Jam Notes: New Year, New Recipes, New Ideas

February 2017

Table of Contents

CanningCraft Creates: Lemon Marmalade & Meyer Lemon Marmalade

Conner holding marmalade jars

Lemon Marmalade on the left and Meyer Lemon Marmalade on the right, as you face the picture

 

Santa Barbara’s Organic Soup Kitchen

Marisa McClellan: Pineapple Orange Jelly with Fruit Juice Concentrate

Lindsay Landis: Triple Citrus Marmalade

Honeybell Hibiscus Jelly from Suwanee Rose

Learn to Make Jam with Rachel Adams

Read the Complete, Original February 2017 Jam Notes Here.

Triple Citrus Marmalade

Jars of Triple Citrus MarmaladeTriple Citrus Marmalade was created by Lindsay Landis and reprinted with her permission from the Winter edition of That’s My Jam, her set of 4 e-books. The Summer and Fall editions are also available now. The Spring edition will be released on March 13 and can be pre-ordered here.

Lindsay loves making jam, in addition to cooking and baking. Her blog, Love and Olive Oil, has additional jam and jelly recipes as well as many other delicious recipes.

Lindsay says: “Three times the citrus, three times the charm. This brilliantly hued marmalade is made with ruby red blood oranges, blush pink cara cara oranges, and deep yellow Meyer lemons. You can use any assortment of citrus you like, about 3 pounds worth, as long as you have 2½ cups of citrus ‘stuff’ to work with.”

Yield: 4 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Triple Citrus Marmalade Ingredients

1¼ pounds blood oranges
1¼ pounds cara cara oranges
¾ pound Meyer lemons
2 cups granulated sugar – divided
2 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder
1 cup filtered or spring water
2 teaspoons calcium water

Triple Citrus Marmalade Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Wash and scrub citrus, then fully zest using a ribbon zester. Cut off pith, then segment fruit, discarding seeds. Squeeze out remaining juice from membrane. You should have a total of 2½ cups citrus zest, pulp, and juice.

3. Whisk together 1 cup of sugar with pectin until evenly distributed; set aside.

4. Pour prepared citrus and water into a large, heavy saucepan. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer, covered, for 10 minutes or until softened. Add calcium water and increase heat to bring back to a full rolling boil.

5. Whisk in sugar/pectin mixture, stirring vigorously until completely dissolved and mixture returns to a boil. Whisk in remaining 1 cup sugar, stirring until dissolved, and then bring back to a full rolling boil once more.

6. Remove from heat and ladle jam into hot jars, leaving 1/4-inch of head space. Wipe jar rims and screw on lids. Process for 10 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Note: In Steps 3 & 5, Lindsay “whisks”; we “stir.”

Recipe and photo by Lindsay Landis

You may also like: Satsuma Marmalade, Honeyed Pear-Lemon Marmaladeor Kumquat Marmalade.

covers of 4 e-booksThat’s My Jam e-book series is a beautifully designed set of books. Lindsay Landis has lovingly created a variety of original recipes, many of which use Pomona’s Pectin, and some of which don’t use any pectin at all. Summer, Fall, and Winter are currently available; Spring will be released on March 13 and can be pre-ordered here

Pineapple Orange Jelly

Book cover Naturally Sweet Food in JarsPineapple Orange Jelly was created by Marisa McClellan and is reprinted with permission from Naturally Sweet Food in Jars © 2016 by Marisa McClellan, Running Press, a member of the Perseus Book Group.

Marisa is a writer, teacher, and blogger at Food in Jars. She lives in Philadelphia and creates a wide variety of yummy eats to put up in jars from her small kitchen there.

Marisa is currently engaged in the Food in Jars Mastery Challenge, a year-long (2017) food preservation challenge with a different skill to focus on and explore each month. January’s challenge was Marmalade; February’s is Salt Preserving; and March will be Jelly.

Back to the topic at hand, here’s what Marisa says about Pineapple Orange Jelly: “This jelly is a hit with lovers of tropical fruit. If you have a juicer, try making the pineapple juice at home. If not, seek out the good stuff from your local high-end market and skip the kind that comes sealed into a can.”

Yield: 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Pineapple Orange Jelly Ingredients

3 cups fresh pineapple juice, strained
1½ cups freshly squeezed orange juice, strained
½ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice, strained
1 tablespoon calcium water
1 cup white grape juice concentrate
1½ Tablespoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Pineapple Orange Jelly Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Combine the pineapple juice, orange juice, lemon juice, and calcium water in a large, non-reactive pan. Set over high heat and bring to a boil.

