Pear-Raspberry Jam

Pear-Raspberry JamPear-Raspberry Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Pear-Raspberry Jam Ingredients

2½ pounds ripe pears
2 cups whole raspberries
3 Tablespoons lemon or lime juice
3 teaspoons calcium water
1 1/8 cups sugar or ½ to 1 cup honey
2½ teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Pear-Raspberry Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Wash, peel, core, and mash pears. Measure 3 cups mashed pear into saucepan.

3. Wash and mash raspberries. Measure 1 cup mashed raspberries into saucepan.

4. Add calcium water and lemon juice, and mix well.

5. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

6. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

7. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

You may also like: Pear-Apple JamCranberry-Orange-Pear Holiday Jam, Pear-Cranberry Conserve with Almonds and Crystallized Ginger, Pearberry Jam, or Pear-Vanilla Jam.

Pear-Apple Jam

Pear-Apple Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 3 to 4 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Pear-Apple Jam Ingredients

1¾ pounds ripe pears (about 6 small to medium pears)
1 pound apples (about 3 medium apples)
3 Tablespoons lemon juice
2 teaspoons calcium water
¼ teaspoon cinnamon
1/3 cup up to ¾ cup honey or ½ cup up to 1½ cups sugar
2 teaspoons Pomona pectin powder

Pear-Apple Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Wash, peel, core, and mash the pears. Measure 2 cups mashed pear into sauce pan. If pears are too firm to mash, chop the pears then cook with a little water until they go soft. Mash the cooked pears and measure 2 cups into sauce pan.

3. Wash, peel, core, and chop the apples then cook with a little water until they go soft. Mash cooked apples. Measure 1 cup mashed apple into sauce pan.

4. Add calcium water, lemon juice, and cinnamon, and mix well.

5. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

6. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

7. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Option: If you like maple syrup, try this recipe with maple syrup as your sweetener — same measurement as the honey.

You may also like: Apple Pie Jam, Pear-Raspberry Jam, Pear-Vanilla Jam, or Pear-Cranberry Conserve with Almonds and Crystallized Ginger.

Mimosa Jelly

Mimosa Jelly is a low-sugar cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Our Mimosa Jelly recipe was inspired by two Pomona’s customers: Emilie Kenworthy and Sam Leonard.

With help from Connie, Emilie made the recipe below using all fresh-squeezed Cara Cara orange juice and was thrilled with the results. She said: “It came out perfectly! I’m attaching a picture so you can see the gorgeous color. I’m going to make another batch to give to my mama friends for Mother’s Day.”

Sam found the Peach-Champagne Jelly recipe in Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin by Allison Carroll Duffy. He substituted orange juice for the peach juice and wrote to us: “Can you say Mimosa Jelly? OMG, try not to eat a whole jar in one sitting.” Sam used store-bought orange juice, not from concentrate, with nothing added.

The main recipe below has a more champagne-forward flavor. The recipe described in Option 1 below has a more fruit-forward flavor.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Mimosa Jelly Ingredients

2 cups Orange Juice without pulp (fresh squeezed or no-calcium-added store bought)*
2 cups champagne or spumante or prosecco or sparkling wine
2 teaspoons calcium water
¼ cup lemon juice
¾ cup sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

*We used a combination of reconstituted orange juice from concentrate and fresh squeezed juice from Cara Cara oranges. The juice from the Cara Cara oranges is slightly pink and sweet and added a special depth of flavor.

Mimosa Jelly Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Measure orange juice and champagne into sauce pan.

3. Add calcium water and lemon juice, and mix well.

4. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

5. Bring juice mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

6. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Option 1: For a more fruit-forward jelly, you can use a different ratio of orange juice to champagne: 3 cups of orange juice to 1 cup of champagne. If you increase the juice and reduce the champagne, you may want to increase the sugar some (we used 1 cup of sugar with this ratio). The lemon juice, calcium water, and Pomona’s pectin powder remain the same.

