Meyer Lemon Marmalade

Meyer Lemon Marmalade

Meyer Lemon Marmalade

Meyer Lemon Marmalade is a low-sugar cooked marmalade made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin. She says: “Meyer lemons are native to China, and are believed to be a cross between a lemon and a Mandarin orange. This marmalade has a delightful sunny-yellow color and a soft-set consistency. It is less sour than standard Lemon Marmalade and a bit orange-y, with a touch of bitterness.”

If you have standard lemons, which are more acidic and less sweet than Meyer lemons, use the Lemon Marmalade recipe.

Yield: 6 to 7 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Meyer Lemon Marmalade Ingredients

10 Meyer lemons (preferably organic)
3 cups water
4 teaspoons calcium water
2½ cups sugar
5 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Meyer Lemon Marmalade Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Wash lemons thoroughly. Using a vegetable peeler, remove the colored part of the peel from 2 of the lemons. Slice these peels into thin, length-wise strips about 1 inch long, and set aside.

3. Remove and discard the remaining white pith from the 2 peeled lemons. Then, remove and discard all of the peel and pith from the remaining 8 lemons.

4. Pull apart into segments all 10 peeled lemons, then chop these segments into small pieces.

chopped Meyer lemon and rind

5. Combine the chopped lemon, the sliced peel, and the 3 cups of water in a large sauce pan. Cover the mixture and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat and simmer, still covered, for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove the pan from the heat.

6. Transfer the mixture into a bowl or other heat-proof container, then measure out 6 cups of the mixture. (If you have any left over, you can use it for something else.) Pour the measured quantity of the mixture back into the sauce pan. Add the calcium water, and stir to combine.

7. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and the pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

8. Put the sauce pan on the stove and bring the lemon mixture up to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return marmalade to a boil, then remove from heat.

9. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with marmalade, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

10. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

11. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

12. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Read Allison’s complete blog post here.

You may also like: Lemon Marmalade, Satsuma MarmaladeTriple Citrus Marmaladeor Sunrise Marmalade.

Lemon Marmalade

Lemon Marmalade

Lemon Marmalade

Lemon Marmalade is a low-sugar cooked marmalade made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin. She says: “This recipe was developed for standard, full-acid lemons – what you’ll generally find in the lemon section of the grocery store. Eureka and Lisbon lemons are the commonly available varieties. This marmalade has a delightful sunny-yellow color and a soft-set consistency.”

If you have Meyer lemons, which are not as acidic and a bit sweeter than standard lemons, use the Meyer Lemon Marmalade recipe.

Yield: 6 to 7 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Lemon Marmalade Ingredients

8 medium-large lemons (preferably organic)
3½ cups water
4 teaspoons calcium water
3 cups sugar
5 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Lemon Marmalade Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Wash lemons thoroughly. Using a vegetable peeler, remove the yellow part of the peel from 4 of the lemons. Slice these peels into thin, length-wise strips about 1 inch long, and set aside.

3. Remove and discard the remaining white pith from the 4 peeled lemons. Then, remove and discard all of the peel and pith from the remaining 4 lemons.

4. Pull apart into segments all 8 peeled lemons, then chop these segments into small pieces.

chopped lemon and rind

5. Combine the chopped lemon, the sliced peel, and the 3½ cups of water in a large sauce pan. Cover the mixture and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat and simmer, still covered, for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove the pan from the heat.

6. Transfer the mixture into a bowl or other heat-proof container, then measure out 6 cups of the mixture. (If you have any left over, you can use it for something else.) Pour the measured quantity of the mixture back into the sauce pan. Add the calcium water and stir to combine.

7. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and the pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

8. Put the sauce pan on the stove and bring the lemon mixture up to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return marmalade to a boil, then remove from heat.

9. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with marmalade, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

10. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

11. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

12. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

lemon marmalade swirled into yogurt in bowl

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Read Allison’s complete blog post here.

You may also like: Meyer Lemon Marmalade, Honeyed Pear-Lemon Marmalade, Lemon Jamor Triple Citrus Marmalade.