3. Cook at a hard boil for 5 to 6 minutes.

4. Stir the pectin powder into the juice concentrate. Add the concentrate-pectin mixture to the boiling juice and stir vigorously.

5. Bring the juice back to a boil and cook for an additional 2 to 3 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars leaving ¼” of head space at the top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Pineapple Orange Jelly on toast

You may also like: Pineapple Jam (from fresh pineapple); Sunrise Marmalade; Orange-Pineapple Jelled Salad; or Rhubarb-Pineapple-Orange Jam.

Book cover Naturally Sweet Food in JarsNaturally Sweet Food in Jars by Marisa McClellan is a lovely cookbook containing 100 lower-sweetener preserve recipes made with coconut sugar, maple syrup, maple sugar, agave, fruit juice concentrates, and dried fruits as sweeteners. Some recipes are for jams or jellies that use Pomona’s Pectin; many are for other types of preserves — glazes, shrubs, pickles, sauces, chutneys — that don’t require any pectin. This book is a wonderful opportunity to broaden your preserving repertoire.

Jam Notes: Organic Soup Kitchen Creates a Healthy Community

Organic Soup Kitchen logoBy Mary Lou Sumberg

Organic Soup Kitchen (OSK) in Santa Barbara, California, is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing organic, nutritious, wholesome food, mostly soups, to cancer survivors and those with degenerative diseases. Their mission: Create a healthier community.

What does this have to do with Pomona’s Pectin? OSK also makes a pudding called “Chia Delight.” Their clients love to eat this pudding as a dessert, but it’s much more than a sweet dessert; it’s a nutrient-dense food and excellent source of healing for anyone dealing with an illness.

container of chia delight pudding

Chia Delight was formulated to be an immune system support and improve the digestive system, using ingredients like coconut milk and medium-chain triglycerides (to fight bacterial infection and viruses), pectin as a toxin absorber, chia seeds to increase energy, flax seed for the intestinal tract, and organic unfiltered apple juice for a healthy colon and as a sweetness enhancer. And their customers love it.

A Social Business

 

Pots of soup

OSK is different from other non-profits: their innovative vision is to be a “social business.” They work on creating positive change within the community while pursuing financial, economic, and environmental sustainability. For example, OSK pursues financial sustainability by generating a surplus that can be used for expansion, improvement, and diversification, while minimizing dependency on grants and donations. In addition, they work closely with local, organic farmers and local retailers of natural, healthy, organic food.

We at Pomona’s say: More Power to Them! What a great mission they have. And it doesn’t stop there. OSK is working on passing their model on to other communities so they can also create a healthier community.

group making soup

Want to Get Involved?

If you live in Santa Barbara and would like to get involved, click here to go to the OSK website volunteer page. If you live anywhere and would like to make a donation to OSK (money or in-kind), click here to go to the OSK website donation page. Donations are 100% tax deductible. You can also give a call: (805) 284-3552.

Andrea Slaby-Carroccio, COOIf you’re interested in building something similar to OSK in your community, Andrea Slaby-Carroccio, COO of OSK has this advice:

“You must have a passion for what you do and enjoy it, because it’s not about the money. We work very hard and long hours – if we didn’t enjoy it – it would be challenging. We love to cook and educate individuals on how to eat healthy and incorporate it into their life. Running and starting a non-profit is very difficult – I’d recommend you interview or volunteer with another non-profit that is in alignment with what you would want to do to see the overall challenges and rewards.”

Unfortunately OSK is not at liberty to share their exact Chia Delight pudding recipe, but Andrea says: “Any chia pudding recipe you find on the internet will do – we do not add or use any sugar – we use fruit and coconut to keep it naturally sweet.”

I use Pomona’s Pectin as a gluten replacer . . .

I just wanted to tell you I love your product! But I’ve never made jam with it. Rather, I use Pomona’s Pectin as a gluten replacer in my homemade gluten-free pie crust — and it’s so good everyone at Thanksgiving raved about my pie. I was looking for a way to reduce use of xanthan gum in gluten-free baking. I tried pysllium husk, chia seeds, and flax seed with poor results. I then decided to try pectin.

Pomona’s Pectin allowed me to greatly reduce the xanthan gum in the recipe to a mere 1/8 teaspoon. I’m hoping with more tweaking I’ll be able to eliminate the xanthan gum in my pie crust altogether.

Pomona’s has worked so well in my pie crust, I’m going to try it in other gluten-free baked goods.

I found not all pectin is created equal. Yesterday I made a batch of pie crust using Sure Jell (the only brand at that particular grocery store). While the crust is delicious, the dough cracked and tore as I rolled it out. I’ve never had that problem with my Pomona’s Pectin crust.