Option 2: Sweetness can vary depending on the orange juice you use. If you’re concerned about whether the jelly will be sweet enough, taste after Step 5. If you want it to be sweeter, you can add more sugar now. Turn on the heat, stir in the new sugar and bring the mixture back to a full boil. Turn off heat and go on to Step 6.

Like this recipe? You might also like: Blissini Jelly, Red Wine Jelly, White Wine Jelly

Satsuma Marmalade

Satsuma Marmalade jarSatsuma Marmalade is a low-sugar cooked marmalade made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

We thank Jo-Ann Monconduit of Jo’s Jellies in New Orleans for sending us this recipe. She found it on the Culicurious Blog, which is dedicated to exploring food and cooking via the lens of culturally relevant recipes, ingredients, and experiences — definitely worth checking out.

Jo-Ann wanted a low-sugar Satsuma Marmalade, so we converted it to a Pomona’s Pectin recipe for her. When we tried it, we couldn’t help but exclaim –Best Marmalade Ever!

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Satsuma Marmalade Ingredients

1 pound Satsumas (preferably organic as you will be eating the peel)
3 cups water
2 teaspoons calcium water
¼ cup Meyer lemon juice
¼ teaspoon ground ginger
½ teaspoon ground cardamom
½ teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup sugar (plus more if needed after pectin is dissolved – we used 1¼ cups total)
3 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Satsuma Marmalade Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Wash and peel Satsumas. Set the peels aside. Once all the satsumas are peeled (there is no need to scrape the white off the peel) julienne all the peels and measure 1 packed cup of thinly sliced peel. Set aside for now.

3. Over a bowl, so as not to lose any of the juice, cut each section of the peeled Satsumas in half and remove any seeds; sometimes even seedless Satsumas do have seeds. Also remove some of the stringy white threads that cling to the fruit if there are a lot of them. You should have about 1½ cups of pulp and juice.

4. Once the seeds are removed, add the pulp and juice to a food processor and pulse 5 times to break up membranes and any remaining pith.

5. Measure 1 cup of the pulsed pulp and juice into a sauce pan. Add the julienned peels and the 3 cups of water. Bring to a boil and then reduce to a simmer. Continue to simmer uncovered for 20 minutes. Remove from heat.

6. Measure 4 cups of fruit mixture and return the measured quantity to the sauce pan. If you are a little bit short, add water to bring up to 4 cups.

7. Add calcium water, lemon juice, ginger, cardamom, and vanilla extract, and mix well.

8. Measure 1 cup sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

9. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the marmalade comes back up to a boil. Once the marmalade returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat and taste. If the sweetness is right for you, go on to Step 11 below.

10. If you want it to be sweeter, you can add more sugar now. Turn on the heat, stir in the new sugar and bring the mixture back to a full boil. Turn off heat.

11. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Satsuma Marmalade

Like this recipe? You might also like Kumquat Marmalade, Terry’s Chocolate Marmalade, Honeyed Pear-Lemon Marmalade

kumquat marmalade jar and toast

Kumquat Marmalade recipe and photo by Allison Carroll Duffy

Pepper Jelly with Sugar or Honey

Pepper Jelly with Sugar or Honey is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked hot pepper jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 3 to 4 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Pepper Jelly with Sugar or Honey Ingredients

1 cup seeded, finely chopped bell peppers
1/3 cup seeded, finely chopped jalapeno peppers (leave seeds in for more heat)
1 1/3 cups vinegar standardized to 5% acidity
2 teaspoons calcium water
1½ cups honey or 2 1/3 cups sugar, divided
1½ teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Pepper Jelly with Sugar or Honey Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Wash, seed, and finely chop bell peppers. Then measure into sauce pan.

