CanningCraft Creates: Black Tea Jelly

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picture of Allison Carroll DUffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

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Here’s Allison:

In the dark, cold, snowy days of February, a cup of hot tea is about the best pick-me-up I know. This is not news, of course . . . folks have been enjoying this warming beverage in various forms for a very long time. It's just that any time I sit down to enjoy a cup, taking a few brief moments to pause, breathe, and look out the window, I am reminded how wonderful and restorative something as simple as a cup of tea can be.

I really enjoy herbal teas, especially right before bed, but when it comes to an afternoon pick-me-up, I'm all about strong, black tea. So, when Mary Lou at Pomona's mentioned the idea of a tea jelly, that really got me thinking . . . since I love tea (and I'm guessing I'm not the only one), why not figure out more ways to enjoy it? So, here you have it – Black Tea Jelly.

When I was first working on this recipe, I thought that I might need to include some sort of fruit to make the jelly more interesting. But when I made a straight-ahead, plain black tea version, it quickly became clear that no fancy, extra ingredients were necessary. With nothing but tea, sugar, and lemon juice, this simple jelly is truly delicious.

Since there are few other ingredients to hide behind, the tea you use will make a difference. I used Irish Breakfast tea for this recipe, but most any variety of black tea is fine, as long as it's fresh and of good quality. Also, use loose leaf tea, not tea bags. Often tea that is in a bag is granular or powdery, as is some loose tea. You'll want to avoid any granular or powdery tea, and instead use loose leaf tea. The reason for this is simply that the strength of tea can vary quite a bit depending on how it was processed.

I created this recipe using loose leaf tea, and so to end up with a jelly of the right tea flavor and strength, you'll want to use loose leaf tea as well. Also, even if you don't typically use lemon in your tea, be sure to use it in your tea jelly as called for, as lemon juice is important in making this jelly safe to can.

I have a half-full jar of this jelly in my refrigerator at the moment, and I have to admit that I've been enjoying it by the spoonful. It's delicious slathered on toast as well – for breakfast or an afternoon snack – alongside a cup of tea, of course.

Tea Jelly & Toast & TeaBlack Tea Jelly

Black Tea Jelly is a low-sugar cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Black Tea Jelly Ingredients

6 Tablespoons loose black tea leaves
4¼ cups boiling water
¼ cup lemon juice
4½ teaspoons calcium water
1 cup sugar
4½ teaspoons Pomona's Pectin powder

Black Tea Jelly Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Place the tea leaves in a heat-proof bowl, then pour the boiling water into the bowl. Allow tea to steep for 10 minutes. Then, pour the tea through a fine-mesh strainer or cheesecloth into another container, reserving the tea liquid, and discarding the tea leaves.

3. Measure out 4 cups of the tea. (If you don't have quite enough, just add a little bit more water.) Pour the measured amount of tea into a large sauce pan. Add the lemon juice and calcium water, then stir to combine.

4. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

5. Bring the tea mixture up to a rolling boil over high heat. Add sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return jelly to a boil, then remove from heat.

6. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jelly, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to "fingertip tight" (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

7. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

8. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

9. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then, confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and photo by Allison Carroll Duffy

Printable Copy of Black Tea Jelly recipe.

7 Helpful Hints

1. To stop foaming, add ½ teaspoon butter per 4 cup batch.

2. Taste test for sweetness after pectin is dissolved in mixture. Not sweet enough? Add more sweetener. Stir 1 minute at full boil.

3. The pectin can only dissolve properly in a low-sweetener mixture. For higher sweetener recipes, stir pectin into low sweetener (no more than ½ the amount of mashed fruit or juice for sugar and no more than ¼ the amount of mashed fruit or juice for honey or other liquid sweeteners); add remaining sweetener after pectin is dissolved.

4. If, after jars are sealed, you discover you need to add sweetener, lemon juice, calcium water, fruit, or juice, you can empty jars into a pan with new ingredients. Bring mixture to a full boil, stir well 1 minute and re-can.

5. Pectin jells when thoroughly cool. If your jam or jelly doesn’t jell well, you have to know why before you can fix it. Just adding more pectin may not solve the problem.

6. Color changes over time do not affect flavor or quality.

7. For a softer jell, use less pectin.

8. Cannot be safely sealed with paraffin.

All -Fruit Cherry-Peach Jam

AllFruitCherryPeachJamExcerpted from Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin by Allison Carroll Duffy (Fair Winds Press, June 2013)

Allison says:  "Cherries and peaches are so naturally sweet that they’re especially suitable for an all-fruit jam. For the sweetest, most delicious jam, select peaches and cherries that are at peak ripeness, and be sure to choose a sweet cherry variety—Bing cherries are a good option. This jam is so intensely fruity that you’ll be hard-pressed not to eat it by the spoonful right out of the jar. It’s also delicious swirled into a bowl of yogurt."

Yield: 4 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

All-Fruit Cherry-Peach Jam Ingredients

1 pound fully ripe peaches
1 pound sweet cherries
1/4 cup lemon juice
4 teaspoons calcium water
1 cup unsweetened apple juice concentrate
3 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

All-Fruit Cherry-Peach Jam Directions

1. Wash your jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring canner to a rolling boil, and boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize them. (Add 1 extra minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.) Reduce heat and allow jars to remain in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan, heat to a low simmer, and hold until ready to use.

2. Peel and remove pits from peaches, and then mash the peaches in a large bowl. Set aside.

3. Rinse cherries, remove stems, slice in half and remove pits, and then chop the cherries—by hand with a chef’s knife or with a food processor.

4. Combine the mashed peaches and the chopped cherries and mix well. Measure 3 cups of the fruit mixture (saving any extra for another use), and combine the measured quantity in a saucepan with lemon juice and calcium water. Mix well.

5. In a separate pan, bring apple juice concentrate to a boil. Pour hot juice concentrate into a blender or food processor, and then add pectin powder. Vent the lid and blend for 1 to 2 minutes, stopping to scrape down sides with a rubber spatula as needed, until powder is thoroughly dissolved. Set aside.

6. Bring cherry-peach mixture to a full boil over high heat, and then slowly add the pectin–juice concentrate mixture, stirring constantly. Continue to cook and stir jam for 1 minute as the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

7. Can Your Jam: Remove jars from canner and ladle jam into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, put on lids and screw bands, and tighten to fingertip tight. Lower filled jars into canner, ensuring jars are not touching each other and are covered with at least 1 to 2 inches of water. Place lid on canner, return to a rolling boil, and process for 10 minutes. (Add 1 extra minute of processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level). Turn off heat and allow canner to sit untouched for 5 minutes, then remove jars and allow to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Confirm that jars have sealed, then store properly.

Customize It!
If you’re looking for something new, why not substitute some different fruits? In place of or in combination with the cherry and peach in this recipe, use pear, apricot, mango, fig, or sweet plum—or use a combination of any of these fruits.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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And the August Giveaway Winners Are . . .

Pomona full sizeTwo names were randomly chosen by Rafflecopter on the day after Pomona's Day.

We are happy to announce that Bernadette S. from Houston, TX, and Sarah C. from San Mateo, CA, will each be the recipient from Pomona's Pectin of a copy of Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin and a box of Pomona's Pectin; and from Fillmore Container a case of 6 Orchard Road Jelly Jars, lids, and bands, and a stainless steel funnel.

Bernadette says: "I have been using Pomona's Pectin to make vegan cheese since October 2012, when I read about it in a blog post (Vedgedout.com). I have had consistently good results using Pomona's Pectin, with no set-up issues.

"This led me to use it in jam making, also with consistently good results. I stick to simple recipes since that is what I enjoy eating: strawberry, blueberry, peach, grape, orange. I peruse your website for ideas and tips, and follow you on social media.

"Fillmore Container was new to me until I read about them via the link on your site. Looking forward to trying their products.

"Upon receiving my gifts, I plan to make Pepper Jack Cheese, try Watermelon Jelly again and, once citrus is in season here in southeast Texas, beginning late fall/early winter, try a cranberry orange preserve, since those fruits go so well together. Maybe a blood orange jam. (Note from Pomona's: For Bernadette and the rest of us who didn't win, we have now added Watermelon Jelly and Watermelon Jam recipes to our website!)

"Also I will share Pomona's Pectin info at our monthly vegan potluck since people are looking for ways to make vegan eating easy and good. Again, thank you."

Gratefully, graciously, gracefully,
B

And Sarah says:  "I've only canned jam a handful of times. I heard about Pomona's soon after my first time, when I used traditional pectin. I wish I could remember exactly where, I think it was on a blog, and then I saw it in Williams Sonoma.

"I'm interested in a low-added-sugar diet (only partially successfully achieved), so Pomona's, with its low sugar compatibility, seems like a great resource I haven't tried yet.

"I hadn't actually heard of Fillmore Container until I saw the giveaway posted. I don't actually own any specialty canning equipment except for a small assortment of jars.

"I'm not a huge jam-eater so for a while I was doing an occasional splurge on artisan jam from my local Farmers' Market. I love cooking though, and canning/jamming seems to be an exciting new field for my experimentation.

"I'm really looking forward to reading Preserving with Pomona's Pectin and trying out the pectin and jars and funnel. Thank you so much!!"

Best,
Sarah

Our congratulations to both Bernadette and Sarah and thank you to everyone who participated. That’s all for now, but stay tuned, we may try this again!

Any Kind of Jam & Oatmeal Bars

Recipe created and contributed by Becky Hoff, who says: "This recipe would work well with any kind of jam. One-and-a-half cups (12 ounces) of jam seems to be just the right amount."

Any Kind of Jam & Oatmeal Bar Ingredients

1 cup (16 Tablespoons) room temperature unsalted butter
1 cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 ½ cups oats
1 ½ cups all purpose flour
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon baking soda
1 ½ cups (12 ounces) jam of your choice

Any Kind of Jam & Oatmeal Bar Directions

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

2. Cream butter, sugar, and vanilla until fluffy.

3. Whisk together dry ingredients (not the jam), then mix them into butter mixture. This will resemble a slightly dry cookie dough.

4. Press 2/3 of the mixture into a greased 9" x 13" pan. Spread jam over the top, then crumble remaining dough over the jam layer.

5. Bake at 400 degrees F for 20 to 25 minutes, until brown on top. Cool on a rack, cut into bars, and serve.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Apple Pie Filling — For Canning

apple pie -apples-A

This recipe is adapted from recipes contributed to us by Geneva Mock and Ashley Baugh. 

Yield: two pint jars, which is enough for one 9″ pie. To make more than that, multiply all ingredients by the number of jars you intend to make. If you are making more than two pints, be sure you use a sauce pan large enough to hold all the apple slices and bring them to a boil.

Ingredients – Apple Pie Filling

5 cups apple slices
½ cup up to ¾ cup sugar (could be a combination of white and brown sugars) or ¼ cup up to ½ cup honey (I used ¼ cup honey with Gravenstein apples, which gave a perfect sweetness.)
1 teaspoon Pomona's Pectin powder
3 Tablespoons water (up to 1/2 cup if apples aren't very juicy)
3 Tablespoons lemon juice
1 teaspoon calcium water
¼ teaspoon nutmeg
½ teaspoon cinnamon

Directions -- Apple Pie Filling

1. Prepare 5 cups of apple slices. Set aside.

2. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

3. Measure apple slices, water, lemon juice, calcium water, and spices into a saucepan. Bring to a boil and boil gently for several minutes until apple slices are thoroughly heated.

4. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring gently for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve pectin while the mixture comes back up to a boil. Once the mixture returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

5. Funnel into clean, hot pint jars, leaving 1” of headspace. Wipe the rims, put on hot lids, tighten the rings to finger-tip tight, place in boiling water-bath canner, and boil for 15 minutes at sea level. Add 1 minute more for every 1,000 feet above sea level. Remove jars from canner and set on counter to cool. When completely cool, check seals; lids should be sucked down. Use within 1 year.

Important Note About Processing Time: The USDA and the National Center for Home Food Preservation have not yet established a safe processing time for quart jars of pie filling made with pectin. That is why we say to can this pie filling in pint jars. 

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Apple Pie Jam

Apples_on_tree_2011_G1 (1)Apple Pie Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Apple Pie Jam Ingredients

3 to 4 pound of apples (9 to 12 medium apples)
¼ cup up to ½ cup water

Peel, core, and chop apples and put in a sauce pan with the water. Bring to a simmer and simmer covered, stirring and mashing occasionally, until you have chunky or smooth apple sauce. Remove from heat and measure out 4 cups of apple sauce.

Make Jam with:
4 cups of cooked apple sauce
2 tsp calcium water
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp allspice
½ cup honey or maple syrup or ¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
2 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Apple Pie Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Put measured amount of apple sauce into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water, lemon juice, and spices, and mix well.

4. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Option: Feel free to use whatever spice mix you would normally use to make apple pie. Spices should not exceed 1 teaspoon.

If you leave out all of the spices, you will have plain apple jam, delicious in its own right.