CanningCraft Creates: Lemon Marmalade & Meyer Lemon Marmalade

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

Without a doubt, February is the time for marmalade. Not only is it the height of the citrus season, when fresh, quality fruit is widely shipped and easily available, but the sunny nature of this yellow-orange spread is bound to bring on a bit of a smile during this often cold and bleak month.

I like most any kind of marmalade, but Lemon Marmalade is probably my favorite. I find it’s extra-sour nature an ideal complement to the slight bitterness of the peels when rounded out with a bit of sweetener. Standard, full-acid lemons – what you’ll generally find in the lemon section of the grocery store – are ideal for the Lemon Marmalade recipe. Eureka and Lisbon lemons are the commonly available varieties.

Meyer lemons and box of pectin

Meyer Lemons

Meyer lemons are a popular alternative, and many people enjoy using them as they are not as acidic as standard lemons, and are a bit sweeter. They are native to China, and are believed to be a cross between a lemon and a Mandarin orange.

Despite their name, I find that Meyer lemons look and taste more like oranges than they do like lemons. They are typically rounder and slightly smaller than regular lemons, and while they are yellow when less ripe, they become increasingly orange as they ripen.

Both types of lemons are great for marmalade, but, as you might expect, the marmalades they yield are a bit different from each other. Likewise, the recipes are slightly different, to account for differences in acidity and bitterness, and to highlight each fruit’s best qualities.

Conner holding marmalade jars

Lemon Marmalade on the left and Meyer Lemon Marmalade on the right, as you face the picture

So, should you make the Lemon Marmalade, or the Meyer Lemon Marmalade? If you like assertive flavors and are a fan of sweet and sour, go for the Lemon Marmalade.

If, on the other hand, you prefer a marmalade that’s less sour and a bit orange-y, with a touch of bitterness, then you’ll likely love the Meyer Lemon Marmalade.

Or, give them both a try! Both have a delightful sunny-yellow color, and a soft-set consistency. Any way you go, these marmalades are delicious served alongside scones, or swirled into vanilla yogurt. Enjoy!

Lemon Marmalade recipe is here.

Lemon Marmalade

Lemon Marmalade

Meyer Lemon Marmalade recipe is here.

Meyer Lemon Marmalade

Meyer Lemon Marmalade

Recipes and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Tomato Marmalade

Tomato Marmalade on toastTomato Marmalade is a low-sugar cooked marmalade made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin. She says: “In-season, locally grown tomatoes work best, as tomato taste and quality are key in this recipe. As for the citrus, use organic if you can, as this recipe calls for the peels, in addition to the fruit and juice.”

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Tomato Marmalade Ingredients

Tomato Marmalade Ingredients2¾ pounds tomatoes
1 small orange
4 small lemons, divided
1 cup water
1½ cups sugar
2 teaspoons calcium water
2 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Tomato Marmalade Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Remove skins from tomatoes. To do this, heat a pot of water to boiling, place tomatoes in boiling water–just a couple of tomatoes at time–for 30 to 60 seconds, or until the skin spits. Remove tomatoes from boiling water and immediately submerge them in a large bowl of ice water. The skins will slip right off. If the skin did not split during this blanching process (which occasionally happens), simply nick the skin with a paring knife and peel the skin off. Discard the skins.

3. Slice tomatoes in half, then remove and discard the cores. Dice the tomatoes. Place the diced tomatoes in a colander or strainer, and place the colander or strainer in or over a large bowl. Set aside, and allow the tomatoes to drain into the bowl while you’re working on the next steps.

4. Wash the orange and the lemons thoroughly. Using a vegetable peeler, remove the outer part of the peel from the orange, and from 2 of the lemons. Then, slice these peels into very thin, length-wise strips about 1 inch long, and place in a sauce pan.

5. Remove and discard the remaining white pith from the peeled orange and the 2 peeled lemons. Pull the fruit apart into segments, and slice these segments into small pieces. Remove and discard any seeds, then add the cut up segments to the sauce pan.

Prepared tomatoes, lemons, and lemon peel

6. Slice the remaining 2 lemons in half and squeeze out their juice, discarding peels when done. Set aside 1/4 cup of this lemon juice. Add any remaining lemon juice to the sauce pan.