Cate Gallagher
Rutherford, CA
December 7, 2016

Short story is that my blackberry jam turned out PERFECT!

Not to bore you, but I had a bumper crop from a maturing blackberry planting. After giving away many gallons, I thought I would see if I could make blackberry jam for the very first time in my life. Being a beekeeper, I wanted to use minimum sweetener and honey of course. I did some research and found good reports on your product.

This morning I took a deep breath and followed the instructions that come with Pomona’s Universal Pectin. Short story is that my blackberry jam turned out PERFECT! I was so happy. You deserve a pat on the back. Great product. Thank you.

Jerry Hayes
Gray Summit, Missouri
November 12, 2016

My next try I’m going to cut out even more sugar.

I am so happy I found your pectin! I love homemade blackberry jam. But I hated that the standard pectins – even the low sugar ones – require so much sugar to fruit.

I’ve looked several times on the internet for information on using less sugar, and finally I found an article about your pectin. I bought some from Amazon over the summer. And just yesterday I defrosted a couple packs of berries and tried a 10 cups berries to 3 1/2 cups sugar ratio.

It jelled up better than my last attempts with Sure Jell, which came out runny. And even with less sugar it was perfectly sweet. My next try I’m going to cut out even more sugar. I really am so happy to find this!

Karen Mathis
Rio Oso, CA
November 1, 2016

CanningCraft Creates: Caramelized Onion-Maple Jam

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

Oh, I think I have found a new favorite condiment!

Loaded with caramelized onions, and sweetened with maple syrup and apple cider, this soft-set jam is rich, earthy, and complex. It has quickly become my go-to jam for dressing up a cheese plate, and it’s delicious alongside roast turkey or roast pork, so it’s perfect for the holiday season.

This jam doesn’t contain many ingredients, so quality is key. Be sure to use 100 percent real maple syrup, and use fresh apple cider if you can get it. Apple juice will do in a pinch, but cider is better, as it’s sweeter, richer, and has a more complex flavor.

The other key to success with this recipe is technique — which is not something I say about very many recipes. The deliciousness of this jam is due largely to the successful caramelization of the onions, as well as the concentration of flavors by cooking down the jam to reduce the liquid content. Neither of these things are difficult to do (so in case you are worried, please don’t be!), but a little attention to detail will go a long way, especially in step 3.

Most of us are used to caramelizing onions in fat such as butter or oil, but this recipe, as it is designed to be a can-able recipe, calls for caramelizing the onions without any fat, so the process is a little bit different.

crackers, cheese, onion jamCaramelized Onion-Maple Jam

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Caramelized Onion-Maple Jam Ingredients

2 pounds onions (6 cups sliced)
1 teaspoon salt
3 cups apple cider
1 cup plus 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar (5% acidity)
¼ teaspoon black pepper
2 teaspoons calcium water
1 cup maple syrup
2 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Caramelized Onion-Maple Jam Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Peel the onions and discard the skins. Slice the onions very thinly, and then cut the thin slices into approximately one-inch lengths. Place sliced onions in a sauce pan – ideally, a heavy-bottomed one that conducts heat evenly. Add the salt, then mix.

sliced and cut onions

Sliced and Cut Onions

3. Put the pan on the stove, cover the pan with a lid, and cook the onions over medium to medium-low heat for about 5 minutes. While the onions are cooking, occasionally lift the lid and give the onions a quick stir to be sure that they are not starting to burn. If they are, reduce the heat slightly, replace the lid as quickly as possible, and keep cooking. If the onions are really sticking, you may add a very tiny bit of the apple cider to ease the sticking, but only do this if it’s really necessary.

After 5 minutes or so, the onions should have caramelized a good bit, and should begin to have a nice golden-brown color. If not, cook the onions for a little bit longer, with the lid still on, to achieve this. At this point, when the onions have really started to brown, they’ll probably want to start sticking. So, remove the lid, reduce the heat if necessary, and stir constantly, scraping off and incorporating the brown bits on the bottom of the pot as necessary for a couple more minutes. This will allow the onions to continue to brown and caramelize while preventing burning.

caramelized onion in pan

Caramelized Onion in the Pan

4. After the onions are caramelized and well-browned, add the apple cider, the vinegar, and the pepper to the onions. Increase the heat and bring the mixture up to a boil. Cook the mixture at a low boil for a couple of minutes, stirring frequently, to allow the liquid to reduce in volume.