Apple Photo credit: By George Chernilevsky (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

Print

Apple-Rosemary Jelly

Apples by Steenbergs

Apple Harvest by Steenbergs

Apple-Rosemary Jelly is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Apple-Rosemary Jelly Ingredients

4 cups apple cider or apple juice
4 teaspoons dried rosemary

Make strained cider/juice: Bring above ingredients to a boil then turn off heat and steep for 30 minutes. Strain out the rosemary.

Make Apple-Rosemary Jelly with:
4 cups strained cider/juice
2 teaspoons calcium water
4 Tablespoons apple cider vinegar
½ cup honey or 1 cup sugar
4 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Apple-Rosemary Jelly Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure strained cider/juice into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and apple cider vinegar and stir well.

4. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

 

Apple Harvest Photo by Steenbergs on Flickr, Creative Commons License

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

Print

Apricot-Pineapple Jam

Apricot-Pineapple Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Apricot-Pineapple Jam Ingredients

3 cups washed, finely chopped, and mashed apricots
1 cup crushed pineapple (canned in its own juice, but don’t include the juice)
¼ cup lemon juice
4 teaspoons calcium water
½ cup up to 1 cup honey or ¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Apricot-Pineapple Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small saucepan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Prepare fruit.

3. Measure fruit into saucepan.

4. Add calcium water and lemon juice and mix well.

5. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

6. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

7. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Option: Feel free to vary the fruit ratio with more pineapple and less apricot. Just be sure to keep the total quantity of mixed fruit at 4 cups per the rest of the recipe ingredients.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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August “Give Away” Winners & Blubarb Jam Recipe

blubarbjamTwo names were randomly chosen by Rafflecopter on Thursday, August 22. We are happy to announce that Lynn Lackoff and Sandy H. will each be the recipients of one copy of Preserving with Pomona's Pectin and one box of Pomona's Pectin.

Lynn is from Maine and says, "I had stopped making jam and preserves after my preserves were either much too sweet or too runny as I tried to use less sweetener. My family was kind as we spooned peach jam onto our toast, but I was not happy to have such poor results -- especially after skinning many, many small peaches!

"Then I discovered Pomona's at our local natural food store and, although I was skeptical of being able to successfully use less sugar -- or honey or juice -- I decided to give it a try. This spring I turned our bumper crop of rhubarb into strawberry rhubarb jam made with honey - it jelled perfectly and tasted fruity rather than sugary! The directions with the box were very clear and I felt as though I could easily contact you if I had any questions.

"We just picked this year's peaches off our tree this morning - small peaches but numerous and tasty. Can't wait to have delicious peach jam to eat and give away. It's wild Maine blueberry season right now - I feel an urge to make some blueberry maple jam. Thank you for your great product!

"And of course I can't wait to check out all of the recipes in the book!!"

Sandy is from Missouri. She says, "This will be my first time trying Pomona Pectin and I'm very excited to have this opportunity! I make a lot of jam and am currently making jam out of lots of cherries I was blessed with :) I think I will use the pectin to make a yummy Cherry Vanilla Bean Jam! Or maybe a Spiced Caramel Pear Jam (one of my favorites), and then there's always my son's favorite, Strawberry Ginger Ale Jam! Whichever one I make, I will be so thankful to be able to use Pomona Pectin! Thank you so much for choosing my name and giving me the opportunity to try Pomona!"

Our congratulations to both Lynn and Sandy.

For the rest of us, here is another recipe from the book -- a great combination if you have some rhubarb stashed in your freezer. This recipe was adapted from one by Kirsten Jennings, which she contributed for the book.

Blubarb Jam

We will give away 2 more copies of the book together with a box of pectin in September. We'll announce it in the September Jam Noteson the website, on our Facebook page, and on Twitter. Stay tuned.

August 2014 — Giveaway to Celebrate Pomona’s Day! Scroll Down to See Winners . . .

Pomona full size

Pomona, our namesake, was the Roman goddess of fruitful abundance. Her name comes from the Latin word pomum, "fruit," specifically orchard fruit. Pomona watches over and protects fruit trees and cares for their cultivation. Her festival day is August 13.

In her honor, Pomona's Pectin and Fillmore Container have put together a gift pack for 2 lucky winners. Each winner will receive --

From us:
~ A copy of Preserving with Pomona's Pectin by Allison Carroll Duffy (75 inspiring low-sugar jam, jelly, preserve, conserve, and marmalade recipes)
~ A box of Pomona's Pectin.

Preserving with Pomona Pectin cover

 

From Fillmore Container:
One case of Orchard Road regular mouth 8-oz jelly jars (6 jars)
~ One pack of Orchard Road regular mouth lids and bands (6 per pack)
~ One regular mouth stainless funnel

Orchard Road jars & funnel

Orchard Road jars & funnel

Also in the spirit of celebration, we are sharing with you the recipe for Gingered Lemon-Fig Preserves from Preserving with Pomona's Pectin (see below for the recipe).

This Giveaway is open to anyone with a mailing address in the U.S. or Canada who is 18 years or older. The entry dates are from August 5 through August 13, 2014 (Pacific Daylight Time).

There is nothing special you need to do to enter the Giveaway. Everyone gets 2 free entries.

If you've never entered a Rafflecopter Giveaway, click here for a video and diagram of how it works.

Leaving a comment on this blog post does not enter you into the Giveaway, but of course we always love to get your comments!

Winners will be randomly chosen. We will email the winners to send us their mailing address. The names of the winners will be posted on the Pomona's Pectin website blog 48 hours after the giveaway ends.

Enter the Giveaway using the box below.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Get the Gingered Lemon-Fig Preserves recipe.

Gingered Lemon-Fig Preserves from "Preserving with Pomona's Pectin" by Allison Carroll Duffy.

Gingered Lemon-Fig Preserves from "Preserving with Pomona's Pectin" by Allison Carroll Duffy.

 

Read Allison's August 2014 guest blog post and brand new recipe for Seedless Raspberry-Honey-Vanilla Jam.

Visit Fillmore Container's website. They are a purveyor of all kinds of containers & closures, canning accessories, party supplies, and candle supplies. They also sell Pomona's Pectin!

Baked Brie Appetizer

Chris Wilson of LunaGrown Fine Gourmet Jam shares another way to use up those last bits of jam -- great to bring to a potluck.

Baked Brie Ingredients

1 sheet frozen puff pastry, thawed
1 (8 ounce) round Brie cheese
1/3 cup raspberry jam (or whatever your favorite is)
2 Tablespoons chopped walnuts

BAKED BRIE DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil and lightly grease with cooking spray. Lay the puff pastry onto the prepared baking sheet. Center the Brie wheel onto the pastry. Spread the jam evenly over the top of the Brie. Sprinkle the walnuts atop the jam. Fold the puff pastry over the top of the Brie, sealing all openings. Bake in preheated oven until the pastry is golden brown, about 20 minutes.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Berry Blitz Jam

Berry Blitz Jam is a low-sugar cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin.
Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

From the kitchen of Charlotte Levy, The Seasonal Gourmet, a Pomona’s jam maker in Southern California who sells her jams at the Farmers Market in Ramona.

Yield: 7 to 8 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Berry Blitz Jam Ingredients

5 cups mashed mixed berries (I use raspberries, strawberries, blueberries and just a touch of blackberries)
5 teaspoons calcium water
5 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 ½ cups sugar
3 ¾ to 4 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Berry Blitz Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Combine measured fruit in a Dutch oven or heavy, deep sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and lemon juice, and mix well.

4. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil over medium heat, stirring constantly. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, time for 1 minute and remove it from the heat. Stir for a couple of minutes and skim foam (if desired).

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Charlotte says: Great on toast, pancakes, waffles, etc. Enjoy!

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Berry Lemonade

Chris Wilson of LunaGrown Fine Gourmet Jam says: “I enjoy this with my leftover jams for a special summer drink…. A bit different every time.”

BERRY LEMONADE INGREDIENTS

Juice of 4 lemons
1/2 cup sugar, or to taste
1 quart of water
Assorted berry flavor jams

BERRY LEMONADE DIRECTIONS

Juice lemons and run through a fine mesh sieve to remove any seeds. Add sugar and water and stir to combine. Chill completely. To serve put 1 tbsp. jam into each glass (I used raspberry and blackberry). Fill with ice and pour lemonade over the top. Add a swizzle stick for stirring and a lemon slice to garnish.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Black Tea Jelly

Tea Jelly & Toast & TeaBlack Tea Jelly is a low-sugar cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy. This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin.

Allison says:  Since there are few other ingredients to hide behind, the tea you use will make a difference. I used Irish Breakfast tea for this recipe, but most any variety of black tea is fine, as long as it's fresh and of good quality. Also, use loose leaf tea, not tea bags. Often tea that is in a bag is granular or powdery, as is some loose tea. You'll want to avoid any granular or powdery tea, and instead use loose leaf tea. The reason for this is simply that the strength of tea can vary quite a bit depending on how it was processed.

Also, even if you don't typically use lemon in your tea, be sure to use it in your tea jelly as called for, as lemon juice is important in making this jelly safe to can.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Black Tea Jelly Ingredients

6 Tablespoons loose black tea leaves
4¼ cups boiling water
¼ cup lemon juice
4½ teaspoons calcium water
1 cup sugar
4½ teaspoons Pomona's Pectin powder

Black Tea Jelly Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Place the tea leaves in a heat-proof bowl, then pour the boiling water into the bowl. Allow tea to steep for 10 minutes. Then, pour the tea through a fine-mesh strainer or cheesecloth into another container, reserving the tea liquid, and discarding the tea leaves.

3. Measure out 4 cups of the tea. (If you don't have quite enough, just add a little bit more water.) Pour the measured amount of tea into a large sauce pan. Add the lemon juice and calcium water, then stir to combine.

4. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

5. Bring the tea mixture up to a rolling boil over high heat. Add sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return jelly to a boil, then remove from heat.

6. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jelly, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to "fingertip tight" (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

7. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

8. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

9. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then, confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and photo by Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison’s complete blog post on Black Tea Jelly.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Blackberry Port Jam

Photo by Mia Valcarcel

Photo by Mia Valcarcel

Blackberry Port Jam is a low-sugar cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

This recipe was adapted from Better Homes & Gardens Special Interest Publication Canning Magazine by Mia Valcarcel, who wanted to make it with Pomona's Pectin.

Yield: about 4 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Blackberry Port Jam Ingredients

2 cups mashed blackberries (about 4 cups whole berries)
1 ½ teaspoons calcium water
1 cup port wine
2 tablespoons lemon juice
½ cup sugar
1 ½ teaspoons Pomona's Pectin powder
Additional sugar if needed (depends on how tart your blackberries are)
¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon (optional, depends on your port flavors)

Blackberry Port Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure mashed blackberries into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water, port wine, and lemon juice, and mix well.

4. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat. Taste the mixture to see if you need to add more sugar. This will depend on how sweet or tart your blackberries are. If adding more sugar, turn the heat back on, stir well while mixture returns to a full boil, then remove from heat. Add cinnamon now if desired to help boost the flavors.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Note from Mia: The port I used is from a local Maryland vineyard and contained overtones of chocolate and raspberry. The original recipe called for cloves, but I used cinnamon instead. I think it boosted the flavors more than cloves would have.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Blissini Jelly

pomegranate seeds orangesBlissini Jelly, created and contributed by Mari Morgan, is a low-sugar cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Mari says: “Since this jelly is not season-dependent, being based on bottled juices (although one could certainly juice fresh oranges and pomegranates), it is a nice one to make in the winter for stocking stuffers. I had half a bottle of dry Prosecco left over, so I started looking up cocktails made with Prosecco to inspire a jelly. I found this cocktail called a Blissini, created by Food Network’s Giada de Laurentiis, that is simply equal parts pomegranate juice, orange juice, and Prosecco.

“The result was a beautiful, rosy-colored, sweet-tart jelly, not perfectly clear because the orange juice is still quite cloudy even after straining, but really quite pretty nonetheless, with a slightly mysterious flavor where you can’t quite identify exactly what it is but wow is it yummy. I slathered the pot ‘dregs’ onto a shortbread cookie and did a happy dance right in my kitchen!”

Yield: 5 to 6 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Blissini Jelly Ingredients

1-1/3 cups pomegranate juice (I used POM unsweetened)
1-1/3 cups orange juice (measured after straining out pulp through cheesecloth, even the so-called “pulp free” was still pretty pulpy)
1-1/3 cups dry Prosecco Italian sparkling wine (it’s okay if it’s flat)
1 Tablespoon lemon juice*
4 teaspoons calcium water
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 cup sugar
4 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

*You can use ¼ teaspoon citric acid powder stirred into 1 Tablespoon of water in place of lemon juice.

Blissini Jelly Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a simmer. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Combine pomegranate juice, orange juice, Prosecco, lemon juice, calcium water, and salt in a sauce pan. Mix well.

3. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

4. Bring juice mixture to a full boil. Whisk in sugar/pectin mixture and return to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring constantly. It will foam like mad. (You may add ½ teaspoon butter to help prevent foaming if you like.)

