Winners of Our “June = Jam Time” Giveaway Are . . .

Featured

Brian and Kristina Lehmbeck of Ashburn, VA

who host the Mamma Rocks the Kitchen food blog

AND

Sharon Sciortino of Crystal Lake, IL

Congratulations to both!

Each will each receive a copy of Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin and a box of pectin from us; and a case of 4 fruited 8-oz jelly jars and lids and one plastic iLid from Fillmore Container.

Consolation Prize

Savory Spiced-Mango ConserveFor those of us who didn’t win, here’s a recipe from Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin by Allison Carroll Duffy: Savory Spiced-Mango Conserve.

Allison says: “If you’re a fan of chutney, give this conserve a try! Inspired by the classic Indian condiment, this conserve melds the sweetness of mangoes with the earthy, complex flavors of garlic, ginger, and a variety of other spices.”

Mangos are a versatile tropical fruit. The mangos sold in the U.S. are mostly grown in Mexico, Central Amereica, and South America and are available almost year-round in the U.S. because they have different ripening seasons. For good information about mango availability and additional healthy recipes, visit Mango.org by clicking here.

Also, if you like Giveaways, we will be running another one for Pomona’s Day in mid-August. If you already receive Jam Notes, you’ll be one of the first to know about it. If not, click here to sign up for Jam Notes, our e-newsletter.

And now for a little bit more about our winners.

Brian and Kristina:

“Thank you for this fantastic news. We have a relatively new food blog website, Mamma Rocks the Kitchen, just getting out there on Pinterest, Foodgawker and the like but are excited to try new recipes and products and write about them.

Strawberry-Banana Jam on Toast

Strawberry-Banana Jam on Toast

“We are new to jam making. Kristina is excited to make strawberry jam and wants to bring our followers along for the ride on our maiden voyage by demonstrating the process.

“We have been customers of Fillmore Container for a while now, which is how I got the email regarding this contest. We use mason jars and different container types for our food pictures and for storing a number of our recipes.”

From Pomona’s Pectin: Good luck with your blog and we’ll watch for your post on Strawberry Jam! Looking for a unique Strawberry Jam recipe? Check out Allison Carroll Duffy’s recipe for Strawberry-Banana Jama definite kid favorite.

Sharon says:

“OMG I’m SO excited! I heard about Pomona’s Pectin thru Fillmore Container while looking for canning jars and lids. I signed up for their emails, which introduced me to Pomona’s.

“I have been canning tomatoes and other vegetables for years and always enjoy both the product and the project.

Jam in jars

Maple-Vanilla-Peach Jam — Photo by Andrea Sheaffer

“I am new to making jams and jellies and am very excited to try my hand at it. I have had plenty of homemade jams, and even helped my gramma make it when I was younger, but this year will be my first personal attempt and I can’t wait!

“Thank you so much for my prize. Now I have no excuse to not give it a whirl!”

From Pomona’s Pectin: Allison Carroll Duffy’s Maple-Vanilla-Peach Jam is an addictive first-jamming recipe.

CanningCraft Creates: Strawberry Prosecco Jelly

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

With the solstice right around the corner, and summer weather upon us, local strawberries have finally made their long-awaited appearance!

And what better way to celebrate these luscious berries and the arrival of long, warm summer evenings than with some chilled prosecco? A glass of this refreshing, sparkling wine topped off with a couple of fresh berries is truly delicious. And guess what . . . this same combination also makes an excellent jelly!

Fresh, local strawberries are best, as they’ll likely be your sweetest, juiciest option. You can certainly use berries from the grocery store if that’s what’s available, but keep in mind that grocery store berries are often under-ripe, so they tend to yield somewhat less juice. You may need to increase slightly the quantity of berries you purchase if you’re going the grocery store route.

strawberries and prosecco on picnic table

 

This jelly is a perfect way to celebrate the arrival of summer. It’s light and refreshing, and its color is a gorgeous, sparkling red – perfect slathered on a warm croissant or scone, for a delightful breakfast treat!