3. Wash, seed (if desired), and finely chop jalapeno peppers. Then measure and add to sauce pan.

4. Measure vinegar into sauce pan.

5. Bring peppers and vinegar to a boil and simmer covered for 5 minutes.

6. Turn off heat, add calcium water, and mix well.

7. Measure ½ cup of the sugar or ½ cup of the room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into the ½ cup of sweetener. Set aside.

8. Return pepper mixture to the heat and bring to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin.

9. Add remaining sugar or honey once pectin is dissolved. Stir well and return to a full boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

10. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Options: It is fine to vary the ratio of finely chopped bell peppers and jalapeno peppers as long as you don’t exceed a total of 1 1/3 cups of finely chopped peppers.

It is fine to use peppers other than jalapenos for the hot peppers.

Use white vinegar, apple cider vinegar, or wine vinegar, as long as it is standardized to 5% acidity.

Pepper Jelly with Agave and Stevia is here.

You may also like: Peach-Jalapeno Jelly, Cranberry-Habanero Jelly, Pepper Jam — Hot as You Like!, or Peach-Jalapeno Jam.

Pearberry Jam

Pearberry Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 3 1/2 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Pearberry Jam Ingredients

2½ cups peeled, cored, mashed pear
½ cup processed raw cranberries
2½ teaspoons calcium water
2 Tablespoons lemon juice
¾ cup plus 1/8 cup sugar or ½ cup honey
2 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Pearberry Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Wash, peel, core, and mash pears.

3. Wash cranberries, then finely chop in food processor or blender.

4. Measure correct amounts of both pear and cranberry into sauce pan.

5. Add calcium water and lemon juice, and mix well.

6. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

7. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

8. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Fig-Rhubarb-Lemon Jam

Fig-Rhubarb-Lemon Jam is a low-sugar cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Janet Mercurio of Winters, California, brought us a recipe similar to this one. It sounded so good that Connie worked with the original to convert it to a low-sugar Pomona’s recipe.

Janet followed the converted recipe and reported back: “I really like it — the sweet and tart flavor reminds me a bit of marmalade. And it’s nice to know it doesn’t have a ton of added sugar. I’m so looking forward to sharing it with my family members!

“Thank you both so much for your product. Now I have something new and exciting to do with all of my figs. I just need to plant some rhubarb — I had to buy this batch. Ciao!”

Yield: about 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Fig-Rhubarb-Lemon Jam Ingredients

2 cups chopped and mashed fresh figs
2 cups cooked rhubarb
1 lemon for zesting/grating
¼ cup lemon juice
3 teaspoons calcium water
2 cups sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Fig-Rhubarb-Lemon Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Rinse, stem, chop, and mash figs.

3. Wash and trim rhubarb stalks. Cut into ½ inch pieces. Put in saucepan, add just a little water, and simmer until soft.

4. Finely zest/grate the peel of 1 lemon.

5. Measure mashed figs, cooked rhubarb, lemon zest, lemon juice, and calcium water into sauce pan. Stir well.

6. Measure sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

7. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

8. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Garlic Jelly

Garlic Jelly is a low-sugar cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: about 3 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Note: This jelly must be started 24 hours before you plan to make it.

Garlic Jelly Ingredients

1 cup red wine vinegar 5% acidity*
2 Tablespoons minced garlic
1 cup water
2 teaspoons calcium water
1 1/3 cups sugar, divided
2 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Garlic Jelly Directions

1. Measure vinegar into bowl. Mince garlic and add to vinegar. Cover and let stand for 24 hours.

2. After 24 hours, strain vinegar to remove garlic. Garlic can be discarded. Add 1 cup water to strained vinegar and stir to mix. Set aside.

3. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use

4. Put vinegar/water combination into a sauce pan.

5. Add calcium water to sauce pan and mix well.

6. Measure 1 cup sugar into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sugar. Set aside.

7. Bring vinegar mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sugar mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin.

8. Once pectin is dissolved, add the additional 1/3 cup sugar and stir well while the jelly comes back up to a boil. Once the jelly returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

9. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

*It is important for canning safety to use vinegar that is 5% acidity.