5. Remove from heat; let settle for a minute or two and skim off as much of the foam as you can. Save it for the cook’s share; it’s very tasty! Crank up the heat on the water bath pot.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Blubarb Jam

blubarbjamExcerpted from Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin by Allison Carroll Duffy (Fair Winds Press, June 2013)

Allison says: "The combination of blueberries and rhubarb is less common than the typical strawberry-rhubarb pairing, but it really shouldn’t be—this lovely, deep blue jam is a delicious, tangy treat. This recipe was adapted from one by jam-maker Kirsten Jennings, who first tried it at a local restaurant and liked it so much that she figured out how to make it at home."

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Blubarb Jam Ingredients

1 pound blueberries
1 pound trimmed rhubarb stalks
½ cup water
¼ cup lemon juice
2 teaspoons calcium water
1 ¼ cups sugar
2 ½ teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Blubarb Jam Directions

1. Wash your jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring canner to a rolling boil, and boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize them. (Add 1 extra minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.) Reduce heat and allow jars to remain in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan, heat to a low simmer, and hold until ready to use.

2. Rinse blueberries, remove stems, and mash in a large bowl. Set aside.

3. Rinse rhubarb, slice stalks lengthwise into thin strips, and then dice. Combine diced rhubarb in a saucepan with the ½ cup (of water. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce heat, and then simmer, covered, for 5 minutes, or until rhubarb is soft, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and mash rhubarb.

4. Measure out 2 cups of the mashed blueberries and 2 cups of the mashed rhubarb (saving any extra for another use), and combine the measured quantities in a saucepan. Add lemon juice and the calcium water, and mix well.

5. In a separate bowl, combine sugar and pectin powder. Mix thoroughly and set aside.

6. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil over high heat. Slowly add pectin sugar mixture, stirring constantly. Continue to stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

7. Can Your Jam: Remove jars from canner and ladle jam into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, put on lids and screw bands, and tighten to fingertip tight. Lower filled jars into canner, ensuring jars are not touching each other and are covered with at least 1 to 2 inches of water. Place lid on canner, return to a rolling boil, and process for 10 minutes. (Add 1 extra minute of processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level). Turn off heat and allow canner to sit untouched for 5 minutes, then remove jars and allow to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Confirm that jars have sealed, then store properly.

Tip: Frozen Ease!
You can substitute frozen berries for the fresh, and if you don’t have a lot of time, this is a good option. Simply defrost the berries, and then mash them as the recipe calls for. After defrosting, the berries will be in a lot of juice, but don’t drain them—simply incorporate all of the juice into the mashed berries.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Blue Spice Rombauer Jam Cake

This recipe is adapted by Becky Hoff from the 1975 edition of Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer and Marion Rombauer Becker.

Blue Spice Rombauer Jam Cake Ingredients

1½ cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon double-acting baking powder
½ teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon cloves
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon nutmeg
6 Tablespoons butter or shortening
1 cup packed brown sugar
2 eggs
3 tablespoons cultured sour cream *
1 cup rather firm blueberry jam (the original recipe calls for raspberry or blackberry)
½ cup broken nut meats (optional)

Blue Spice Rombauer Jam Cake Directions

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

2. Have all ingredients at about 70 degrees F. (To do this, take refrigerated items out and set them on the counter for a few hours prior to mixing.)

3. Sift, then measure the flour.

4. Resift the flour with the baking powder, baking soda, cloves, cinnamon, and nutmeg.

5. Cream the butter or shortening with the sugar until light.

6. Beat the eggs into the creamed butter and sugar, one at a time.

7. Beat in the sour cream.

8. Stir the flour mixture into the butter mixture until barely blended.

9. Stir in the jam.

10. Stir in the nuts, if using.

11. Pour the batter into a greased tube pan. Bake about ½ hour or until done. Test by sticking a toothpick into the center of your cake. If the cake is done, then the toothpick may come out a bit sticky, but not wet with batter.

* A note on cultured sour cream: Cultured sour cream is a product that is soured by fermentation, in the same manner that yogurt is prepared. Many commercial varieties of sour cream are soured by adding an acidic ingredient instead of by means of fermentation. You could certainly use any type of sour cream for this recipe, but if you would like to stick to the original directions, look for sour cream that contains "live active cultures." You may also substitute plain yogurt that contains live active cultures. And although I have not tried this, I suspect that buttermilk would make an acceptable substitute as well.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Blue Sunshine Jam

Photo by Mary Lou Sumberg

Photo by Mary Lou Sumberg

Blue Sunshine Jam is an original recipe by Renée Joslyn of Freakin' Flamingo jams in So. Miami, Florida. It is a low-sugar cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: about 3 cups

Before You Begin:
1. Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

2. Place 2 or 3 small ceramic or freezer-safe glass plates into the freezer to be ready for the gel test.

Blue Sunshine Jam Ingredients

1 large or 2 smaller lemons
2 ½ cups water
2 Tablespoons bottled lemon juice
2 cups blueberries (about 12 oz by weight)
2 teaspoons calcium water
1 ½ cups sugar, divided
1 teaspoon Pomona’s Pectin powder

Blue Sunshine Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil and boil for 10 minutes to sterilize. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small saucepan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Wash and dry the lemon(s). Cut off the ends and discard. Remove seeds. Cut the lemon(s) into thick slices, cut the slices in half, and pulse in food processor until finely chopped.

3. Put the chopped lemon, water, and bottled lemon juice into a non-reactive medium saucepot (about 4 quart size). Bring to a boil over high heat, cover, reduce heat to medium-high, and allow to boil for 10 minutes.

4. Add the blueberries, Pomona’s calcium water and 1 ¼ cups of the sugar to the pot, stir well until the sugar is dissolved, bring back to a boil and boil for 10 minutes, uncovered.

5. Mix the remaining ¼ cup sugar with the Pomona’s Pectin powder until thoroughly combined and scatter over the blueberry mixture after it has boiled for the 10 minutes. Stir well until pectin is dissolved. Allow to continue to boil for an additional 2 minutes. Remove from heat while performing the gel test.

6. Take one of the plates out of the freezer, place a small spoonful of the hot jam onto the plate and return to the freezer for 2 minutes. If the jam on the plate doesn’t run and wrinkles when you push it with the tip of a spoon or your fingertip, you’re ready to can.

7. If you don't get a good gel test (and the product on your frozen plate should not just be thick, but should give you some resistance and visibly wrinkle on the surface when the edge is pushed with the tip of a spoon), return the pot to the heat, add another teaspoon of calcium water to the pot, mix another teaspoon of pectin with just a tablespoon or two of sugar, add to the pot, bring to a hard boil while stirring briskly to dissolve the pectin. Boil for an additional 2 minutes, remove from the heat, and test again.

7. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids, fingertip tight. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Listen for the ping! Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Note: Don’t try to reduce the amount of sugar in this recipe or replace with other sweeteners; it won’t jell properly.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Blueberry Basil Frozen Margarita

Blueberry Basil Frozen Margarita

Blueberry Basil Frozen Margarita

Katharine Salzberger of Oh, Wow! Gourmet Foods shares her recipe for a cool summer drink.

You can purchase Oh, Wow! Gourmet Foods Blueberry Basil herbal fruit spread on their Facebook Page.

Blueberry Basil Frozen Margarita Ingredients

1 part of your favorite tequila
1 part Triple Sec
1 part Margarita Mix
1 Tablespoon of Oh, Wow! Gourmet Foods Blueberry Basil herbal fruit spread
Ice

Blueberry Basil Frozen Margarita Directions

Place all ingredients in a blender and blend away. Pour into your favorite Margarita glass (rimmed with sugar optional) and enjoy!

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Blueberry Jam – Video

Here at Pomona's, we were impressed with Vanessa Vargas Wilson's video on making Low-Sugar Blueberry Jam with Pomona's. We think it is worth sharing -- thanks Vanessa!

There is one thing we do differently from Vanessa in regard to jar filling and processing. We fill a jar, put the lid on, and set it aside until all the jars are ready. Then we add them all together to the boiling water in the canner. As soon as the water gets back to a rolling boil, set the timer for the proper processing time. The reason for this is that if the pectin is exposed to heat for too long, it will break down and won't be able to jell the jam.

When you click the link below, it will take you to her video on YouTube in a new window/tab. Then come back and explore our Pomona's website some more.

Here is Vanessa, making Blueberry Jam.

Vanessa is also known as The Crafty Gemini and does many other how-to craft videos on her YouTube channel.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Blueberry Pie Filling — For Canning

blueberry cut -AYield: two pint jars, which is enough for one 9" pie. To make more than that, multiply all ingredients by the number of jars you intend to make. If you are making more than two pints, be sure you use a sauce pan large enough to hold all the berries and bring them to a boil.

Ingredients – Canned Blueberry Pie Filling

8 cups whole blueberries
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon Pomona's Pectin powder
¼ cup lemon juice
2 teaspoons calcium water

Directions -- Canned Blueberry Pie Filling

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Wash and remove stems from blueberries.

3. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

4. Measure blueberries into a large sauce pan. Add lemon juice and calcium water and mix gently.

5. Bring blueberry mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring gently for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the mixture comes back up to a boil. Once the mixture returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

5. Funnel into clean, hot pint jars, leaving 1” of headspace. Wipe the rims, put on hot lids, tighten the rings to finger-tip tight, place in boiling water-bath canner, and boil for 15 minutes at sea level. Add 1 minute more for every 1,000 feet above sea level. Remove jars from canner and set on counter to cool. When completely cool, check seals; lids should be sucked down. Use within 1 year.

Important Note About Processing Time: The USDA and the National Center for Home Food Preservation have not yet established a safe processing time for quart jars of pie filling made with pectin. That is why we say to can this pie filling in pint jars. 

blue-peach pieces-A

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Blueberry-Lavender Jam

picture of lavender sprigsBlueberry-Lavender Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: about 2 ½ cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Blueberry-Lavender Jam Ingredients

2 cups mashed blueberries
1 Tablespoon lavender buds
2 Tablespoons lemon juice
1 teaspoon calcium water
1/3 cup up to ½ cup honey or ½ cup up to 1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon Pomona’s pectin powder

Blueberry-Lavender Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure sugar or honey into a separate bowl. Thoroughly mix 1 teaspoon pectin powder into sweetener.

3. Wash and mash the blueberries; measure fruit into saucepan. Add lavender buds, lemon juice, and 1 teaspoon calcium water to the fruit and stir well.

4. Bring to a boil and simmer to soften lavender buds, about 5 minutes.

5. Bring fruit to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Apricot-Lavender Jam Option: Can be made using 2 cups washed, chopped, mashed apricots for the blueberries. To soften firm apricots, bring prepared apricots to boil with ¼ cup water and simmer 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Also, use 2 teaspoons calcium water and 1 ½ teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Blueberry-Maple Preserves

DSCF5187Blueberry-Maple Preserves are a low-sweetener cooked preserve made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy. This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona's Pectin. She says:

Blueberries are a favorite fruit and I make a lot preserves with them. So I was especially interested in coming up with a version sweetened with something other than sugar. I thought maple syrup would be a good option and indeed, the maple-blueberry flavor combination is quite delightful. The maple flavor in this recipe does not overpower the blueberry flavor, but rather complements it in a lovely, understated way.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

To do ahead of time: Prepare the calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon white calcium powder (included in the Pomona’s Universal Pectin package) with ½ cup water in a small, clear container with a lid. Shake well before using. Note that you will have more calcium water than you will end up using in this recipe; simply store it in the refrigerator for later use.

Blueberry-Maple Preserves Ingredients

2¼ pounds blueberries
¼ cup water
¼ cup lemon juice
1½ teaspoons calcium water
¾ cup pure maple syrup
1½ teaspoons Pomona's Pectin powder

Blueberry-Maple Preserves Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Rinse blueberries, then remove and discard stems.

3. Place blueberries in a sauce pan along with the ¼ cup of water. Bring the berries up to a boil over high heat, stirring occasionally, and very gently, to avoid crushing the berries as much as possible. Continue to cook the berries, stirring occasionally, just until the berries have softened and have begun to release their juices -- about another 1 to 2 minutes. Then remove pan from heat.

4. Measure out 4 cups of the cooked blueberry mixture. (If you have any left over, you can use it for something else.) Pour the measured blueberry mixture into a large sauce pan. Add lemon juice and calcium water and stir to combine.

5. In a separate bowl, combine the maple syrup and pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

6. Bring blueberry mixture to a full boil over high heat. Add maple syrup-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return preserves to a boil, then remove from heat.

7. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with preserves, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to "fingertip tight" (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

8. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

9. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

10. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Enjoy your preserves! Or store properly for later use.

Recipe and photo by Allison Carroll Duffy

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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California Master Food Preserver Program

Four Master Food Preservers from California shared their experiences with us. The information below is a composite of their answers to the interview questions.

What exactly is a Master Food Preserver?
In California, University of California Cooperative Extension Master Food Preserver volunteers (MFPs) are unpaid staff members of the University of California and work through the UC Cooperative Extension program (UCCE) to educate the community on the safe practices of food preservation, including pickling, fermenting, dehydrating, canning and more. We are under the umbrella of the University of California Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources (UCANR).