Strawberry Prosecco Jelly

Strawberry Prosecco Jelly is a low-sugar cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Strawberry Prosecco Jelly Ingredients

3 pounds strawberries (this is about 3 level quarts)
½ cup water
1 cup prosecco
¼ cup lemon juice
4 teaspoons calcium water
1 cup sugar
4 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Strawberry Prosecco Jelly Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Rinse the strawberries and remove the stems. Then, combine strawberries and the ½ cup water in a sauce pan. Put a lid on the pan and bring it to a boil over high heat. Then reduce heat and simmer, stirring frequently and mashing as you go, until the berries are soft and have released their juices – about 2 to 4 minutes.

3. Remove pan from heat and thoroughly mash the berries. (A potato masher works well for this.)

4. Transfer mashed berries into a jelly bag. (If you don’t have a jelly bag, an impromptu bag made from layers of cheesecloth wrapped around the mashed fruit and gathered at the top works equally well,) Suspend the jelly bag over a large bowl and allow the mashed fruit to drip juice into the bowl until you have accumulated at least 3 cups of strawberry juice. This will likely take 2 to 4 hours. After you have accumulated the necessary 3 cups of juice, you can discard the berry pulp, or use it for something else.

strawberry juice dripping

5. Measure out 3 cups of the strawberry juice. (If you have any juice left over, you can use it for something else.) Pour the measured quantity of strawberry juice into a sauce pan. Add prosecco, calcium water, and lemon juice, then stir to combine.

6. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and the pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

7. Put the sauce pan on the stove and bring the strawberry mixture up to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return the jelly to a boil, then remove from heat.

8. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jelly, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

9. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

10. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

11. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

jars of strawberry prosecco jelly

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Printable copy of the Strawberry Prosecco Jelly recipe only here.

June = Jam Time = Pomona’s Giveaway!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

We will choose 2 winners; each will receive 3 prizes.

 

From Pomona’s: Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin, by Allison Carroll Duffy

book cover Preserving with Pomona's Pectin

From Pomona’s: A box of Pomona’s Pectin

box of Pomona's Pectin

From our friends at Fillmore Container: 1 pack of four 8 oz fruited jam jars with metal lids and rings and winner’s choice of color for one plastic iLID for an open jar.

Ball_8_oz_fruited jam jar

GIVEAWAY DETAILS

This Giveaway is open to residents of the U.S. and Canada, 18 years and older. Everyone gets 2 free entries; additional entries are also possible.

The entry dates are from June 15 through June 22, 2016.

Winners will be randomly chosen. We will email the winners to send us their mailing address, and they will have 48 hours to respond or we will choose new winners. The names of the winners will be posted on this Pomona’s Pectin website blog and on our Facebook Page as soon as possible after the giveaway ends.

Enter the Giveaway using the Rafflecopter widget above. If you’ve never entered a Rafflecopter giveaway, click here for a video of how it works.

Leaving a comment on this blog post does not enter you into the Giveaway. But we do love your comments if you care to make one.

This Giveaway is also being hosted on:

Fillmore Container’s blog

Allison Carroll Duffy’s CanningCraft blog

The Quarto Cooks blog

I watched your video first before I started jamming. . . .

Hello,
From someone who has been jamming for decades, I was so pleased to discover your pectin. I was always curious why I still needed 4 cups of sugar for SureJell’s low sugar pectin. 4 cups?? Really??

I have lots of fresh frozen fruit in the freezer for jam making. Today I tried your pectin on 1 single batch and 1 double batch of wild black raspberries. Success!!! And I only used less than a cup of sugar per batch (double for the double batch).

I watched your video first before I started jamming. I found it very interesting that your pectin is based on calcium vs. sugar. I learned a lot from your website. Thanks for a great product. Wish I had found you sooner.

Tina Rengel
Antioch, Ill
April 30, 2016

Jam Notes: Got Rhubarb? Get Recipes!

April 2016

CanningCraft Creates: Savory Rhubarb Conserve

By Allison Carroll Duffy, Author of Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin (Fair Winds Press, June 2013)

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

Rhubarb is one of the first perennial edibles to push its way up through the soggy spring soil around here. So each year the first sight of it is a welcome treat. At the moment, it’s still pretty cold and rainy on the Maine coast, and fresh rhubarb is a ways off.

But, anxious for spring as I am, rhubarb has definitely been on my brain. Fortunately, I managed to find some from last year in the bottom of my chest freezer. Rhubarb freezes beautifully, and it doesn’t require much prep, so I try to freeze some extra every year.