7. Add the 1 cup of water to the citrus mixture in the sauce pan. Also add to the sauce pan the juice that has drained from the tomatoes. Cover mixture and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat slightly and cook, covered, for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the diced tomatoes, increasing heat as necessary to bring mixture back up to temperature, then continue to cook, still covered and stirring occasionally, for another 3 minutes.

8. Remove the pan from the heat, empty the tomato-citrus mixture into a bowl or other heat-proof container, then measure out 4 cups of the mixture. (If you have any left over, you can use it for something else.) Pour the measured quantity of the mixture back into the sauce pan. Add the remaining 1/4 cup lemon juice and the calcium water, then stir to combine.

9. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

10. Bring the tomato-citrus mixture to rolling boil over high heat. Add the sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return the marmalade to a boil, then remove from heat.

11. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with marmalade, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

12. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

13. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

14. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Tomato Marmalade on spoon

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Read Allison’s complete blog post here.

You may also like: Honeyed Tomato-Jalapeno Jam, Strawberry-Tomato Jam, our basic Tomato Jam, or, for something completely different, try Tomato-Shrimp Aspic (just omit the shrimp to make a vegan Tomato Aspic).

CanningCraft Creates: Tomato Marmalade

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

Okay, I have a tomato-related confession to make. Ready? When I first started working on this recipe, I wasn’t so sure I was going to love the end result. I mean, I adore garden-fresh tomatoes, but . . . in marmalade?

Now that I have several jars in my pantry, and an open one in the fridge that is rapidly disappearing, I am happy to tell you that I am a total convert. Tomatoes in marmalade are amazing! Not just okay – but truly delicious.

One of the things that makes the tomatoes work so well in this recipe, I think, is that the chunks of tomato are not cooked for very long, so they hold their shape somewhat. Suspended in the soft-set orange jell, amidst slivers of orange and yellow peel, the bright red tomato pieces look almost jewel-like, and are surprisingly sweet.

Tomato Marmalade on spoon

In-season, locally grown tomatoes work best, as tomato taste and quality are key in this recipe.

As for the citrus, use organic if you can, as this recipe calls for the peels, in addition to the fruit and juice.

My family and I have really been enjoying this marmalade in the simplest of ways – spread on toast for breakfast, or (I have to admit) by the spoonful from the jar. What an unexpectedly delicious way to enjoy summertime tomatoes!

Tomato Marmalade

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Tomato Marmalade Ingredients

Tomato Marmalade Ingredients2¾ pounds tomatoes
1 small orange
4 small lemons, divided
1 cup water
1½ cups sugar
2 teaspoons calcium water
2 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Tomato Marmalade Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Remove skins from tomatoes. To do this, heat a pot of water to boiling, place tomatoes in boiling water–jus t a couple of tomatoes at time–for 30 to 60 seconds, or until the skin spits. Remove tomatoes from boiling water and immediately submerge them in a large bowl of ice water. The skins will slip right off. If the skin did not split during this blanching process (which occasionally happens), simply nick the skin with a paring knife and peel the skin off. Discard the skins.

3. Slice tomatoes in half, then remove and discard the cores. Dice the tomatoes. Place the diced tomatoes in a colander or strainer, and place the colander or strainer in or over a large bowl. Set aside, and allow the tomatoes to drain into the bowl while you’re working on the next steps.

4. Wash the orange and the lemons thoroughly. Using a vegetable peeler, remove the outer part of the peel from the orange, and from 2 of the lemons. Then, slice these peels into very thin, length-wise strips about 1 inch long, and place in a sauce pan.

5. Remove and discard the remaining white pith from the peeled orange and the 2 peeled lemons. Pull the fruit apart into segments, and slice these segments into small pieces. Remove and discard any seeds, then add the cut up segments to the sauce pan.

Prepared tomatoes, lemons, and lemon peel

6. Slice the remaining 2 lemons in half and squeeze out their juice, discarding peels when done. Set aside 1/4 cup of this lemon juice. Add any remaining lemon juice to the sauce pan.