A Master Food Preserver has participated in a training program (includes reading materials, lectures, tests, and hands-on training) taught by the cooperative extension office in their county. The program’s purpose is to promote safe home food preservation by training individuals (MFP’s), who then become volunteer teachers/advisors in the community. The emphasis of the program is volunteerism. There is an annual commitment to volunteer and continuing education hours that must be maintained to be a certified Master Food Preserver.

Some of the activities MFPs are chartered with:
• Answering consumer phone and email questions about food preservation
• Working in the community as local food preservation specialists
• Staffing information booths and demonstrating USDA-approved home food preservation methods at local fairs and events
• Writing articles for local publications and newsletters
• Teaching classes on various food preservation and food safety topics
• Testing pressure canner gauges for accurate use

Who do you recommend to become an MFP?
Anyone who enjoys, or thinks they would enjoy, learning about food preservation and also sharing that knowledge in and around their community. But, it's important to have more than just a passing interest in food preservation because the purpose of the program is to become certified to teach others and the instruction (lectures, quizzes, final exam, etc.) is approached a bit like a college class. Also, there is a charge for materials. Unless a person is prepared to complete the requirements and then “give back to the community” upon completion, I would not recommend it. The MFP program is not recommended for someone who is simply looking for food preservation classes; the MFP program is designed to give back to our community.

What do you love about being a Master Food Preserver?
I love being an MFP – for a long list of reasons! Contributing to the community in the role of “trusted advisor” is very gratifying. I get to talk to a diverse group of people about their different preserving interests and projects. Living where we do in California, we have a wonderful legacy of agriculture and home food production, and I see the richness of it in these conversations. For example, last summer we staffed a booth at a local pumpkin festival and I had a conversation with a gentleman who described his grandfather’s recipe for pickled figs. (Fig trees grow here like weeds.) The pride that the gentleman had in his heirloom recipe was clear and it was awesome to hear about it.

Did it lead to a paying job or a volunteer job for you?
For all, it is a volunteer job. In California, MFPs are technically not permitted to make any income or earnings if we advertise ourselves as members of the MFP group.

Where can someone get more information about the U. of California Cooperative Extension Master Food Preserver program?
Currently, the process to become a certified MFP in California varies among the counties that have the program (Humboldt, Central Sierra, Sacramento, San Bernardino, Orange County, and Los Angeles). Effective the first of this year it is now a “state-wide” program and there will be more counties coming on-line in the future. Statewide standards are in process and will be in place next year. Because of the recent surge in interest in food preservation, UC Extension is ramping up to start new MFP volunteer programs throughout the state. Sacramento County was the first in California in 1983.

This link will take you to the U. of California Cooperative Extension Master Food Preserver webpage.

Can’t wait to see “Preserving with Pomona’s . . .”

Fruit Valley Preserving Group-- Vancouver, WA

Fruit Valley Preserving Group-- Vancouver, WA

I pre-ordered my Preserving with Pomona's. Can't wait to see it and use in my classes. It is always fun to let my students try something different from just plain berry jam. Although berry jam is delicious, I like to expand their canning experience a bit. One of my favorite jams is Tomato-Strawberry Jam. My boss sometimes just shakes her head; she thinks my class experiments are odd, but once we make the jam and she tries it, she is sold. I have fun with it!

Linda Peppers, Master Food Preserver and Canning Teacher
Vancouver, WA
February 2013

CanningCraft Creates: Blueberry-Maple Preserves with Pomona’s Pectin

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

This is Allison Carroll Duffy’s second guest blog on the Pomona’s Pectin website. As a Jam Notes subscriber, you will get an “update” via email for  Allison’s occasional guest blogs. You can sign up for Jam Notes in the sidebar to the right of this page.

Here’s Allison:

Having grown up on the coast of Maine, when I think of blueberries I tend to think of the small, low-bush, wild berries that grow abundantly in these parts. Available commercially only in Maine and some of Canada, they're a key crop for the state, as well as an important part of the state's culinary heritage. And they are indeed delicious -- I have fond memories of my grandmother's wild blueberry glaze pie and wild blueberry jam. But hard as it is for me, as a Mainer, to admit, lately I have really been enjoying the larger, cultivated, high-bush blueberries that grow here as well.

DSCF5150Every year at the end of strawberry-picking season, my boys start asking when we can pick blueberries. And while you can pick wild, low-bush berries by hand, they're very small, grow close to the ground, and are typically harvested with a special kind of rake. Perhaps because of this, there are very few pick-your-own wild blueberry farms around. Pick-your-own high-bush blueberry farms, on the other hand, are relatively plentiful, and often boast gorgeous stands of mature bushes (5 or 6 feet tall is common) ready for the picking. The cultivated berries are large and grow in lovely, blue clusters so picking is a breeze -- even for very young fingers.

DSCF5165

Earlier this week my two boys and I headed for a nearby high-bush blueberry farm. It was a beautiful afternoon, we were out in the middle of a gorgeous field, and amazingly we DSCF5116were the only ones there. After some leisurely picking (and a little eating, of course), we came home with a few quarts of beautiful blue, plump fruit, ready for preserves. It was a blissful afternoon for sure, and while I imagine I'll always have a fondness for the wild variety, each time we share an afternoon like that, I fall just a little bit more in love with these delightful, delicious, quieter cousins.

Blueberry-Maple Preserves

Blueberries are a favorite fruit and I make a lot preserves with them. So I was especially interested in coming up with a version sweetened with something other than sugar. I thought maple syrup would be a good option and indeed, the maple-blueberry flavor combination is quite delightful. The maple flavor in this recipe does not overpower the blueberry flavor, but rather complements it in a lovely, understated way.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

To do ahead of time: Prepare the calcium water. To do this, combine 1/2 teaspoon white calcium powder (included in the Pomona’s Universal Pectin package) with 1/2 cup water in a small, clear container with a lid. Shake well before using. Note that you will have more calcium water than you will end up using in this recipe; simply store it in the refrigerator for later use.

Blueberry-Maple Preserves Ingredients

2 1/4 pounds blueberries
1/4 cup water
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 1/2 teaspoons calcium water
3/4 cup pure maple syrup
1 1/2 teaspoons Pomona's Pectin powder

Blueberry-Maple Preserves Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Rinse blueberries, then remove and discard stems.

3. Place blueberries in a sauce pan along with the 1/4 cup of water. Bring the berries up to a boil over high heat, stirring occasionally, and very gently, to avoid crushing the berries as much as possible. Continue to cook the berries, stirring occasionally, just until the berries have softened and have begun to release their juices -- about another 1 to 2 minutes. Then remove pan from heat.

4. Measure out 4 cups of the cooked blueberry mixture. (If you have any left over, you can use it for something else.) Pour the measured blueberry mixture into a large sauce pan. Add lemon juice and calcium water and stir to combine.

5. In a separate bowl, combine the maple syrup and pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

6. Bring blueberry mixture to a full boil over high heat. Add maple syrup-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return preserves to a boil, then remove from heat.

7. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with preserves, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to "fingertip tight" (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

8. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

9. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

10. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Enjoy your preserves! Or store properly for later use.

Recipe by Allison Carroll Duffy. To print the recipe only, click here, scroll to the bottom of the page that comes up, and click the Print button.

You can read more from Allison on her blog: CanningCraft.

You can enter our “Give Away” of Preserving with Pomona’s by signing in to the box below. It is running from August 14 through August 21 and is open to residents of the U.S. and Canada. There is nothing special you need to do to enter the give away. Everyone gets 2 free entries.

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CanningCraft Creates: Cold Comfort Jelly

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

If you want to be notified when Allison Carroll Duffy’s guest blog posts arrive, subscribe to Jam Notes  in the sidebar to the right of this page. Subscribers get “updates” via email.

Here’s Allison:

When I was a kid, whenever my siblings or I were in bed with a cough, sore throat, or otherwise nasty cold, my stepmom would make us a big mug of honey-lemon-ginger "tea." Nothing more than boiling water and lemon juice infused with ginger root and sweetened with a bit of honey, it was a simple concoction, but it provided welcome comfort -- at least a little bit -- when we were sick.

When I met my husband, I learned that he had long relied on a similar anti-cold brew that also included garlic and cayenne pepper. Sipping a hot liquid of most any kind feels good when you have a cold, but beyond this, most of these ingredients have anti-bacterial properties, which certainly doesn't hurt when it comes to fighting a cold.

Even when I'm not sick I enjoy this "tea," and these days my favorite version of it includes a lot of lemon and ginger, along with honey and a bit of cayenne pepper. It's a favorite around our house, especially this winter when it's been so cold here in Maine. Sipping a hot mug by the wood stove is a delightful way to warm up.

DSCN3445Because we drink this tea so much, I thought it would be handy to adapt it into a jelly -- a tea "concentrate" of sorts. This way, we simply scoop a couple of spoonfuls of the jelly into a mug, add boiling water, mix well, and enjoy a quick and easy mug of tea!

The jelly by itself is pretty intense (very lemony and with a bit of heat), though I do, on occasion, eat it plain or on toast. For tea, I find that 2 tablespoons of jelly per cup of boiling water works well, though you might want more or less jelly depending on your taste.

Cold Comfort Jelly

Cold Comfort Jelly is a low-honey cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Cold Comfort Jelly Ingredients

DSCN3429¼ pound fresh ginger root
2½ cups water
10-15 lemons (enough to yield 2 cups of freshly squeezed lemon juice)
¼ teaspoon cayenne powder
4 teaspoons calcium water
1½ cups honey, divided
4 teaspoons Pomona's Pectin powder

Cold Comfort Jelly Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

DSCN34402. Slice the ginger root into thin pieces--1/4 inch thick or less. Place the sliced ginger into a sauce pan, add the 2 1/2 cups water, cover with a lid, and bring the mixture to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat slightly and continue to cook, still covered, for 15 minutes. Then, remove from the heat.

3. Pour the mixture through a strainer into a large, heat-proof measuring cup or bowl. Discard the ginger pieces (or use them for something else). Measure out 2 cups of the ginger-infused liquid. If you have more liquid than you need, remove as much liquid as necessary to meet the 2 cup measurement. If you don't have enough of the ginger-infused liquid, simply add more water to meet the 2 cup measurement.

4. Juice the lemons. Pour the freshly-squeezed lemon juice through a fine mesh strainer. If necessary, use your fingers to press the pulp against the strainer, extracting as much juice as possible. Discard any seeds or pulp remaining in the strainer. Measure out 2 cups of the lemon juice. (If you have extra, you can use it for something else.)

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5. Combine the 2 cups of the ginger- infused liquid and the 2 cups of lemon juice in a sauce pan. Add the cayenne powder and calcium water, then stir to combine.

6. In a separate bowl, combine 3/4 cup of the honey and the pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

7. Bring the ginger-lemon liquid to rolling boil over high heat. Add the honey-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Add the remaining 3/4 cup honey, and stir to dissolve the honey while returning the mixture to a boil. Then, remove it from the heat.

8. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jelly, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to "fingertip tight" (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

9. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

10. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then, remove jars from canner.

11. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then, confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and Photos by Allison Carroll Duffy.

Printable Copy of the Cold Comfort Jelly recipe only.

To learn more about Allison, visit her CanningCraft blog.

CanningCraft Creates: Honeyed Pear-Lemon Marmalade

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

If you want to be notified when Allison Carroll Duffy’s guest blog posts arrive, subscribe to Jam Notes  in the sidebar to the right of this page. Subscribers get “updates” via email.

Here’s Allison:

I love apples, but if I had to choose, I'd have to say that pears are my favorite fall fruit. I love the intense sweetness and creamy flesh of a perfectly ripe pear.

But this relatively short window of perfection comes and goes quickly. Eat a pear too soon and it's likely to be hard and not all that sweet, but wait too long and your pear will become a whole lot of sweet mush.

Pears, unlike apples, are best picked when not yet ripe, and need some time off the tree to develop ideal texture and sweetness. So, when you buy your pears – whether it be from the grocery store or a local orchard – they'll likely need a few days on your counter before they're ready to use.

It's pretty easy to tell when Bartletts are ripe: they turn from green to yellow as they ripen. But with most other types of pears, color doesn't change much, so you need to rely on feel to determine when they're ready. If the pear feels firm in your hand but will yield just slightly to gentle pressure from your fingertips around the stem area, it’s ripe.

DSCN1847

You'll want to use your newly ripe pears quickly so they don't become mushy. It's possible to make a good jam with mushy, overripe pears, but for this recipe it's important to use pears that are still firm. This is because the recipe calls for pear chunks (rather than mashed pear, which is what's usually needed for jam), and the chunks need to be firm enough to remain mostly intact when cooked. I used Bartletts when I made this recipe, but any variety will work well as long as the pears are ripe and firm.

This recipe also calls for lemons, which offset the sweetness of the pears in a lovely way. Use organic lemons if possible, especially since you'll be using some of the peel. The resulting marmalade is sweet, sour, and delicious. Honey contributes a bit of warmth and depth, and the peels add a very subtle touch of bitter – perfect slathered on a piece of toast with a bit of butter on a cold, late Fall morning.