Whether you’re preparing rhubarb for the freezer, or to use right away, the first and most important thing to do is discard the leaves; the leaves are poisonous. Then wash the stalks and cut them up whatever way you like – I usually chop the stalks into medium-sized chunks.

Ian trimming rhubarb

Allison’s son Ian trimming leaves from rhubarb

Read Allison’s complete blog post & recipe, CanningCraft Creates: Savory Rhubarb Conserve, here.

Find the recipe only for Savory Rhubarb Conserve here.

More New Recipes

(Click on the picture or the recipe title to go to the recipe on our website.)

Rhubarb Jelly

rhubarb plant

 

Violet Jelly

Jar of Violet Jelly

Photo by Diane Rhoads

 

Strawberry-Lemon Marmalade

strawberry-lemon marmalade on toast

 

Orange-Chocolate Marmalade

2 jars of Orange-Chocolate Marmalade

 

Spruce Tip Jelly

jars of spruce tip jelly

Photo from Aube Giroux’s blog on Kitchen Vignettes

 

Blubarb Jam

Our good friend Mel Fitzpatrick from Hobart in Tasmania, Australia, made the Blubarb Jam from Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin (click the title or the picture for the recipe on our website), substituting 5/8 cup of maple syrup for the 1 1/4 cups of sugar in the recipe. She and her brunch guests loved it — “perfect with the tart rhubarb.” Thanks for sending the beautiful picture, Mel.

Blubarb Jam

 

The Jam (S)Pot

Puts the Spotlight on a Pomona’s Jam Maker

Turkey Foot Farm on Growing and Making

Kathryn (Kat) Crawley

Kathryn (Kat) Crawley

 

Pomona’s News

You may be seeing a rise in price for Pomona’s Pectin later in the season. We try very hard to keep Pomona’s affordable. We haven’t had a price increase since 2013. Unfortunately this year we are facing a steep increase in the cost of the pectin to us and have been forced to raise our prices. In addition to citrus peel shortages (for a variety of reasons), citrus pectin is in great demand across the global marketplace.

We hope you will remember that when you buy Pomona’s Pectin, you are buying premium, “top of the line” pectin — no preservatives, no dextrose, no additives of any kind, non-GMO, and vegan. There’s nothing else out there quite like it! We thank you for your support — and Happy Jamming!

Buy Pomona’s Pectin on our website now or use our Store Locator to find your closest store. Prepare for preserving season and beat the price increase!

Comments & Feedback always welcome. Email us: info@pomonapectin.com.

See the Complete, Original Jam Notes with additional Pomona’s News here.

Scroll to the bottom of the original Jam Notes for Pomona’s News.

 

CanningCraft Creates: Savory Rhubarb Conserve

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

Rhubarb is one of the first perennial edibles to push its way up through the soggy spring soil around here. So each year the first sight of it is a welcome treat. At the moment, it’s still pretty cold and rainy on the Maine coast, and fresh rhubarb is a ways off.

But, anxious for spring as I am, rhubarb has definitely been on my brain. Fortunately, I managed to find some from last year in the bottom of my chest freezer. Rhubarb freezes beautifully, and it doesn’t require much prep, so I try to freeze some extra every year.

Whether you’re preparing rhubarb for the freezer, or to use right away, the first and most important thing to do is discard the leaves; the leaves are poisonous. Then wash the stalks and cut them up whatever way you like – I usually chop the stalks into medium-sized chunks.

Ian trimming rhubarb

Allison’s son Ian trimming leaves from rhubarb

Your rhubarb is now ready to cook. Or, you can simply pop it as-is into a freezer-safe container and freeze it for later. Who knows when you might have a hankering for rhubarb, right?

This rhubarb conserve is a savory one – sweet, sour, spicy, and a little bit pungent, all at the same time. It’s like a chutney, really, and I use it in the same way. It’s great as an accompaniment to spicy Indian food, but it’s equally good alongside not-so-spicy fare, such as roasted pork or chicken.

Without a doubt, though, my favorite way to enjoy it is with a slice of sharp cheddar cheese on a hearty wheat cracker or slice of crusty baguette.

Savory Rhubarb Conserve

Enjoy . . . and Happy Spring!