7. Add the 1 cup of water to the citrus mixture in the sauce pan. Also add to the sauce pan the juice that has drained from the tomatoes. Cover mixture and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat slightly and cook, covered, for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the diced tomatoes, increasing heat as necessary to bring mixture back up to temperature, then continue to cook, still covered and stirring occasionally, for another 3 minutes.

8. Remove the pan from the heat, empty the tomato-citrus mixture into a bowl or other heat-proof container, then measure out 4 cups of the mixture. (If you have any left over, you can use it for something else.) Pour the measured quantity of the mixture back into the sauce pan. Add the remaining 1/4 cup lemon juice and the calcium water, then stir to combine.

9. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and pectin powder. Mix well and set aside.

10. Bring the tomato-citrus mixture to rolling boil over high heat. Add the sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return the marmalade to a boil, then remove from heat.

11. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with marmalade, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

12. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

13. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

14. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Tomato Marmalade on toast

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Printable copy of the Tomato Marmalade recipe only here.

CanningCraft Creates: Pepper Jam — Hot as You Like!

Allison Carroll Duffy

Allison Carroll Duffy

Here in Maine, our season for heat-loving crops, like peppers, is short to be sure. But when it’s here – as it finally is – it’s here! In gardens, at farmers’ markets, and even in the grocery store, local peppers are overflowing – colorful, abundant, and truly gorgeous.

Hot pepper jelly is a great way to enjoy these beauties, but this summer, why not also try some hot pepper jam? It’s similar in taste to hot pepper jelly, but the texture is different, as the peppers are blended, which gives it a soft, jammy consistency. And, like pepper jelly, it is delicious served with a crusty baguette and sharp cheddar cheese.

While you can use any variety of bell pepper or hot pepper in this recipe, peppers that are similar in color work best, as the end result will be visually much more appealing. This recipe keeps it all in the green family, using green bell peppers and jalapenos.

Additionally, you can adjust the degree of spiciness in this recipe to suit your taste. If you like extra heat, you may wish to increase the hot pepper quantity slightly, while decreasing the bell pepper quantity by the same amount. If you like things a bit more mild, you may want to do the opposite.

However, it’s very important that you do not increase the overall quantity of peppers in the recipe. Peppers are a low-acid food, and must be balanced with the correct quantity of acid (vinegar, in the case of this recipe) in order for the jam to be safe for boiling water bath canning.

Be sure to use standard white or apple cider vinegar with 5 percent acidity.

Pepper Jam Ingredients

Pepper Jam

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Pepper Jam Ingredients

2½ cups finely chopped green bell pepper
1½ cups finely chopped jalapeno pepper
2 cups vinegar
3 teaspoons calcium water
2 cups sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Pepper Jam Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Wash the bell peppers, remove and discard seeds and finely chop. Repeat the process for the jalapeno peppers.

Chopped peppers

3. Measure the chopped bell peppers and the chopped jalapeno peppers. Combine the measured quantities in a sauce pan and add the vinegar.

4. Cover the pepper mixture and bring it to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Then, remove it from the heat.

5. Transfer the pepper mixture to a blender or food processor and blend the mixture. Since the mixture will be hot, be sure to vent the lid of the blender. Return the mixture to the sauce pan, then add the calcium water and stir to combine.

6. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and the pectin powder. Mix thoroughly and set aside.

7. Put the sauce pan back on the stove and bring the pepper mixture up to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return the mixture to a boil, then remove it from the heat.

8. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jam, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

9. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

10. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

11. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Pepper Jam on Crackers -- Yum!

Pepper Jam on Crackers — Yum!

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Printable copy of Pepper Jam recipe only here.

Pepper Jam — Hot as You Like!

Pepper Jam on crackers

Pepper Jam on Crackers — Yum!

Pepper Jam — Hot as You Like! is a low-sugar cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy.

This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin. She says: “While you can use any variety of bell pepper or hot pepper in this recipe, and while you can adjust the degree of spiciness in this recipe to suit your taste — it’s very important that you do not increase the overall quantity of peppers. And be sure to use standard white or apple cider vinegar with 5 percent acidity.”