Honeyed Pear-Lemon Marmalade

DSCN1963Honeyed Pear-Lemon Marmalade is a low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Honeyed Pear-Lemon Marmalade Ingredients

2 ¼ pounds pears
4 lemons, divided
1 cup water
1 cup honey
4 teaspoons calcium water
2 ½ teaspoons Pomona's Pectin powder

Honeyed Pear-Lemonade Marmalade Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Peel the pears and remove cores. Discard peels and cores. Slice the pears into small (about ¾ inch) chunks, then set aside.

DSCN1851

3. Wash lemons thoroughly. Using a vegetable peeler, remove the yellow part of the peel from 2 of the lemons. Then slice these peels into thin, length-wise strips about 1 inch long and place in a sauce pan.

DSCN1826

4. Remove and discard the remaining white pith from the two peeled lemons. Pull these lemons apart into segments, and slice these segments into small pieces. Remove and discard any seeds, then add these lemons to the sauce pan.

5. Slice the remaining 2 lemons in half and squeeze out their juice. Set aside ¼ cup of the lemon juice. Add any remaining lemon juice to the sauce pan.

6. Add the 1 cup of water to the lemon mixture in the sauce pan. Cover mixture and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat slightly and cook, covered, for 12 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the pears and turn the heat up to high to bring the mixture back up to a boil. Reduce the heat slightly and cook the mixture, still covered and stirring occasionally, for another 5 minutes.

7. Remove the pan from the heat, empty the pear-lemon mixture into a bowl or other heat-proof container, then measure out 4 cups of the mixture. (If you have any left over, you can use it for something else.) Pour the measured quantity of the mixture back into the sauce pan. Add the remaining ¼ cup lemon juice and the calcium water, then stir to combine.

8. In a separate bowl, combine the honey and pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

9. Bring the pear-lemon mixture to a full boil over high heat. Add the honey-pectin mixture and stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve the pectin. Return the marmalade to a full boil, then remove from heat.

10. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with marmalade, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to "fingertip tight" (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

11. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

12. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then, remove jars from canner.

13. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then, confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

DSCN1968

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Printable Copy of The Recipe Only Here!

CanningCraft Creates: Honeyed Strawberry-Ginger Preserves with Pomona’s Pectin

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy is a food preserver, vegetable
gardener, cook and foodcrafter (as she calls it), and mom of two young boys. She is a Master Food Preserver,  teaches classes, and writes about canning and preserving on her own blog,
CanningCraft, as well as other places. Her new book, Preserving with Pomona's Pectin (Fairwinds Press, 2013), is available now. Her goal is to inspire people to do more canning and preserving, foodcrafting and home cooking, and to bring more of the traditional arts of the kitchen back into our homes and everyday lives.

This is Allison's first guest blog on the Pomona's Pectin website -- and we are happy to welcome her. As a Jam Notes subscriber, you will get an "update" via email for  Allison's occasional guest blogs.

Here's Allison:

It's strawberry time at last! Of course, folks in warmer climates have no doubt been enjoying local fruit for a while now, but here in Maine, we have no choice but to be patient. Strawberries are the first fruit crop of the season around here, and those grown outdoors are rarely ready before mid-June--and often the season isn't really underway until closer to the solstice. So when the fruit is finally ripe, when the fields are open for picking, and when stands selling quarts of fresh-picked berries spring up along the roadsides, are we ever ready!

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In-season strawberries are so delicious just as they are that I rarely combine them with other flavors. But earlier this week, following an afternoon of picking at our local strawberry fields, my boys and I came home with about 50 pounds of berries.

After making lots of our usual strawberry jams, and freezing a bunch of berries, we still had more to go, so I thought I'd try something new. I've yet to find a fruit that ginger doesn't complement, so I decided to give strawberries and ginger a go. And indeed, the result was quite delicious. The honey in the recipe tempers the subtle heat of the ginger, and both ingredients add a bit more complexity than strawberry jam or preserves often have.

Some jams and preserves--strawberry in particular--have a tendency to separate during processing, with the fruit floating to the top of the jar, and the liquid remaining at the bottom. Don't be alarmed--this is common. If your preserve does separate, all you need to do is mix it up well before serving. Because this is a preserve, the strawberries remain more whole than they would in a jam, which makes it an especially good topping for many desserts. Spooned on top of cheesecake or ice cream, perhaps? Yes, please.

DSCF9793

Honeyed Strawberry-Ginger Preserves

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

To do ahead of time:
Prepare the calcium water. To do this, combine 1/2 teaspoon white calcium powder (included in the Pomona’s Universal Pectin package) with 1/2 cup water in a small, clear container with a lid. Shake well before using. Note that you will have more calcium water than you will end up using in this recipe; simply store it in the refrigerator for later use.

Honeyed Strawberry-Ginger Preserves Ingredients:

2 1/4 pounds strawberries
1/2 cup water
1/4 cup lemon juice
2 teaspoons calcium water
2 teaspoons finely-grated ginger root
1 cup honey
2 teaspoons Pomona's Universal Pectin powder

Honeyed Strawberry-Ginger Preserves Directions:

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Rinse strawberries, then remove and discard stems.

3. Place strawberries in a sauce pan along with the 1/2 cup of water. Bring the berries up to a boil over high heat, stirring occasionally, and very gently, to avoid crushing the berries. Reduce the heat and simmer, covered, continuing to stir occasionally, just until the berries start to soften--about 1 to 2 minutes. Then, remove pan from heat.

4. Measure out 4 cups of the cooked strawberry mixture. (If you have any left over, you can use it for something else.) Pour the measured strawberry mixture into a large sauce pan. Add lemon juice, calcium water, and grated ginger root.

5. In a separate bowl, combine the honey and pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

6. Bring strawberry mixture to a rolling boil over high heat. Add honey-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return preserves to a boil, then remove from heat.

7. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with preserves, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands.

8. Place jars in the hot water in the canner, place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

9. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then, remove jars from canner.

10. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then, confirm that jars have sealed.

Enjoy your preserves! Or, store properly for later use.

Recipe by Allison Carroll Duffy. To print the recipe only, click here, scroll to the bottom of the page that comes up, and click the Print button.

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CanningCraft Creates: Honeyed Tomato-Jalapeno Jam

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

If you want to be notified when Allison Carroll Duffy’s guest blog posts arrive, subscribe to Jam Notes  in the sidebar to the right of this page. Subscribers get “updates” via email.

Here’s Allison:

It always seems to me, here in Maine, that our yearly growing and harvesting time frame lags a bit behind that of our neighbors in warmer climates. With April frequently cold and rainy, and consistent heat rare before June, heat-loving crops like tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants that are grown outdoors often don't reach their peak until late August, and sometimes even early September.

At least that's the case in my family's garden. This has been a fantastic tomato year for us, and we enjoyed eating a few of them here and there during August, but true to form, it wasn't until Labor Day weekend that we started to haul in real quantities of these red beauties. September has been a whirlwind of picking and canning--about 110 pounds down so far (made into sauce, salsa, and crushed tomatoes, primarily), with more to go.

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Now that it's October, and the vines are still surprisingly full, the big question is how much time is left--for the remaining tomatoes to ripen, and for me to get them inside before the first frost, which could come any day now. Even still, with lots of our tomato staples put up now, these past few days have felt a little less pressured, and I've found myself itching to make something new and different. So I thought I'd work up a tomato jam to use up some of our extra, along with some lovely green jalapenos we have growing in the garden as well.

This jam definitely has a good strong kick, but the honey tempers the heat quite a bit, and adds a pleasing complexity to the jam. It's delightful on a whole wheat cracker, along with a piece of sharp cheddar cheese.

Honeyed Tomato-Jalapeno Jam

DSCN1280Honeyed Tomato-Jalapeno Jam is a low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy. This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Honeyed Tomato-Jalapeno Jam Ingredients

3¼ pounds tomatoes
¼ cup finely chopped jalapeno peppers
2/3 cup bottled lime juice
4 teaspoons calcium water
1¼ cups honey
4 teaspoons Pomona's Universal Pectin Powder

DSCN1098

Honeyed Tomato-Jalapeno Jam Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Remove skins from tomatoes. To do this, heat a pot of water to boiling, place tomatoes in boiling water -- just a couple of tomatoes at a time -- for 30 to 60 seconds, or until the skin splits. Remove tomatoes from boiling water and immediately submerge them in a large bowl of ice water. The skins will slip right off. If the skin did not split during blanching (which occasionally happens), simply nick the skin with a paring knife and peel the skin off. Discard the skins.

3. Slice tomatoes in half, remove and discard the cores, then dice the tomatoes.

DSCN10894. Place diced tomatoes and the finely-chopped jalapeno peppers in a large sauce pan and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat slightly and cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

5. Remove the pan from the heat, empty the tomato mixture into a bowl or other heat-proof container, then measure out 4 cups of the tomato mixture. (If you have any left over, you can use it for something else.) Pour the measured quantity of the tomato mixture back into the sauce pan. Add lime juice and calcium water, then stir to combine.

6. In a separate bowl, combine the honey and pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

7. Bring the tomato mixture to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the honey-pectin mixture, Then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return the jam to a full boil, then remove from heat.

8. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jam, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to "fingertip tight" (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

9. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

10. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then, remove jars from canner.

11. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Recipe by Allison Carroll Duffy. To print the recipe only, click here, scroll to the bottom of the page that comes up, and click the Print button.

CanningCraft Creates: Kumquat Marmalade

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

If you want to be notified when Allison Carroll Duffy’s guest blog posts arrive, subscribe to Jam Notes in the sidebar to the right of this page. Subscribers get “updates” via email.

Here’s Allison:

Every so often, a package of fresh fruit will arrive on my parents' doorstep – an unexpected gift from their friend Garo who lives in California. He's sent them fresh figs from his backyard tree several times, and a month or so ago they received a box full of gorgeous orange kumquats. They love getting the fruit but, not being jam makers, they sometimes find themselves with more than they can use.

Fortunately, I often end up with their extras! When my mom came to visit a few weeks back, she stashed a good-sized bag of the kumquats in my refrigerator, and mentioned off-handedly that maybe I could make marmalade. Later, my husband pulled out the bag and sliced up a couple of the fruits for all of us to sample. What a welcome treat they were!

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In the midst of a very snowy Maine winter (yes, we still had a lot of snow and freezing temperatures throughout March!) the small golden-orange oval-shaped fruits were truly lovely to behold. What's more, never having tried kumquats before, I was very surprised to discover that the peel is slightly sweet, and not at all bitter, while the flesh is a little sour – quite unlike other types of citrus. As soon as I tasted one, I realized that marmalade was exactly what I wanted to make with them.

I'm a big fan of marmalade, but there's no question it can be a little bitter – especially if the recipe includes a lot of peel. Kumquat marmalade typically uses the whole fruit, including all the peel, and yet I find it to be much less bitter than other marmalades, due to the sweetness of the peel. What's more, kumquat peels are quite thin, so they get very soft and break down a lot during the cooking process, making the texture a bit more like jam than most marmalades are.

So, if you are not normally a fan of marmalade but are craving a bit of citrus, this is the marmalade to try! I used Nagami kumquats for this recipe, one of the more popular and widely available varieties, but other types will work as well. If your local grocery store does not carry them, specialty food stores and Asian markets often have a good selection during the winter and spring months.

Kumquat Marmalade

DSCN3858Kumquat Marmalade is a low-sugar cooked marmalade made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Kumquat Marmalade Ingredients

2 pounds kumquats
2 cups water
¼ cup lemon juice
2 teaspoons calcium water
1½ cups sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona's Pectin powder

Kumquat Marmalade Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Thoroughly rinse the kumquats. Then, slice each kumquat width-wise into several thin, quarter-sized rounds (a small, serrated knife works well for this). Remove and discard the seeds as you are working.

DSCN3829

3. Combine the sliced kumquats and the 2 cups of water in a saucepan, cover with a lid, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes, then remove from the heat.

4. Measure 4 cups of the cooked kumquat mixture. If you have extra, save it for another use. Pour the measured amount of the kumquat mixture into a sauce pan. Add lemon juice and calcium water and stir to combine.

5. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and the pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

DSCN38366. Bring the kumquat mixture to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return the mixture to a boil, then remove it from the heat.

7. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with marmalade, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to "fingertip tight" (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

8. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

9. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

10. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Printable Copy of The Recipe Only Here!

CanningCraft Creates: Pear-Vanilla Jam

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

If you want to be notified when Allison Carroll Duffy’s guest blog posts arrive, subscribe to Jam Notes  in the sidebar to the right of this page. Subscribers get “updates” via email.

Here’s Allison:

Autumn is always an emotionally powerful – and often emotionally contradictory – time of year for me. On one hand, it feels like a time of new beginnings – due largely, I think, to the school calendar being so ingrained. I still find myself, oddly, thinking of September as “the beginning of the year,” and these new beginnings are often exciting and joyful.