5. Remove the pan from the heat, then measure the mixture. (A large-capacity, heat-tolerant measuring container works well for this, as it allows you to transfer the mixture from the pan directly into the measuring container). If the quantity of the mixture is more than 4 cups, place the mixture back in the pan and allow it to continue cooking until you have reduced the quantity to 4 cups, measuring as necessary to confirm quantity. If you find that you have less than 4 cups, add a small, additional amount of apple cider to bring the total quantity of the mixture back up to 4 cups. Transfer the onion mixture back into the sauce pan, add calcium water, and then stir to combine.

6. In a separate bowl, combine the maple syrup and pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

maple syrup and Pomona's pectin powder

7. Bring the onion mixture to full boil over high heat. Add the maple syrup-pectin mixture, and then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return the jam to a boil, and then remove from heat.

8. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with preserves, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

9. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

10. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

11. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

jam on spoon in and in jar

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Printable copy of the Caramelized Onion-Maple Jam only here.

Caramelized Onion-Maple Jam

crackers, cheese, onion jamCaramelized Onion-Maple Jam is a low-sweetener cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin. She says: “This jam doesn’t contain many ingredients, so quality is key. Be sure to use 100 percent real maple syrup, and use fresh apple cider if you can get it. Apple juice will do in a pinch, but cider is better, as it’s sweeter, richer, and has a more complex flavor.

“The other key to success with this recipe is technique – which is not something I say about very many recipes. The deliciousness of this jam is due largely to the successful caramelization of the onions, as well as the concentration of flavors by cooking down the jam to reduce the liquid content. Neither of these things are difficult to do (so in case you are worried, please don’t be!), but a little attention to detail will go a long way, especially in step 3.

“Most of us are used to caramelizing onions in fat such as butter or oil, but this recipe, as it is designed to be a can-able recipe, calls for caramelizing the onions without any fat, so the process is a little bit different.”

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Caramelized Onion-Maple Jam Ingredients

2 pounds onions (6 cups sliced)
1 teaspoon salt
3 cups apple cider
1 cup plus 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar (5% acidity)
¼ teaspoon black pepper
2 teaspoons calcium water
1 cup maple syrup
2 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Caramelized Onion-Maple Jam Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Peel the onions and discard the skins. Slice the onions very thinly, and then cut the thin slices into approximately one-inch lengths. Place sliced onions in a sauce pan – ideally, a heavy-bottomed one that conducts heat evenly. Add the salt, then mix.

sliced and cut onions

Sliced and Cut Onions

3. Put the pan on the stove, cover the pan with a lid, and cook the onions over medium to medium-low heat for about 5 minutes. While the onions are cooking, occasionally lift the lid and give the onions a quick stir to be sure that they are not starting to burn. If they are, reduce the heat slightly, replace the lid as quickly as possible, and keep cooking. If the onions are really sticking, you may add a very tiny bit of the apple cider to ease the sticking, but only do this if it’s really necessary.

After 5 minutes or so, the onions should have caramelized a good bit, and should begin to have a nice golden-brown color. If not, cook the onions for a little bit longer, with the lid still on, to achieve this. At this point, when the onions have really started to brown, they’ll probably want to start sticking. So, remove the lid, reduce the heat if necessary, and stir constantly, scraping off and incorporating the brown bits on the bottom of the pot as necessary for a couple more minutes. This will allow the onions to continue to brown and caramelize while preventing burning.

caramelized onion in pan

Caramelized Onion in the Pan

4. After the onions are caramelized and well-browned, add the apple cider, the vinegar, and the pepper to the onions. Increase the heat and bring the mixture up to a boil. Cook the mixture at a low boil for a couple of minutes, stirring frequently, to allow the liquid to reduce in volume.

5. Remove the pan from the heat, then measure the mixture. (A large-capacity, heat-tolerant measuring container works well for this, as it allows you to transfer the mixture from the pan directly into the measuring container). If the quantity of the mixture is more than 4 cups, place the mixture back in the pan and allow it to continue cooking until you have reduced the quantity to 4 cups, measuring as necessary to confirm quantity. If you find that you have less than 4 cups, add a small, additional amount of apple cider to bring the total quantity of the mixture back up to 4 cups. Transfer the onion mixture back into the sauce pan, add calcium water, and then stir to combine.

6. In a separate bowl, combine the maple syrup and pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

maple syrup and Pomona's pectin powder

7. Bring the onion mixture to full boil over high heat. Add the maple syrup-pectin mixture, and then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return the jam to a boil, and then remove from heat.

8. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with preserves, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

9. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

10. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

11. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Read Allison’s complete blog post here.

You may also like: Savory Spiced-Mango Conserve, Pear-Cranberry Conserve with Almonds and Crystallized Ginger, or Cranberry-Orange-Pear Holiday Jam.

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