Read Allison’s complete blog post with all of her tips for varying this recipe here.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Pepper Jam Ingredients

Pepper Jam Ingredients

Pepper Jam Ingredients

2½ cups finely chopped green bell pepper
1½ cups finely chopped jalapeno pepper
2 cups vinegar
3 teaspoons calcium water
2 cups sugar
3 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Pepper Jam Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Wash the bell peppers, remove and discard seeds and finely chop. Repeat the process for the jalapeno peppers.

Chopped peppers

3. Measure the chopped bell peppers and the chopped jalapeno peppers. Combine the measured quantities in a sauce pan and add the vinegar.

4. Cover the pepper mixture and bring it to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Then, remove it from the heat.

5. Transfer the pepper mixture to a blender or food processor and blend the mixture. Since the mixture will be hot, be sure to vent the lid of the blender. Return the mixture to the sauce pan, then add the calcium water and stir to combine.

6. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and the pectin powder. Mix thoroughly and set aside.

7. Put the sauce pan back on the stove and bring the pepper mixture up to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return the mixture to a boil, then remove it from the heat.

8. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jam, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

9. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

10. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

11. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

Recipe and photos by Allison Carroll Duffy

Read Allison’s complete blog post here.

You may also like: Peach-Jalapeno Jam, Strawberry-Jalapeno Jam, Raspberry-Habanero Jam, or Pepper Jelly with Sugar or Honey.

Peach-Jalapeno Jam

Peach-Jalapeno Jam is a low-sugar cooked jam made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy. This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin.

Before making this recipe, please read these important notes, from Allison, about safety and options:

Pepper Choices: You can use any color of bell pepper and any variety of hot pepper that you wish, in any combination, as long as the total quantity of peppers, including both hot peppers and bell peppers, does not exceed 1 cup. If you like extra heat, you can increase the hot pepper quantity, while decreasing the bell pepper quantity by the same amount. f you prefer less heat, you can do the opposite. Peppers are a low-acid food, and must be balanced with the proper quantity of acid (vinegar, in this case) in order for the jam to be safe for boiling water bath canning, which is why the overall quantity of peppers used in this recipe must not exceed 1 cup.

Bell peppers can be omitted and replaced by additional peaches if you prefer. 

Vinegar Choices: Use standard white or apple cider vinegar with 5 percent acidity.

Fruit Choices: If you prefer to use fruits other than or in addition to peaches, there are a few other fruits that will work well with this recipe. Specifically, in addition to peaches, you may use any combination of nectarine, apricot, sweet cherry, sweet plum, or pear (but not Asian pear). Fruits not on this list will not work well with this recipe.

Yield: 5 to 6 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Peach-Jalapeno Jam Ingredients

3¼ pounds peaches
½ cup finely chopped bell pepper
½ cup finely chopped jalapeno pepper
¾ cup vinegar
6 teaspoons calcium water
1¼ cups sugar
4½ teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Peach-Jalapeno Jam Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Remove and discard peach peels and pits, then mash the peaches thoroughly. (Note: Ripe, slightly soft peaches are definitely best, but if firm peaches are your only option, you can soften them by placing the chopped peaches in a sauce pan with ½ cup of water, bringing the mixture to a boil, and simmering them for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Then, thoroughly mash the softened peach mixture.)

3. Wash the bell peppers, remove and discard seeds and finely chop. Repeat the process for the jalapeno peppers.

4. Measure the chopped bell peppers and the chopped jalapeno peppers. Place the measured quantities in a sauce pan and add the vinegar.

5. Cover the pepper-vinegar mixture and bring it to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Then, remove it from the heat.

6. Measure out 4 cups of the mashed peaches. (If you have any mashed peach left over, you can use it for something else.) Add the measured quantity of fruit to the pepper-vinegar mixture in the sauce pan. Then, add the calcium water and stir to combine.

7. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and the pectin powder. Mix thoroughly and set aside.

8. Put the sauce pan on the stove and bring peach mixture up to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve pectin. Return the jam to a boil, then remove from heat.

9. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with preserves, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

10. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

11. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

12. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

You may also like: Peach-Jalapeno Jelly, Raspberry-Habanero Jam, and Strawberry-Jalapeno Jam.

Peach-Jalapeno Jelly

Cherry-Jalapeno Jelly on crackers

Sweet Cherry-Jalapeno Jelly
Photo by Mary Lou Sumberg

Peach-Jalapeno Jelly is a low-sugar cooked jelly made with Pomona’s Pectin. Pomona’s Pectin contains no sugar or preservatives and jells reliably with low amounts of any sweetener. See below for where to buy. This recipe was created by Allison Carroll Duffy for Pomona’s Pectin.

Before making this recipe, please read these important notes, from Allison, about safety and options:

Pepper Choices: You can use any color of bell pepper and any variety of hot pepper that you wish, in any combination, as long as the total quantity of peppers, including both hot peppers and bell peppers, does not exceed 1 cup. If you like extra heat, you can increase the hot pepper quantity, while decreasing the bell pepper quantity by the same amount. f you prefer less heat, you can do the opposite. Peppers are a low-acid food, and must be balanced with the proper quantity of acid (vinegar, in this case) in order for the jelly to be safe for boiling water bath canning, which is why the overall quantity of peppers used in this recipe must not exceed 1 cup.

Vinegar Choices: Use standard white or apple cider vinegar with 5 percent acidity.

Fruit Choices: If you prefer to use fruits other than or in addition to peaches, there are a few other fruits that will work well with this recipe. Specifically, in addition to peaches, you may use any combination of nectarine, apricot, sweet cherry, sweet plum, or pear (but not Asian pear). Fruits not on this list will not work well with this recipe. If you don’t have fresh fruit to work with, you can purchase unsweetened fruit juice and use that instead. Just be sure that the fruit juice contains no additional ingredients. If you are using unsweetened fruit juice rather than fresh fruit, skip steps 2 and 3.

Yield: 5 to 6 cups

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water should be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Peach-Jalapeno Jelly Ingredients

4½ pounds peaches
½ cup finely chopped bell pepper
½ cup finely chopped jalapeno pepper
¾ cup vinegar
6 teaspoons calcium water
1¼ cups sugar
5½ teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Peach-Jalapeno Jelly Directions

1. Wash and rinse jars, lids, and screw bands. Set screw bands aside until ready to use. Place jars in boiling water bath canner with a rack, fill at least 2/3 of the way full with water, and bring to a boil. Boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize (add 1 additional minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level), then turn down heat and let jars stand in hot water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small pan, bring to a low simmer, and hold there until ready to use.

2. Remove and discard peach pits and peels, then chop the peaches and place in a sauce pan with 1 cup water. Cover, bring the peaches up to a boil, reduce the heat slightly and simmer for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove the pan from the heat and thoroughly mash the peaches. (Note: It is not essential that you pit and peel the peaches, as it is only the juice obtained from the peaches that will be used in this recipe. However, pitting and peeling the peaches will give you the option, after you’re done with this recipe, to use the spent mashed peach pulp in a variety of different ways, rather than simply composting it. Try it in smoothies, or on vanilla ice cream!)

3. Transfer the mashed peaches into a jelly bag. (An impromptu bag made from layers of cheesecloth wrapped around the mashed fruit and gathered at the top works equally well, if you don’t have a jelly bag.) Suspend the jelly bag over a large bowl and allow the mashed fruit to drip juice into the bowl until you have accumulated 4 cups of juice. This will likely take 2-4 hours. After you have accumulated the necessary 4 cups of juice, you can compost the fruit pulp, or – even better – use it for something else.

4. Wash the bell peppers, remove and discard seeds, and finely chop. Repeat the process for the jalapeno peppers.

5. Measure the chopped bell peppers and the chopped jalapeno peppers. Place the measured quantities in a sauce pan and add the vinegar.

6. Cover the pepper-vinegar mixture and bring it to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Then, remove it from the heat.