Water Bath Canning: Step-by-Step

Knowing the steps for Water Bath Canning is important if you want shelf-stable jam or jelly that you can store for up to one year at room temperature.

Before you start making your jam or jelly —

 

Supplies

1. Gather your supplies (clockwise from left):

  • Canning funnel
  • Canning jars (4-ounce up to 16-ounce)
  • Rack
  • Pomona’s Pectin and directions
  • Large canning pot and lid
  • Headspace measuring/bubble freeing tool
  • Flat lids and screw-on bands
  • Jar lifter
  • Magnetic lid lifter

2. Wash jars, lids, and bands.

 

Filling canner and jars with water

3. Put jars on rack in water bath canner; fill jars and canner with water at least 1 to 2 inches above the tops of the open jars. Depending on how big your canner is, you may want to use a pitcher or tea kettle to finish filling it on the stove.

4. Lower rack into pot. Cover and bring to a boil. Turn heat down or off and keep cover on in order to keep jars and water hot.

If you want to sterilize your jars, boil for 10 minutes then turn heat down or off and keep cover on in order to keep jars and water hot.

The USDA guidelines say that if you plan to water bath process your jam or jelly for at least 10 minutes, it isn’t necessary to sterilize empty jars prior to filling. Since all of our recipes call for processing for at least 10 minutes, sterilization prior to filling is not required.

 

Lids warming in sauce pan

5. Put lids in a small sauce pan, cover with water; bring to a simmer; turn off heat and put cover on pan to keep the water warm. You are softening the circle of sealing compound to help get a good seal.

 

Bands laid out on dish towel

6. Keep the bands nearby.

 

When you have removed your jam or jelly from the heat and are ready to put it in the jars —

 

Lifting empty jar out with jar lifter

1. Using a jar lifter, remove all of the jars from the canner one-by-one.

Pouring jar water back into canner

2. Dump the water in each jar back into the canner. Place the jars on the counter ready to be filled.

3. Turn the heat up under the canner and put the lid back on. You want the water in the canner to be boiling when you put the filled jars back in. This is important because if it takes too long to bring the water back to a boil, the pectin could be de-activated from too much heat exposure.

 

Filling jar with ladle and funnel

4. Using a funnel and a ladle, fill all the jars.

 

Measuring headspace of filled jar

5. Leave 1/4″ of head space in each jar.

 

Wiping rim with damp paper towel

6. Wipe the rim of each jar with a damp cloth or paper towel.

 

Removing lid with lid lifter

7. Using a magnetic lid lifter, remove one lid at a time from the warm water.

 

Placing lid on jar

8. Place a lid on top of each filled jar.

 

Tightening band to fingertip tight

9. Using your fingertips, screw a band onto each jar until you meet resistance — then a little bit more. This is called “fingertip tight.” Use a hot pad to hold the jar.

 

Placing filled jar on rack in canner

10. When all jars are filled and banded, put them all on the rack in the canner. The water in the canner should be boiling when you put the jars in. This is important because if it takes too long to bring the water back to a boil, the pectin could be de-activated from too much heat exposure. 

Lowering rack into canner

11. The jars should be upright, not touching each other, and covered by 1 to 2 inches of water after you lower the rack into the canner, if using this type of rack.

12. The water will likely lose its boil as you put the jars in. Put the top on the canner and bring the water back to a boil as quickly as possible. Once you have a rolling boil, set a timer, and boil:

  • 4-ounce jars for 5 minutes at sea level
  • 8-ounce up to 16-ounce jars for 10 minutes at sea level

13. For Altitude For All Jar Sizes: Add 1 minute for every 1,000 ft above sea level. For example, if you are between 1,000 and 2,000 ft, boil for 11 minutes; 2,000 to 3,000 ft, boil for 12 minutes, and so on. If you don’t know your elevation, you can find it by putting in your address or your city name at this website.

.