What's more, in some ways the natural world is at its most spectacular – late season fruits and vegetables are abundant, ripe, and ready for harvest; leaves turn brilliant, fiery shades of red and orange; and the light seems to have a rich, golden quality to it.

Yet, in the midst of all this beauty, so much around us is slowing down or dying – trees lose their leaves, plants wither, and animals prepare to hibernate – as we move closer and closer to winter. And of course, the flip side of fall’s new beginning is the inevitable change that comes with it, so the passage of time feels especially acute at this time of year. For me, it's a time when joy often overlaps with challenge and sadness. An emotionally complicated season for sure.

And this fall has been no exception. I am homeschooling both of our boys for the first time this year, and I've been working toward making this happen for quite some time. I'm thrilled that they are finally back home much of the time now – and so are they (admittedly, my oldest more so than my youngest). And yet, at times, it has been surprisingly difficult and emotionally trying as we all settle into our new routines.

On top of that, one of my closest family members suffered a life-threatening medical event a few weeks ago. After some extremely scary and upsetting days, he is now recovering well, and I am deeply, deeply grateful. Indeed, autumn is putting us through our paces this year; her complex nature is in full-flower . . . at least around these parts.

Admittedly, this is a bit of a digression from jam. But all of this is to say that, when it comes to jam making – and cooking in general, for that matter – all I really care about right now is making food that's nourishing, delicious, and simple. Somehow that's what seems to be most important. And frankly, it's all I can manage at the moment anyway. Fortunately, this delicious jam fits the bill perfectly. Enjoy!

bowl of pearsPear-Vanilla Jam

Pear-Vanilla Jam is a low-sugar cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Pear-Vanilla Jam Ingredients

3¼ pounds ripe pears
1 vanilla bean
¼ cup lemon juice
4 teaspoons calcium water
1 cup sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona's Universal Pectin powder

Pear-Vanilla Jam Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Peel pears and remove cores. Then, place pears in a large bowl and mash them thoroughly (a potato masher works well for this).

3. Measure out 4 cups of the mashed pear (you may have some left over; if so, you can use it for something else.) Pour the measured amount of mashed pear into a large sauce pan.

4. Slice vanilla bean pod in half lengthwise, then scrape out the seeds (a paring knife works well for this). Add the vanilla seeds, along with the pod itself, to the mashed pear. Add the lemon juice and calcium water, then stir to combine.

5. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

6. Bring the pear mixture up to rolling boil over high heat. Add sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return jam to a boil, then remove from heat. Using a pair of tongs, carefully remove and discard the vanilla bean pod.

7. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jam, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to "fingertip tight" (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

8. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1 to 2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

9. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then, remove jars from canner.

10. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

pear-vanilla jam

Printable Copy of The Recipe Only Here!

CanningCraft Creates: Rose Hip-Apple Jelly

A picking rose hips

Allison gathering her rose hips

Beach roses are a common sight here in coastal Maine, and I've always had a fondness for them – they remind me of salty air, sand, and the ocean.

When we visit the shore in June and early July, these wild, hardy shrubs (technically called Rosa Rugosa) are covered with pretty pink or white flowers. In August, as the flowers fade, the plant's small, edible, round-ish fruits – or rose hips – become more prominent, growing larger and more colorful as they ripen. My feeling is always a little bittersweet when I notice that the rose hips have turned a deep, reddish-orange and have started to soften; it's a sure sign that summer is nearing its end.

Of course, the silver lining is that these gorgeous, sour-sweet rose hips are at their peak and ready to pick! Ripe rose hips are red and slightly soft, so when you are picking, look for these. Under-ripe rose hips are hard and quite sour, while over-ripe rose hips are often mushy and bug-infested . . . you'll obviously want to avoid both of those. Also, steer clear of any rose hips that may have been sprayed with pesticides.

bowl of rose hips

Rose hips can be used in all kinds of ways, but one of my favorite things to do with them is to make jelly. For something a little different this year, I thought I'd combine them with apples, as apples are in season here now as well, and I find that their sweetness offsets the tartness of the rose hips beautifully.

One thing to keep in mind when making this recipe (or any jelly recipe, for that matter) is that the amount of water you need for cooking the fruit in order to end up with the necessary amount of juice can vary a bit depending on the ripeness and juiciness of the fruit.

If, after a few hours, you find that your fruit mash is not yielding enough juice, simply dump the fruit back in the sauce pan, add a little bit more water, cover it, turn up the heat, and cook it for a couple of minutes. Then return the fruit mash to the jelly bag, hang it up again, and allow the bag to keep dripping until you have enough juice.

Tempting as it is to squeeze the jelly bag to get more juice out of it, try not to, as you'll end up squeezing some of the pulp into your juice, and that will result in a cloudy jelly.

 

jars of jelly on stepsRose Hip-Apple Jelly

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Rose Hip-Apple Jelly Ingredients

3 pounds rose hips
3 pounds apples
6 cups water
2 Tablespoons lemon juice
4 teaspoons calcium water
1 cup sugar
4 teaspoons Pomona's Pectin powder

Rose Hip-Apple Jelly Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Cut off and discard the stems of the rose hips, along with any damaged spots. Rinse well.

3. Rinse the apples and coarsely chop. There is no need to remove the peels or the cores.

4. Combine rose hips, chopped apples, and the 6 cups of water in a large sauce pan. Cover and bring to a boil. Reduce heat slightly and simmer, stirring occasionally, until fruit is soft and mashable – about 15 to 20 minutes.

rose hips-apple in bowl

5. Remove pan from heat and thoroughly mash the fruit (a potato masher works well for this).

dripping juice6. Transfer mashed fruit into a jelly bag. (If you don't have a jelly bag, an impromptu bag made from layers of cheesecloth wrapped around the mashed fruit and gathered at the top works equally well.) Suspend the jelly bag over a large bowl and allow the mashed fruit to drip juice into the bowl until you have accumulated the necessary quantity. This will likely take 2 to 4 hours.

7. Measure out 4 cups of the juice. If you have any extra juice, save it for another use. Pour the measured amount of juice into a sauce pan, then add the lemon juice and calcium water. Stir to combine.

8. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and the pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

9. Bring juice mixture to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return the mixture to a boil, then remove it from the heat.

10. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jelly, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to "fingertip tight" (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

11. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water.) Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

12. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

13. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Rosehip-Apple Jelly

Rose Hip-Apple Jelly on whole wheat toast

 

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Printable Copy of Rosehip-Apple Jelly Recipe only.

CanningCraft Creates: Seedless Raspberry-Honey-Vanilla Jam

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

I must admit to a somewhat sentimental attachment to raspberries. As a kid, I spent summers on an island (aptly named Raspberry Island) overflowing with wild raspberry bushes.

My brother and I would spend hours amidst the brambles picking the bright red, sweet-tart, little gems. Occasionally we'd pick enough berries that we'd need to use our t-shirts as makeshift baskets to carry them back to the house, but mostly we would just eat them as we picked.

Sentimental attachments aside, raspberries are just plain delicious – the quintessential summer fruit. So when we moved to our new home a few years ago, one of the first things we planted was a good-sized patch of raspberry bushes. Finally this summer, the canes are starting to bear a decent quantity of fruit.

Our boys are thrilled; recently they've gotten in the habit of running down to the raspberry patch at various points during the day to see if there are any newly ripe berries . . . and if there are, they eat them immediately. They've become such berry fans that I had to ask them to hold off on the eating part for just a bit so that I could have enough berries to make this recipe! A good problem to have, of course.

Connor, Dylan, and the raspberries

Connor and Dylan in the raspberry patch

 

Raspberry seeds don't really bother me (they aren't nearly as annoying as blackberry seeds), so I generally just ignore them. On occasion, however, I've thought that it might be nice to indulge in a bit of raspberry goodness totally unencumbered by seeds. So the boys and I made this recipe the other day.

 

Jar of jam

To remove the seeds, I pressed mashed raspberries through a fine mesh strainer. It's a bit of a time-intensive process, but the results are totally worth it. This jam is smooth in the way that a jelly is, but has much more body since it's made from the pulp of the fruit, not just the juice (as is the case with most jellies).

For the sweetest, richest-tasting jam, be sure to use berries that are fully ripe.

 

 

Seedless Raspberry-Honey-Vanilla Jam

cropped raspberry jam on breadSeedless Raspberry-Honey-Vanilla Jam is a low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy. This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin.

She says: "This jam is smooth in the way that a jelly is, but it has much more body since it's made from the pulp of the fruit, not just the juice (as is the case with most jellies). For the sweetest, richest-tasting jam, be sure to use berries that are fully ripe."

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Seedless Raspberry-Honey-Vanilla Jam Ingredients

3 level quarts of raspberries
1 vanilla bean
2 teaspoons calcium water
1 cup honey
2 teaspoons Pomona's Pectin powder

Seedless Raspberry-Honey-Vanilla Jam Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

Baskets of berries

2. Pick through raspberries, discarding any stems. If raspberries look clean, rinsing them is optional.

3. Place berries in a large bowl and mash them thoroughly (a potato masher works well for this).

cropped Mashing raspberries

4. Place a mesh strainer over a large bowl, and transfer mashed berries into the mesh strainer. Press the mashed berries through the strainer (the back of a wooden spoon, as well as clean fingers, works well for this), so that the raspberry pulp goes through the strainer into the bowl below, while the seeds remain in the strainer.

Mashing with little sieve

5. Measure out 4 cups of the raspberry pulp (you may have some left over; if so, you can use it for something else.) Pour the measured pulp into a large sauce pan.

6. Slice vanilla bean pod in half lengthwise, then scrape out the seeds (a paring knife works well for this). Add the vanilla seeds, along with the pod itself, to the raspberry pulp. Add the calcium water as well, and stir to combine.

7. In a separate bowl, combine the honey and pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

8. Bring raspberry pulp to rolling boil over high heat. Add honey-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return jam to a boil, then remove from heat. Using a pair of tongs, carefully remove and discard the vanilla bean pod.

9. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jam, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to "fingertip tight" (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

10. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

11. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

12. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

You will find the recipe only (with fewer pictures) here.

You will find our Pomona's Day Give Away (book, pectin, jars, funnel), which is happening August 5 through August 13, 2014, here.

CanningCraft Creates: Seedless Wild Blackberry Jam

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

As announced in our September Jam Notes, this is Allison Carroll Duffy’s third guest blog on the Pomona’s Pectin website. Jam Notes subscribers get “updates” via email when Allison’s occasional guest blogs are posted. You can sign up for Jam Notes in the sidebar to the right of this page.

Here’s Allison:

A couple of years ago my family and I moved into an old farmhouse on a few acres. We soon learned from neighbors that wild blackberry bushes used to cover the back of the property, and that the previous owners had spent a lot of time and effort trying to get rid of them.

Some people do consider them a nuisance, and indeed the bushes are thorny, but I happen to adore the gorgeous, deep-purple fruit they bear. Fortunately for us, the previous owners were not entirely successful in their task--a lovely, modestly sized wild blackberry patch remains along the border of our yard.

DSCF5460While the bushes didn't bear well last year, they're covered with gorgeous, good-sized, dark purple berries this summer, and we've been picking them like crazy just to keep up (and to keep ahead of the birds, who love them, too!)

The thorns are definitely large and sharp, but I find that wearing a long sleeve shirt and long pants while picking provides enough protection that thorns aren't a big deal. However, there is one thing about wild blackberries that I'm really not crazy about, and that's the seeds.

Cultivated blackberries tend to have fewer seeds, but wild blackberries are absolutely loaded with them. In the past, I've made jam just by mashing the wild berries, but I never was crazy about it because of all the seeds. This summer, now that we have our own, prolific patch of these berries, it was time to come up with a seedless version of blackberry jam.

DSCF5466Making seedless jam from wild berries isn't hard to do, but it does take a little time and persistence--both in the picking and the making--but I can tell you that the results are absolutely worth it.

If you're planning on using wild berries, be sure to pick in an area that has not been sprayed with weed-killers or anything else. If wild blackberries don't grow in your area, cultivated berries are an equally delicious substitute.

DSCN0859The basic idea in making a seedless jam is to separate the seeds from the fruit pulp. I find that the easiest way to do this is by pressing the mashed berries through a mesh strainer.

When choosing a strainer, make sure that the mesh is fine enough so that the seeds don't get through, but not too fine--if the mesh is too fine, only the juice of the berries will go through, not the pulp--and you want as much pulp as possible to pass through the strainer. Most standard kitchen strainers should fit the bill.

Use whatever tool you are comfortable with to press the mashed berries through the strainer; I like to use the back of a wooden spoon, along with my (clean) fingers. This process can take a little time, but stick with it if you can--the more pulp you press through the better, as you'll ultimately be composting the seeds and whatever else doesn't get pressed through the strainer.

You should end up with about four cups of lovely, purple blackberry pulp--almost totally free of seeds--with which to make your jam. In the end, you'll be rewarded with a luscious, smooth, spreadable jam that is delicious slathered on pancakes, muffins, toast and--according to my two young boys anyway--just about anything else.