7. Measure 4 cups of the peach juice (If you have extra juice, use it for something else). Pour the measured quantity into the sauce pan with the vinegar-pepper mixture. Then, add the calcium water and stir to combine.

8. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar and the pectin powder. Mix thoroughly and set aside.

9. Put the sauce pan on the stove and bring the peach mixture up to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the sugar-pectin mixture, then stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes, still over the highest heat, to dissolve the pectin. Return the jelly to a boil, then remove it from the heat.

10. Remove hot jars from canner and fill jars with jelly, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, and put on lids and screw bands, tightening bands only to “fingertip tight” (until resistance is met, and then just the tiniest bit more).

11. Place jars in the hot water, on the rack inside the canner. (Make sure jars are upright, not touching each other or the sides of the canner, and are covered with at least 1-2 inches of water). Place the lid on the canner, return the canner to a rolling boil, and boil for 10 minutes. (Add 1 minute additional processing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.)

12. Turn off heat and allow canner and jars to sit for 5 minutes. Then remove jars from canner.

13. Allow jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Then confirm that jars have sealed. Remove screw bands from sealed jars, rinse off outside of jars if necessary, label jars, and store for later use.

You may also like: Pepper Jelly with Agave and SteviaPepper Jelly with Sugar or Honey (no fruit juice in either of those), and Cranberry-Habanero Jelly.

Savory Spiced-Mango Conserve

Savory Spiced-Mango ConserveExcerpted from Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin by Allison Carroll Duffy (Fair Winds Press, June 2013)

Allison says: “If you’re a fan of chutney, give this conserve a try!

“Inspired by the classic Indian condiment, this conserve melds the sweetness of mangoes with the earthy, complex flavors of garlic, ginger, and a variety of other spices.

“Remember, for canning safety, it’s important that you do not increase the quantities of any of the vegetables or spices in this recipe, and be sure to use bottled lemon juice.”

Before You Begin:
Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water may be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Savory Spiced-Mango Conserve Ingredients

2 pounds ripe, firm mangoes
2/3 cup diced onion
2 teaspoons peeled, finely grated ginger root
1 teaspoon minced garlic
¾ cup water
¾ cup white vinegar
½ cup golden raisins (or dark raisins, if you prefer)
1½ teaspoons ground coriander
1 teaspoon mustard seed
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
½ teaspoon ground turmeric
¼ teaspoon ground cumin
1/8 teaspoon hot pepper flakes
¼ teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons lemon juice
2 teaspoons calcium water
1 1/3 cups sugar
2 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Savory Spiced-Mango Conserve Directions

1. Wash your jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring canner to a rolling boil, and boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize them. (Add 1 extra minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.) Reduce heat and allow jars to remain in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan, heat to a low simmer, and hold until ready to use.

2. Peel, pit, and dice mangoes.

3. In a saucepan, combine mangoes, onion, ginger, garlic, the ¾ cup water, vinegar, raisins, coriander, mustard seeds, cinnamon, turmeric, cumin, hot pepper flakes, and salt. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce heat, and then simmer, covered, for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat.

4. Measure 4 cups of the cooked mango mixture (saving any extra for another use), and return the measured quantity to the saucepan. Add the lemon juice and calcium water and mix well.

5. In a separate bowl, combine sugar and pectin powder. Mix thoroughly and set aside.

6. Bring the mango mixture back to a full boil over high heat. Slowly add sugar-pectin mixture, stirring constantly. Continue to stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve pectin while the conserve comes back up to a boil. Once the conserve returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

7. Can Your Conserve: Remove jars from canner and ladle hot conserve into hot jars, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, put on lids and screw bands, and tighten to fingertip tight. Lower filled jars into canner, ensuring jars are not touching each other and are covered with at least 1 to 2 inches of water. Place lid on canner, return to a rolling boil, and process for 10 minutes (adjusting for altitude if necessary). Turn off heat and allow canner to sit untouched for 5 minutes, then remove jars and allow to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Confirm that jars have sealed, then store properly.

You may also like: Caramelized Onion-Maple JamSavory Rhubarb Conserve, or Apple-Rosemary Jelly.

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