Removing filled jar from canner

14. Remove jars when the time is up. 

 

Placing jar on counter

15. Place hot jars right side up on a mat or a towel. Leave jars alone to seal and begin cooling. 

If you are concerned about fruit float, read this FAQ on fruit float.

 

Remove band and check seal

16. When jars are thoroughly cool (12 to 24 hours), remove bands and check seals. Lids should be sucked down and not come off if you pull up gently with your fingertips. Jam reaches its full jell when thoroughly cool.

17. Clean off any jam on the outside of the jars or lids. Label and store jars, preferably in a dark location. Dark storage can help preserve color in low-sweetener jam. Sealed jars should be stored without the rings.

18. Properly water bathed and sealed jam is best eaten within 1 year.

19. It is always a good practice to examine the contents of a jar when you open it. First, be sure that you “pop a seal.” A jar that was safely sealed a few months ago could lose its seal on the shelf, although this rarely happens. Then look for identifiable fuzzy mold, a moldy smell, a fermented (alcoholic) smell, or fizziness that could be a sign of fermentation. If any of these are present, throw the contents of the jar away. It’s not a good idea to eat moldy jam or fermented jam or to scrape the mold off and eat what’s below it.

20. An open jar of low-sweetener jam or jelly can be expected to last about 3 weeks in the refrigerator.

21. If jam or jelly is thoroughly cool and has not jelled, visit our page: My Jam or Jelly Didn’t Jell — Can I Fix It?

Note: If you don’t want to process your jam or jelly in a water bath canner and you have freezer space available, you can freeze jam for long-term storage. Leave 1/2″ of headspace in your freezer-safe containers and freeze filled containers when jam is cool. Defrost before eating. Best eaten within 1 year of freezing.

Muscadine Grape Jam

Muscadine Grape Jam is a low-sugar or low-honey cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Muscadine Grape Jam Ingredients

4 cups prepared muscadine grapes (see Steps 2 through 5 below)
4 teaspoons calcium water
½ cup up to 1 cup honey or ¾ cup up to 2 cups sugar
2 teaspoons Pomona’s Pectin powder

Muscadine Grape Jam Directions

1. Wash jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring to a boil. Turn off heat, cover, and keep jars in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan; cover and heat to a low boil. Turn off heat and keep lids in hot water until ready to use.

2. Wash the grapes. Then score the end of each grape with a paring knife and pop the flesh out of the skin and into a sauce pan. Place the skins in a bowl and set aside.

3. Bring the skinless grapes to a boil and simmer until soft, about 10 minutes. Put the simmered grapes into a Foley mill or a fine sieve and push the pulp and juice through into a bowl,  leaving behind the seeds. Discard the seeds.

4. Place the skins in a sauce pan with just enough water to keep them from sticking to the bottom of the pot. Bring to a boil and simmer until soft and tender (10 to 15 minutes). Puree the skins in a blender or food processor.

5. Add processed skins to the bowl of pulp and juice and stir together well. Measure 4 cups of this mixture into a sauce pan.

6. Add calcium water, and mix well.

7. Measure sugar or room temperature honey into a bowl. Thoroughly mix pectin powder into sweetener. Set aside.

8. Bring fruit mixture to a full boil. Add pectin-sweetener mixture, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while the jam comes back up to a boil. Once the jam returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

9. Fill hot jars to ¼” of top. Wipe rims clean. Screw on 2-piece lids. Put filled jars in boiling water to cover. Boil 10 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level). Remove from water. Let jars cool. Check seals; lids should be sucked down. Eat within 1 year. Lasts 3 weeks once opened.

Muscadine Grape Butter (pulp and juice, no skins) — use this recipe for Concord Grape Butter.

Muscadine Grape Jelly (juice only) — use the cooked Concord Grape Jelly recipe on the direction sheet that comes with the pectin. Can be sweetened with sugar or honey (pink section) or with juice concentrate (green section).

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