowl of ice water. The skins will slip right off. If the skin did not split during blanching (which occasionally happens), simply nick the skin with a paring knife and peel the skin off. Discard the skins.

3. Slice tomatoes in half, remove and discard the cores, then dice the tomatoes.

DSCN10894. Place diced tomatoes and the finely-chopped jalapeno peppers in a large sauce pan and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat slightly and cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

5. Remove the pan from the heat, empty the tomato mixture into a bowl or other heat-proof container, then measure out 4 cups of the tomato mixture. (If you have any left over, you can use it for something else.) Pour the measured quantity of the tomato mixture back into the sauce pan. Add lime juice and calcium water, then stir to combine.

6. In a separate bowl, combine the honey and pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

7. Bring the tomato mixture to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the honey-pectin mixture, Then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return the jam to a full boil, then remove from heat.

8. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jam, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

9. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

10. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then, remove jars from canner.

11. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Recipe by Allison Carroll Duffy. To print the recipe only, click here, scroll to the bottom of the page that comes up, and click the Print button.

My husband is delighted — as a diabetic, he can now enjoy good tasting jam without all the sugar.

I made raspberry-blueberry jam for the very first time using your product. I’m a long time “canner” so was used to measuring out mega amounts of sugar for my jam recipes. I was pleasantly surprised by your wonderful product. Not only was it super easy to use, but the results happened sooner than expected and I ended up with an outstanding batch of almost sugar-free jam.

My husband is delighted because, as a diabetic,  he can now enjoy good tasting jam without all the sugar. Thanks, love this product!

Christy S.
October 9, 2013

So excited about freedom in making my jams and jellies . . .

I had just finished the jamming season, making 20 different jams and jellies, using the slow cook method and commercial liquid and dry pectin. Yesterday, while at a bookstore in Montreal, Canada, I came across the book, Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin. I bought it and just now ordered your pectin product.

I am so very excited about the prospect of so much more freedom in making my jams and jellies. Not only is the reduced sugar a huge plus, the fact that I can keep a quantity of your product on hand indefinitely, without having to run to the store constantly for more boxes of pectin, is also outstanding. With boxes of pectin costing about $6 now, and sugar continuing to rise in price, your product will also cut down significantly on my costs of producing.

I was extremely impressed with the book as a whole. The recipes are wonderful, as I like making my jams and jellies slightly out of the ordinary. I found answers to many questions I had always wondered about (like whether I had to wipe warm water from the lids before placing them on the jars); and I enjoy the way the illustrations are done.

While I am sorely disappointed that I did not know about your product at the beginning of the summer, I really look forward to getting to use it soon.

Sandra Dafler
Montreal, Quebec Canada
October 7, 2013

Tomato Jam

tomato picture 9-13Tomato Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 2 to 3 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Tomato Jam Ingredients

2 cups chopped crushed ripe tomatoes
2 teaspoons calcium water
2 Tablespoons lemon juice
1 Tablespoon grated lemon peel (optional)
¼ cup up to ½ cup honey or ½ cup up to1 cup sugar
2 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Tomato Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Wash, core, chop, and crush tomatoes; or wash, peel, core, chop, and crush tomatoes.

3. Measure chopped, crushed tomatoes into sauce pan.

4. Add calcium water, lemon juice, and grated lemon peel (if using) and mix well.

5. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

6. Bring tomato mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

7. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Option for Tomato-Chili Jam:
In Step 4, add 2 Tablespoons finely chopped & tightly packed fresh basil leaves and 1 teaspoon chili powder and 4 dashes of salt. Proceed with the rest of the recipe.

Option for Spiced Tomato Jam:
In Step 4, any or all of these spices could be added: ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon, ⅛ teaspoon ground cloves, ¼ teaspoon ground allspice.

Photo taken by Paul Stein and used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/legalcode

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

Print

September “Give Away” Winners & Cranberry-Habanero Jelly Recipe

cranberryhabanerojellyTwo names were randomly chosen by Rafflecopter on Thursday, September 26. We are happy to announce that Beth Carroll and Pat Nelson will each be the recipient of one copy of Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin and one box of Pomona’s Pectin.

For the rest of us, below you will find a link to another recipe from the book — Cranberry-Habanero Jelly. I made it recently and so can attest personally that it tastes as good as it looks in the picture.

Our Winners

Beth is from Melrose, Massachusetts. She writes:

“While I used to work in a jam kitchen, as a tour guide and cashier, I didn’t start canning until last summer. My husband decided to start pressure canning to put up all the good stuff we were finding at farmer’s markets, and I decided to try out water-bath canning.