Savory Rhubarb Conserve

Savory Rhubarb Conserve is a savory, low-sugar cooked conserve made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Savory Rhubarb Conserve Ingredients

1¾ pounds trimmed rhubarb stalks
1 cup diced onion
½ cup golden raisins (or regular raisins, if you prefer)
1 cup apple cider vinegar
½ cup freshly squeezed orange juice
1 Tablespoon orange zest
2 Tablespoons finely minced ginger root
1 teaspoon whole mustard seed
1 teaspoon ground allspice
1 teaspoon ground cardamom
1 teaspoon ground cloves
½ teaspoon ground coriander
½ teaspoon ground turmeric
½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon black pepper
2 teaspoons calcium water
2½ cups sugar (divided)
2 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Savory Rhubarb Conserve Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Rinse the rhubarb stalks. Slice the stalks lengthwise in to strips, then dice.

trimmed rhubarb stalks

Trimmed rhubarb stalks, ready to rinse

 

3. In a large sauce pan, combine diced rhubarb, diced onion, raisins, vinegar, orange juice, orange zest, minced ginger root, mustard seed, allspice, cardamom, cloves, coriander, turmeric, salt, and black pepper. Put a lid on the pan and bring mixture to a boil over high heat. Then reduce heat and simmer, still covered, for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.

4. Remove the sauce pan from the heat. Transfer the mixture into a bowl or other heat-proof container, then measure out 4 cups of the mixture. (If you have any left over, you can use it for something else.) Pour the measured quantity of the mixture back into the sauce pan. Add the calcium water and stir to combine.

5. Measure 1 cup sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

6. Put the sauce pan on the stove and bring the rhubarb mixture up to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve the pectin.

7. Add remaining 1½ cups sugar once pectin is dissolved. Stir well and return to a boil. Once the conserve returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

8. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with conserve, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

9. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

10. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

11. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Printable copy of the Savory Rhubarb Conserve recipe only here.

The Jam (S)Pot: Farm to Table — Creating Value with Making

Kathryn (Kat) Crawley

Kathryn (Kat) Crawley

Kathryn (Kat) Crawley and her husband Ken are fairly new to farming, but they have jumped right in and found great success with both growing and making on Turkey Foot Farm in Cataldo, Idaho.

Kat says, “We reside on top of a pristine mountain in the northeastern panhandle of Idaho. There has never been farming in the area so there has been no pesticide use. What we grow is enhanced by the bees that we keep. For that reason, we cannot and will not ever use anything considered harmful to them or the environment.”

In addition to bee-keeping, the Crawleys grow a wide variety of fruits and vegetables as well as raise chickens and catfish; and both animals participate in their soil fertilization.

jars of honey

Kat and Ken have been working on value-added products for about 2 years now. In addition to selling their honey, they use honey by-products to make salves, soaps, lip treatments, and lotions. They make sourdough breads from the non-GMO grains they grow and grind themselves, which they will sell with their low-sweetener jams and jellies at their farmer’s market stand.

Kat’s twin brother is diabetic, so she grew up eating no sugar and low sugar foods and found the aftertaste from sugar substitutes to be awful. So she was thrilled when her husband discovered Pomona’s Pectin in 2010. She says, “I made my first batch of blueberry jam with Pomona’s and from that point, I was sold! I have been using it ever since.”

jars of preserves

Kat’s Creative Process

According to Kat, her creativity with making comes from experience over the years in various food industries, especially with individuals who shared their secrets. She also watched cooking shows and wrote down key food preparation concepts.

She explains, “I have learned that using fresh ingredients, herbs, and spices makes something taste completely different . . . Continue Reading Here.

Kat’s Advice for Getting Started Making Farm to Table Products

First, Kat says, “Do your homework; research the internet. Talk to people who are already doing it. Get pricing on all the ingredients you will be using in your value-added products. Contact your local health department . . . Continue Reading Here.

One pound bag of Pomona's Pectin

One pound bag of Pomona’s Pectin

At Pomona’s, we say: If you want to make jam or jelly to sell, consider Pomona’s Universal Pectin. Besides giving you the ability to make healthier, lower sugar products, Pomona’s is available to jam manufacturers at wholesale prices, starting with a 1 pound bag that can make up to 320 half-pint jars of jam. Pomona’s jells reliably and keeps indefinitely – so you have nothing to lose by trying it. Visit the Wholesale page of the Pomona’s website or call 413-772-6816.