DSCF5526Seedless Wild Blackberry Jam

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Seedless Wild Blackberry Jam Ingredients

3 quarts of blackberries
2 teaspoons calcium water
1 ¼ cups sugar
2 teaspoons Pomona's Pectin powder

Note: Many wild blackberries are quite sour, but if you are using the sweeter wild blackberries found on the West Coast, add 2 Tablespoons lemon juice to the berries at the same time that you add the calcium water. You can make this recipe with cultivated blackberries. If they are quite sweet, however, you need to add 1/4 cup lemon juice when you add the calcium water to be sure they are acid enough for safe water bath canning.

Seedless Blackberry Jam Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Pick through blackberries, discarding any stems. If blackberries look clean, rinsing them is optional.

3. Place berries in a large bowl and mash them thoroughly ( a potato masher works well for this).

4. Place a mesh strainer over a large bowl, and transfer mashed berries into the mesh strainer. Press the mashed berries through the strainer (the back of a wooden spoon, as well as clean fingers, work well for this), so that the blackberry pulp goes through the strainer into the bowl below, while the seeds remain in the strainer.

5. Measure out 4 cups of the blackberry pulp. (If you have any left over, you can use it for something else.) Pour the measured pulp into a large sauce pan. Add calcium water and stir to combine.

6. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

7. Bring blackberry pulp to rolling boil over high heat. Add sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return jam to a boil, then remove from heat.

8. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jam, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to "fingertip tight" (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

9. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1,000 feet above sea level.)

10. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then, remove jars from canner.

11. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then, confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe by Allison Carroll Duffy. To print the recipe only, click here, scroll to the bottom of the page that comes up, and click the Print button.

You can read more from Allison on her blog: CanningCraft.

You can enter our “Give Away” of Preserving with Pomona’s by signing in to the box below. It is running from September 18 through September 25 and is open to residents of the U.S. and Canada.  Everyone gets 2 free entries.

We love your comments, however, leaving a comment on this blog post does not enter you into the Give Away.

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CanningCraft Creates: Sweet Cherry-Rhubarb Jam

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

I love rhubarb season. Here in Maine, rhubarb is one of the earliest fresh green edibles to emerge from the soil each spring, so it's always a much-anticipated treat. It's delicious in pie, in jam, or simply stewed with a little honey.

Its sour, slightly astringent tang also makes it a perfect partner for sweeter fruits. Strawberries and rhubarb are a classic combination, but lately I've been itching to try some other pairings. Sweet cherries are a favorite of mine, and while they're not in season here in Maine yet, some readers in warmer climates may have local cherries available, so I thought I'd give Cherry-Rhubarb Jam a go.

 

cherries

And what a treat it is! The jam is a beautiful deep, rich red, and the cherries are sweet enough to offset the tartness of the rhubarb without having to add a lot of extra sugar. Be sure to use sweet cherries (Bing cherries, for example), not sour cherries.

To remove the cherry pits, you can use a pitter if you have one, but it's not necessary; simply slice the cherries in half with a paring knife and pick out the pits. To chop the pitted cherries, I use a chef's knife, but you can also chop them in a food processor.

cutting rhubarbAs for the rhubarb, select fresh, firm stalks. Most rhubarb for sale at farmers’ markets or grocery stores has already been trimmed, but if not (or, if you're harvesting it yourself) be sure to trim it thoroughly, completely removing and discarding all leaves. The stalks are the only part you want to use, as the leaves themselves are poisonous.

 

trimmed rhubarbTypically, the stalks are similar in size to celery stalks, though this can vary. The color varies also, from green to red and anywhere in between. For the deepest red jam, select stalks that are red rather than green. In terms of taste and texture, though, both work equally well – and both make delicious jam.

 

Try this jam swirled into yogurt or on top of vanilla ice cream . . . oh so good!

cherry-rhubarb jam-yogurt

 Sweet Cherry-Rhubarb Jam

Sweet Cherry-Rhubarb Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Sweet Cherry-Rhubarb Jam Ingredients

1¼ pounds sweet cherries
1 pound trimmed rhubarb stalks
½ cup water
2 tablespoons lemon juice
3 teaspoons calcium water
1¼ cups sugar
2 ½ teaspoons Pomona's Universal Pectin Powder

Sweet Cherry-Rhubarb Jam Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Rinse the cherries, remove and discard stems and pits, then chop the cherries.

3. Rinse the rhubarb stalks, slice them into thin, length-wise strips, then dice. In a saucepan, combine diced rhubarb with the ½ cup of water and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer, stirring occasionally, for approximately 5 minutes, or until rhubarb is soft. Remove pan from heat, then mash the rhubarb.

4. Measure 2 cups of the chopped cherries, and 2 cups of the mashed rhubarb. If you have extra, save it for another use. Pour the measured amounts of cherries and rhubarb into a sauce pan. Add lemon juice and calcium water and stir to combine.

5. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and the pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

6. Bring the cherry-rhubarb mixture to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return the mixture to a boil, then remove it from the heat.

7. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jam, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to "fingertip tight" (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

8. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

9. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

10. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Cardamom Peach Pie Filling — For Canning

Peach good-A

This recipe was created and contributed by Ashley Baugh, a Pomona's home jam maker. Ashley says: "It was a huge success! The filling is perfectly thick for pie filling; the taste is also amazing, like peachy Christmas. We made peach jam sweetened with honey with the peach parts we couldn't use for the filling and it was also fantastic."

Yield: two pint jars, which is enough for one 9″ pie. To make more than that, multiply all ingredients by the number of jars you intend to make. If you are making more than two pints, be sure you use a sauce pan large enough to hold all the peach slices and bring them to a boil.

Ingredients – Cardamom Peach Pie Filling

5 cups peach slices
½ cup white sugar
¼ cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon Pomona's Pectin powder
3 Tablespoons water
3 Tablespoons lemon juice
1 teaspoon calcium water
1/8 teaspoon cloves
¼ teaspoon nutmeg
¼ teaspoon allspice
¼ teaspoon ginger
½ teaspoon cinnamon
½ teaspoon cardamom

Directions – Cardamom Peach Pie Filling

1. Prepare 5 cups of peach slices. Set aside.

2. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

3. Measure peach slices, water, lemon juice, calcium water, and spices into a sauce pan. Bring to a boil and boil gently for several minutes until peach slices are thoroughly heated.

4. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring gently for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve pectin while the mixture comes back up to a boil. Once the mixture returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

5. Funnel into clean, hot pint jars, leaving 1” of headspace. Wipe the rims, put on hot lids, tighten the rings to finger-tip tight, place in boiling water-bath canner, and boil for 15 minutes at sea level. Add 1 minute more for every 1,000 feet above sea level. Remove jars from canner and set on counter to cool. When completely cool, check seals; lids should be sucked down. Use within 1 year.

Important Note About Processing Time: The USDA and the National Center for Home Food Preservation have not yet established a safe processing time for quart jars of pie filling made with pectin. That is why we say to can this pie filling in pint jars. 

Additional Notes:
1. Best to use fresh peach slices. If using frozen slices that have been defrosted, reduce the amount of water or the filling may be too liquidy.

2. You can use other sweeteners that measure like sugar, and it's possible to use less sugar if you prefer the pie less sweet. (We used 1/3 cup mixed white and brown sugar.) It's also possible to use honey or another liquid sweetener, but we haven't tried it that way. Our best guess is ¼ cup up to ½ cup liquid sweetener.

3. Leave out the spices if you want plain peach pie filling.

peach piece-A

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Chocolate Berry Jam

Chocolate Berry Jam is a low-sugar cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Chris Wilson of LunaGrown Fine Gourmet Jam, who created this wonderful recipe, says: “This jam is great for a romantic picnic. It makes a wonderful pairing with Swiss cheese, a sharp white cheddar, or a feta goat cheese. It can also be accompanied by fresh pears and apples, served with a Cabernet and some brown bread. The flavor of the chocolate will increase as the jam sets, so depending on your palate you might taste only a hint at first.

Yield: about 8 to 10 cups          Chris’s advice: always boil an extra jar!

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water may be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

CHOCOLATE BERRY JAM INGREDIENTS

1 pound blueberries (about 3 cups)
1 pound raspberries (about 3 cups)
It’s okay to mash the berries if you prefer. If you don’t mash, some will break apart and some will remain whole in the cooking process.
2 1/2 cups unsweetened apple juice (About 4-6 apples if juicing your own – Chris prefers Roma.)
4 teaspoons calcium water
2 Tablespoons lemon juice
3 cups sugar, divided
3 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder
2-3 Tablespoons organic chocolate flavoring (Chris uses Flavorganics brand.)

CHOCOLATE BERRY JAM DIRECTIONS

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small saucepan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Pour apple juice into jam pot. Do not skim off foam or strain.

3. Add rinsed fruit to jam pot. Add calcium water and lemon juice and mix well.

4. Measure 1 cup of the sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Skim off foam. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Skim off foam.

6. Add the remaining 2 cups of sugar, stirring well as you add.

7. Add chocolate flavoring and stir well.

8. When mixture returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat and skim any foam
Important Note: If you have skimmed foam along the way, there should be very little on the top of your batch. If you continue to stir with your ladle once heat is turned off, any foam (jam bubbles) will dissipate on its own.

9. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

CHRIS’S ADVICE FOR JAM, PICNICS, AND BEES!

Since it is that time of year for bees…. Sometimes open jam containers (anything sweet really) attract bees at otherwise fun and elegant functions. Fresh sliced cucumbers (preferably from the Farmer’s Market, not the grocery store) will keep bees at bay. Slice or carve the cucumbers at your intended function, saving the juice as well, and place intermittently on tables or in planters. The scent of the cucumber will keep the bees away. This will not work for heavily perfumed folks.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Chocolate Berry Jam & More

This recipe is written to be made with Pomona’s Universal Pectin.
Chris Wilson of LunaGrown Fine Gourmet Jam, who created this wonderful recipe, says: “This jam is great for a romantic picnic. It makes a wonderful pairing with Swiss cheese, a sharp white cheddar, or a feta goat cheese. It can also be accompanied by fresh pears and apples, served with a Cabernet and some brown bread. The flavor of the chocolate will increase as the jam sets, so depending on your palate you might taste only a hint at first.”

Yield: about 8 to 10 cups          Chris’s advice: always boil an extra jar!

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water may be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Chocolate Berry Jam Ingredients

1 pound blueberries (about 3 cups)
1 pound raspberries (about 3 cups)
It’s okay to mash the berries if you prefer. If you don’t mash, some will break apart and some will remain whole in the cooking process.
2 1/2 cups unsweetened apple juice (About 4-6 apples if juicing your own – Chris prefers Roma.)
4 teaspoons calcium water
2 Tablespoons lemon juice
3 cups sugar, divided
4 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder (3-1/2 if you've juiced your own apples)
2-3 Tablespoons organic chocolate flavoring (Chris uses Flavorganics brand.)

Chocolate Berry Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small saucepan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Pour apple juice into jam pot. Do not skim off foam or strain.

3. Add rinsed fruit to jam pot. Add calcium water and lemon juice and mix well.

4. Measure 1 cup of the sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Skim off foam. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Skim off foam.

6. Add the remaining 2 cups of sugar, stirring well as you add.

7. Add chocolate flavoring and stir well.

8. When mixture returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat and skim any foam
Important Note: If you have skimmed foam along the way, there should be very little on the top of your batch. If you continue to stir with your ladle once heat is turned off, any foam (jam bubbles) will dissipate on its own.

9. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

CHRIS’S ADVICE for JAM, PICNICS, AND BEES!

Since it is that time of year for bees…. Sometimes open jam containers (anything sweet really) attract bees at otherwise fun and elegant functions. Fresh sliced cucumbers (preferably from the Farmer’s Market, not the grocery store) will keep bees at bay. Slice or carve the cucumbers at your intended function, saving the juice as well, and place intermittently on tables or in planters. The scent of the cucumber will keep the bees away. This will not work for heavily perfumed folks.

Chris is working on a book, Beyond the Bread, and shares a few more of his favorite recipes below.

Berry Lemonade

Chris says: “I enjoy this with my leftover jams for a special summer drink…. A bit different every time.”

Berry Lemonade Ingredients

Juice of 4 lemons
1/2 cup sugar, or to taste
1 quart of water
Assorted berry flavor jams

Berry Lemonade Directions

Juice lemons and run through a fine mesh sieve to remove any seeds. Add sugar and water and stir to combine. Chill completely. To serve put 1 tbsp. jam into each glass (I used raspberry and blackberry). Fill with ice and pour lemonade over the top. Add a swizzle stick for stirring and a lemon slice to garnish.

Baked Brie Appetizer

Chris says: “This makes for something special to bring to an evening affair.”

Baked Brie Ingredients

1 sheet frozen puff pastry, thawed
1 (8 ounce) round Brie cheese
1/3 cup raspberry jam (or whatever your favorite is)
2 Tablespoons chopped walnuts

Baked Brie Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil and lightly grease with cooking spray. Lay the puff pastry onto the prepared baking sheet. Center the Brie wheel onto the pastry. Spread the jam evenly over the top of the Brie. Sprinkle the walnuts atop the jam. Fold the puff pastry over the top of the Brie, sealing all openings. Bake in preheated oven until the pastry is golden brown, about 20 minutes.