“I tried Pomona’s for the first time this summer, because I found yet another recipe that used it, and I decided it was time to get over my trepidation (for whatever reason, the whole thing with calcium water sounded complicated, which it completely isn’t). Once I got the hang of it, Pomona’s has been pretty much all I’ve used — it’s easy and quick; I love the texture that I get with it; and it’s wonderful to be able to use so much less sugar.

“The Blubarb Jam was an instant hit — I love rhubarb and love having another way to use it. Recently went raspberry picking and came home to put up eight quarter pints of jewel-toned jam — so pretty to look at, and super tasty because it tastes like the berries! Looking forward to trying out more recipes from the book – thanks again!”

Pat is from Milton, Florida. She writes:

“I have never won anything before and to have it be something I really wanted makes it so much nicer. 

“I just learned of Pomona’s Pectin this year and have not tried it, yet. I am not new to canning, but was disabled recently and I have canned everything I could get my hands on this year, out of necessity. Although homemade is so much better than store bought, I have not been happy with my jams and jellies because of the sugar content. I tried the low sugar version and the set was loose. I have heard nothing but positive remarks about Pomona’s Pectin and I know it will solve my problems of too much sugar and allow the star of the jar (fresh fruit) to shine through.

“I love to make Strawberry Jam and Peach Jam. I made Marisa’s McClellan’s (Food in Jars) Cantaloupe Jam and my neighbors thought I was crazy, until they tasted their samples. I am going to make Marisa’s Creamsicle Jelly when my Pomona’s Pectin arrives. After Preserving With Pomona’s Pectin arrives, the sky is the limit.

“Everyone on my Xmas list thanks you. I do not buy gifts; I buy ingredients and make gifts. I’m on pins and needles. I feel like a child waiting for Santa to arrive.”

Our congratulations to both Beth and Pat. Thank you to everyone who participated in our book Give Aways. That’s the end for now, but stay tuned, we may try this again next spring!

And here is the link to the promised recipe from the book — 

Cranberry-Habanero Jelly

 

Cranberry-Habanero Jelly

cranberryhabanerojellyExcerpted from Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin by Allison Carroll Duffy  (Fair Winds Press, June 2013)

Allison says: “Hot pepper aficionados will appreciate the distinctive kick of this habanero pepper jelly, yet it’s mild enough that it can be enjoyed by those who like only very small amounts of heat. The cranberries add a brilliant red hue to this translucent, yellow-flecked jelly. Served with cream cheese and crackers, it makes a gorgeous and spicy addition to any appetizer table. Remember, for canning safety, do not increase the quantity of any peppers in this recipe.”

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Cranberry-Habanero Jelly Ingredients

¼ cup finely chopped cranberries
1 ¼ cups seeded, finely diced yellow bell pepper
2 teaspoons seeded, minced habanero pepper
1 ½ cups white vinegar
2 ½ cups sugar, divided
2 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder
2 teaspoons calcium water

Cranberry-Habanero Jelly Directions

1. Wash your jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring canner to a rolling boil, and boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize them. (Add 1 extra minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.) Reduce heat and allow jars to remain in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan, heat to a low simmer, and hold until ready to use.

2. Combine chopped cranberries, diced yellow pepper, minced habanero pepper, and vinegar in a saucepan. Cover, bring to a boil, and then reduce heat and simmer, still covered, for 5 minutes. Remove from heat.

3. In a separate bowl, combine pectin powder with ½ cup of the sugar. Mix thoroughly and set aside.

4. Add calcium water to the pepper mixture, mix well, and return the mixture to a full boil over high heat. Slowly add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring constantly. Continue to stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve pectin while the jelly returns to a boil. After the pectin is fully dissolved, add the remaining quantity of sugar and stir to dissolve it. Once sugar is dissolved, and the jelly returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

5. Can Your Jelly: Remove jars from canner and ladle jelly into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, put on lids and screw bands, and tighten to fingertip tight. Lower filled jars into canner, ensuring jars are not touching each other and are covered with at least 1 to 2 inches of water. Place lid on canner, return to a rolling boil, and process for 10 minutes. (Add 1 extra minute of processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level). Turn off heat and allow canner to sit untouched for 5 minutes, then remove jars and allow to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Confirm that jars have sealed, then store properly.

TIP: Holy Hotness!
Habanero peppers are about as hot as they come, and getting even a little on your skin can be quite painful. Always wear gloves when working with them, do not let them come in contact with any part of your body (especially your eyes). Use common sense to keep safe and pain free!

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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