The Jam (S)Pot: Turkey Foot Farm on Making Farm to Table Products

Kathryn (Kat) Crawley

Kathryn (Kat) Crawley

Kathryn (Kat) Crawley owner and maker at Turkey Foot Farm in Cataldo, Idaho, has some tips on getting started with Farm to Table products.

First, Kat says, “Do your homework; research the internet. Talk to people who are already doing it. Get pricing on all the ingredients you will be using in your value-added products. Contact your local health department to make sure that you have all of your licensure in order. Get your re-seller’s permit and, if necessary, get a business license so that you can purchase your products tax-free.

“Determine where you are going to sell your products because that will affect how they are to be prepared. If you have recipes that you are looking to create, create them. Then have your friends, family, and other acquaintances sample your products – a family member or a friend is going to be honest. Be prepared for constructive criticism; it will save you a lot of heartache and having a table full of products that don’t sell.

“Keep track of all your ingredients, prep time, and any other items as this will help you to determine pricing so that your products are competitive with like products. Don’t shortchange yourself. You have to be happy with what you charge and if it is good, you will have repeat customers.”

 

jar closeup whiskey salted caramel apple/pear butter

Whiskey Salted Caramel Apple/Pear Butter

 

And Kat’s final piece of advice: “Once you have in mind what you would like to prepare, start small. And if you plan to sell at a farmer’s market, use products grown by other farmer’s market vendors as well as your own. Support your community in achieving success for all. This creates community cohesion. It is all about creating an environment where everyone is part of the bigger picture. Just remember, for some, growing the items is their forte while there are others who can take what is grown and turn it into something that everyone can enjoy. To approach it from that viewpoint is a civil thing to do, and, besides, it is just good karma!”

One pound bag of Pomona's Pectin

One pound bag of Pomona’s Pectin

At Pomona’s, we say: If you want to make jam or jelly to sell, consider Pomona’s Universal Pectin. Besides giving you the ability to make healthier, lower sugar products, Pomona’s is available to jam manufacturers at wholesale prices, starting with a 1 pound bag that can make up to 320 half-pint jars of jam. Pomona’s jells reliably and keeps indefinitely – so you have nothing to lose by trying it. Visit the Wholesale page of the Pomona’s website or call 413-772-6816.

Read More About Turkey Foot Farm Here.

Read Kat’s Tips on Her Creative Process Here.

The Jam (S)Pot: Turkey Foot Farm Shares Tips on Creative Process

Kathryn (Kat) Crawley

Kathryn (Kat) Crawley

According to Kat Crawley owner and maker at Turkey Foot Farm in Cataldo, Idaho, her creativity with making comes from experience over the years in various food industries, especially with individuals who shared their secrets. She also watched cooking shows and wrote down key food preparation concepts.

She explains, “I have learned that using fresh ingredients, herbs, and spices makes something taste completely different than using things that come out of a box. I strive hard to taste and re-taste until I am satisfied that it is exactly right.”

Her true inspiration is to prepare what is native and grown on her farm. One of her most popular items is Salted Caramel Apple Butter. She also likes to use infusions of liquor because “it truly enhances the fruit flavors in a way that using sugar does not. Most of my products are very low sugar because I want to create things that everyone can use and that are healthier.”

jars of jam

Kat says, “Adding salt to the mix is a critical ingredient. Salt brings the fruit flavors to the surface and can change the flavor in ways that then may cause you to add or not add something else.”

“Start with the basics and stick to what is complimentary. Trial and error are going to be your best teachers. Start with small batches, write it down, and if it works, then you can make a bigger batch.”

Read about Turkey Foot Farm Here.

Read Kat’s Advice for Getting Started Making Farm to Table Products Here.

I found your book at the library and loved it so much I bought 4 copies . . .

Greetings:
I made the Blueberry-Rhubarb Jam this past winter with frozen fruit. It was delicious!! I found your book, Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin, at the library and loved it so much I bought 4 copies: one for each of my two daughters-in-law, one copy for a friend of my son’s best friend, and one copy for myself! Each one will receive the book for their birthday accompanied by canning jars and Pomona’s Pectin!! I have used Pomona’s Pectin for years and would never, ever use anything else. Thank you.

Donna Mansolillo
Foster, Rhode Island
March 20, 2016

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