Homemade Jam Butter

Chris says: “I use this recipe constantly and sometimes substitute the Jam Butter for fresh herb butter. It’s really very simple and extremely impressive!”

Homemade Jam Butter Ingredients

1 quart heavy whipping cream
5 Tablespoons Jam
Salt

Homemade Jam Butter Directions

In a large bowl, slowly pour in heavy cream while mixer is running. This will slowly begin to thicken. As it does, add your jam one spoonful at a time and continue to mix, adding a dash of salt (to taste). The cream will begin to solidify leaving a watery substance. When this occurs transfer butter into a cheese cloth and shape as a large softball. Allow to sit for a few hours, or overnight, on top of a measuring cup or such, so that the butter milk drips into the container leaving the butter in the cheese cloth. Chill and serve. You may scoop individual servings by using a melon scoop. The butter milk may be used for other cooking purposes or add it to your flower bed for some beautiful blooms!

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

Print

Chocolate Cherry Preserves

Chocolate Cherry Preserves

Chocolate Cherry Preserves

Excerpted from Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin by Allison Carroll Duffy (Fair Winds Press, June 2013)

Allison says, "Chocolate and cherries were made for each other, and this preserve is proof. The combination of the two is insanely decadent. Be sure to use high-quality cocoa powder that is unsweetened and has no other added ingredients. Spoon this preserve on top of cheesecake for a stunning—and absolutely heavenly—dessert."

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Chocolate Cherry Preserves Ingredients

2 1/2 pounds sweet cherries
1∕3 cup sifted, unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 cup water
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1∕8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/4 cup lemon juice
3 teaspoons calcium water
1 1/4 cups sugar
2 1/2 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Chocolate Cherry Preserves Directions

1. Wash your jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring canner to a rolling boil, and boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize them. (Add 1 extra minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.) Reduce heat and allow jars to remain in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan, heat to a low simmer, and hold until ready to use.

2. Rinse cherries, remove stems, and then slice in half and remove pits.

3. Combine cherry halves with cocoa powder and the 1/2 cup of water in a saucepan. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce heat, and simmer, covered, for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat.

4. Measure 4 cups of the cooked mixture (saving any extra for another use), and return the measured quantity to the saucepan. Add cinnamon, cayenne pepper, lemon juice, and calcium water. Mix well.

5. In a separate bowl, combine sugar and pectin powder. Mix thoroughly and set aside.

6. Bring cherry mixture back to a full boil over high heat. Slowly add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring constantly. Continue to stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve pectin while the preserves come back up to a boil. Once the mixture returns to a full boil, remove the pan from the heat.

7. Can Your Preserves: Remove jars from canner and ladle preserves into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, put on lids and screw bands, and tighten to fingertip tight. Lower filled jars into canner, ensuring jars are not touching each other and are covered with at least 1 to 2 inches of water. Place lid on canner, return to a rolling boil, and process for 10 minutes. (Add 1 extra minute of processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level). Turn off heat and allow canner to sit untouched for 5 minutes, then remove jars and allow to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Confirm that jars have sealed, then store properly.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Chokecherry Jelly

chokecherry

Photo by Born 1945. Used under Creative Commons license.

Chokecherry Jelly is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Chokecherry Jelly Ingredients

4 cups chokecherry juice
¼ cup lemon juice
4 teaspoons calcium water
½ cup up to 1 cup honey or ¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
4 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Chokecherry Jelly Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small saucepan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Prepare chokecherry juice.

3. Measure juice into saucepan.

4. Add calcium water and lemon juice and mix well.

5. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

6. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

7. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Note: You can taste the jam after the pectin has dissolved and the fruit mixture has come back to a full boil. Once the pectin is dissolved, you are free to add extra sweetener above the range given in the recipe. Stir in the extra sweetener well and bring the mixture back to a good boil before turning off the heat and jarring.

Photo by Born 1945. Used under Creative Commons license.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Cold Comfort Jelly

DSCN3445Cold Comfort Jelly is a low-honey cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy. This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona's Pectin.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Cold Comfort Jelly Ingredients

DSCN3429¼ pound fresh ginger root
2½ cups water
10-15 lemons (enough to yield 2 cups of freshly squeezed lemon juice)
¼ teaspoon cayenne powder
4 teaspoons calcium water
1½ cups honey, divided
4 teaspoons Pomona's Pectin powder

Cold Comfort Jelly Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

DSCN34402. Slice the ginger root into thin pieces--1/4 inch thick or less. Place the sliced ginger into a sauce pan, add the 2 1/2 cups water, cover with a lid, and bring the mixture to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat slightly and continue to cook, still covered, for 15 minutes. Then, remove from the heat.

3. Pour the mixture through a strainer into a large, heat-proof measuring cup or bowl. Discard the ginger pieces (or use them for something else). Measure out 2 cups of the ginger-infused liquid. If you have more liquid than you need, remove as much liquid as necessary to meet the 2 cup measurement. If you don't have enough of the ginger-infused liquid, simply add more water to meet the 2 cup measurement.

4. Juice the lemons. Pour the freshly-squeezed lemon juice through a fine mesh strainer. If necessary, use your fingers to press the pulp against the strainer, extracting as much juice as possible. Discard any seeds or pulp remaining in the strainer. Measure out 2 cups of the lemon juice. (If you have extra, you can use it for something else.)

DSCN3423

5. Combine the 2 cups of the ginger- infused liquid and the 2 cups of lemon juice in a sauce pan. Add the cayenne powder and calcium water, then stir to combine.

6. In a separate bowl, combine 3/4 cup of the honey and the pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

7. Bring the ginger-lemon liquid to rolling boil over high heat. Add the honey-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Add the remaining 3/4 cup honey, and stir to dissolve the honey while returning the mixture to a boil. Then, remove it from the heat.

8. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jelly, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to "fingertip tight" (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

9. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

10. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then, remove jars from canner.

11. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Then, confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and Photos by Allison Carroll Duffy.

Read Allison’s full blog post for Cold Comfort Jelly.

To learn more about Allison, visit her CanningCraft blog.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Concord Grape Butter

Concord Grape Butter is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. This recipe can be used for Muscadine grape butter also. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: about 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Concord Grape Butter Ingredients

3 pounds Concord grapes (wash, remove stems, and mash)
½ cup water

Bring above ingredients to a boil then simmer covered on low for 10 minutes. Strain out seeds and skins with a Foley mill.

Make Concord Grape Butter with:
4 cups thick, pulpy juice
½ teaspoon cinnamon
¼ teaspoon cloves
2 teaspoons calcium water
½ cup up to ¾ cup honey or 1 cup up to 2 cups sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Concord Grape Butter Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure fruit and spices into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and mix well.

4. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Concord Grape Jam

Concord Grape Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Concord Grape Jam Ingredients

3 lbs Concord grapes (to make 4 cups prepared grapes)
2 teaspoons calcium water
½ cup up to 1 cup honey or ¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
2 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Concord Grape Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Pop the skins off the grapes and set the skins aside. To separate the pulp and juice from the seeds, either put the skinless grapes through a Foley Mill or cook the skinless grapes with a little water, mash them up, and put through a Foley Mill or strainer. Collect all the juice and pulp and discard the seeds.

3. Puree the skins in a food processor or blender. Add the pureed skins to the juice and pulp and mix together well.

4. Measure 4 cups prepared grapes into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and mix well.

4. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

5. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Cookbook & Pectin Give Away

small HoneyPlumCardamomJelly

We are so excited about our new Pomona's cookbook that we are giving it away! Besides the 75 inspiring recipes created by Allison Carroll Duffy, Preserving with Pomona's Pectin is loaded with exquisite pictures of jam, jelly, marmalade, preserves, and conserves. And to top it all off, there is an introductory chapter that just may be the best "Jam-Making How-To" out there.

Wondering what kind of recipes are in the book? How about Chocolate-Cherry Preserves, Margarita Marmalade, Strawberry-Vanilla Preserves, or Honeyed Plum-Cardamom Jelly for starters. Click on the link at the bottom of this post to get the Honeyed Plum-Cardamom Jelly recipe shown in the picture. And we'll share more pictures and recipes from the book on our website as time goes on.

Give Away Details

We will give away a total of 6 copies of the book together with a box of pectin over the next 3 months:  2 books & boxes in July;   2 books & boxes in August;   and 2 books & boxes in September. Each give away is open to residents of the U.S.

The July entry dates are from July 12 through July 21.

The give aways will be hosted on our website. We will announce each give away by emailing everyone on our U.S. Jam Notes subscription list, by posting a link to the give away blog page on our Pomona's Pectin, For Jam & Jelly Facebook page, and by tweeting about each one. (If you don't already receive Jam Notes, you can sign up here.)

We are doing the give aways through Rafflecopter. Sign in and enter the give away using the box below. If you've never entered a Rafflecopter give away, click here for a video and diagram of how it works.

Leaving a comment on this blog post does not enter you into the Give Away.

Winners will be randomly chosen. We will email the winners to send us their mailing address. The names of the winners will be posted on the Pomona's Pectin website blog 48 hours after the giveaway ends.

Note: CanningCraft is Allison Carroll Duffy's Facebook and Twitter.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

You can get the Honeyed Plum-Cardamom Jelly recipe here.

You can read Allison's guest blog post and brand new recipe for Honeyed Strawberry-Ginger Preserves here.

Cranberry Jelly

Cranberry Jelly is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona's Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Cranberry Jelly Ingredients

2 - 12 ounce bags of fresh or frozen cranberries
2 cups of water

Bring above ingredients to a boil then simmer covered on low until the cranberries burst and soften. Drip through a jelly bag to get 4 cups of cranberry juice.

Make Cranberry Jelly with:
4 cups cranberry juice
4 teaspoon calcium water
½ cup up to 1 cup honey or ¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
4 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Cranberry Jelly Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure cranberry juice into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and lime juice (if using) and mix well.

4. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

5. Bring juice to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jelly comes back up to a boil. Once the jelly returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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Cranberry-Habanero Jelly

cranberryhabanerojellyExcerpted from Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin by Allison Carroll Duffy  (Fair Winds Press, June 2013)

Allison says: "Hot pepper aficionados will appreciate the distinctive kick of this habanero pepper jelly, yet it’s mild enough that it can be enjoyed by those who like only very small amounts of heat. The cranberries add a brilliant red hue to this translucent, yellow-flecked jelly. Served with cream cheese and crackers, it makes a gorgeous and spicy addition to any appetizer table. Remember, for canning safety, do not increase the quantity of any peppers in this recipe."

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona's pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Cranberry-Habanero Jelly Ingredients

¼ cup finely chopped cranberries
1 ¼ cups seeded, finely diced yellow bell pepper
2 teaspoons seeded, minced habanero pepper
1 ½ cups white vinegar
2 ½ cups sugar, divided
2 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder
2 teaspoons calcium water

Cranberry-Habanero Jelly Directions

1. Wash your jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring canner to a rolling boil, and boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize them. (Add 1 extra minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.) Reduce heat and allow jars to remain in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan, heat to a low simmer, and hold until ready to use.

2. Combine chopped cranberries, diced yellow pepper, minced habanero pepper, and vinegar in a saucepan. Cover, bring to a boil, and then reduce heat and simmer, still covered, for 5 minutes. Remove from heat.

3. In a separate bowl, combine pectin powder with ½ cup of the sugar. Mix thoroughly and set aside.

4. Add calcium water to the pepper mixture, mix well, and return the mixture to a full boil over high heat. Slowly add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring constantly. Continue to stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve pectin while the jelly returns to a boil. After the pectin is fully dissolved, add the remaining quantity of sugar and stir to dissolve it. Once sugar is dissolved, and the jelly returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

5. Can Your Jelly: Remove jars from canner and ladle jelly into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, put on lids and screw bands, and tighten to fingertip tight. Lower filled jars into canner, ensuring jars are not touching each other and are covered with at least 1 to 2 inches of water. Place lid on canner, return to a rolling boil, and process for 10 minutes. (Add 1 extra minute of processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level). Turn off heat and allow canner to sit untouched for 5 minutes, then remove jars and allow to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Confirm that jars have sealed, then store properly.

TIP: Holy Hotness!
Habanero peppers are about as hot as they come, and getting even a little on your skin can be quite painful. Always wear gloves when working with them, do not let them come in contact with any part of your body (especially your eyes). Use common sense to keep safe and pain free!

For more inspiring recipe ideas, see Preserving with Pomona's Pectin: The Revolutionary Low-Sugar, High-Flavor Method for Crafting and Canning Jams, Jellies, Conserves, and More by Allison Carroll Duffy and the Pomona's Partners, published by Fair Winds Press, June 2013, and available in paper or ebook everywhere books are sold.

Pomona's Pectin is available at natural food stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, and many others), food co-ops, farm stands, Williams-Sonoma, a growing number of conventional grocery stores with natural food sections (like Wegmans, QFC, Fred Meyer, and others), and from our website, as well as from other online sellers.

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